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Full text of "Winchester Star: January 5, 1951 - March 30, 1951"

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PU1LIC LIBRARY, 

• iMcmstit . 



THE WINCHESTER STAR. 



MASS. 



VOL. LXX NO. 20 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR, FRIDAY. JANUARY 5, 1951 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



S< HOOL REFKKLNDI M \ OTE 
in \'H\A IXCT8 

1. Jl'XIOH HIGH SCHOOL lil ILDLMJ ALTERATIONS 

(Xecessarj tn Pass 2,32$) 

PRKC PKKC. PREC. I'REC. PREC. PREC. Total 

NO 21o i:io :•<• li'ti 440 1221 

Bian « • 6 .! 3* 

2. HIGH s< HOOL in ILIUM. VLTERATIOXS 

(Necessarj i<> Pass, 2,330) 

YES 261 335 808 811 421 71 330T 

NO 201 208 123 D4 122 441 • 1189 

Blanks 3 3 T 4 9 8 34 



MR U K KIT 



EI LIOTT 



SCHOOLS FAILED ON 
REFERENDUM 



Small Note Failed to Produce 
Necessary Two-Thirds by Small 
Margins. 



PETITION FOR SPECIAL 
TOWN MEETING ON SCHOOL 
QUESTION 



School proponents failed by 57 
votes to get the two-thirds neces- 
sary to put across the program for 
additional facilities for the high 
and junior high school pupils at 
the referendum held last week 
Thursday. Two-thirds votes were 
necessary because of bond issues 
involved in both votes. 

The proposal to add wings to the 
present junior high school and 
use this building to house a four- 
year senior high school failed by 
57 votes of the necessary two 
thirds, those favoring the plan 
polling 2271 and its opponents, 
1,221. Necessary to pass were 
2,828 votes. 

The proposal to convert the 
present senior high school into a 
two-year junior high school with 
remodelling, renovating and the 
necessary equipment, failed by an 
even smaller margin of achieving 
the necessary two-thirds. Propo- 
nents polled 2,307 votes and oppo- 
nents, 1,18!*, with 2,330 being 
necessary to pass. 

The sum of $1,419,400, was voted 
for the junior high school project 
at a special town meeting Novem- 
ber 30, by a vote of 153 to five; 
$1,400,000* to be raised bv an issue 
of 20 year bonds and $19,400, by 
transfer from the Excess and Defi- 
ciency account. For the remodel- 
ling and renovating of the senior 
high school to house a junior hitrh 
school the same meeting appro- 
priated $231,000 by a vote of 1<>2 
to four; $150,000 of this amount to 
be raised by an issue of ten year 
bonds and the remaining $81,000 
to be taken from the Excess and 
Deficiency account. 

Petitions for a referendum were 
filed by Captain Richard M. Rush, 
Arthur J. Hewis, Jr., and Michael 
Saraco, and for several weeks be- 
fore the referendum both sides 
were busy circulating arguments in 
support (<f their position. The 
League of Women Voters and the 
Winchester Mothers' Association 
entered the fight on the side of the 
schools and there were meetings 
held at the schools in the various 
districts in the interest of the 
building campaign. 

From the first many believed it 
would be difficult for the school 
proponents to get the necessary 
two-thirds vote, but in view of the 
strenuous campaign waged, the 
odds against the schools shortened 
appreciably before the referendum, 
and the narrow margin by which 
the building proposals failed, not 
merely to pass but to get a two* 
thirds vote, indicates the work 
(lone in behalf of the project in 
advance of last Thursday. 

Many reasons have been given 
for the failure of the school pro- 
ponents to cany their objectives. 
Among them, the two most often 
beard mentioned were the bringing 
of the school children into the poli- 
tical battle and the alleged pres- 
sure placed on those interested in 
the Washington School addition to 
work for the high and junior high 
plan if they hoped to carry their 
Washington School program to a 
successful conclusion. 

Shrewd political capital was 
made of both these points, together 
with the admitted fact that the 
School Building Committee did not, 
at the special town meeting on 
November 30, devote as much time 
and effort to explanations of the 
high and junior high school plans 
as they did to their number one 
proposal. '.<> erect an entirely new 
junior high school building on 
Lake street. In view of advance 
opposition expressed to this plan 
by the Finance Committee, Select- 
men and Planning Hoard, there was 
little chance of success for this 
proposal, a tact which any one at 
the meeting could have grasped 
just by listening to the remarks of 
both the School Building Commit- | 
tee and School Committee. Speak- 
ers from both groups surely gave 
the impression that the Lake street 
plan was out. 

Probably all these things enter- 
ed somewhat into the voting at the 
referendum, together with the 
clamoring for more shops than 
seemed to appear in the Building 
Committee's "alternate plan" for 
the interchange of the high and 
junior high. 

Many also feel that the publica- 1 
tion of last minute figures alleging 
to show the decline of population 
in both the junior and senior high 
schools over the past four years 
played an important part in decid- 
ing the referendum. 

The real controlling factor in the 
outcome, however, was the failure 
of slightly more than sixty per- 
cent of the electorate to vote. A 
good sized vote was necessary for 
the schools to have much of a 
chance of success. Slightly more 
than 39 percent of an election list 
of 8,959 went to the polls last 
Thursday, making the 1,221 votes 
cast against the junior high en- 
largement plan, and the 1,189 votes 
in opposition to the senior high 
school remodelling project more 
than enough to block both pro- 
posals. 

The vote by precincts appears at 
the top of this column. 



The Selectmen have received a 
petition, signed by some 600 regis- 
tered voters of the town asking 
the Board to call a special town 
meeting for further consideration 
of the secondary school proposals 
recently defeated on a referendum. 

The petition was filed with the 
Selectmen to Roland A. Parker and 
Ben R. Schneider, who made it 
clear that they were acting entire, 
ly independent of the School Build- 
ing Committee, whose proposals, 
passed by a special town meeting 
November 30 were beaten by last 
week's referendum. 

Briefly these proposals were to 
enlarge the- present Junior High 
School to house a four-year senior 
high school and to remodel and 
renovate the present Senior High 
building to house a two-year junior 
high school. The two motions 
passed at the special November 
meeting involved about $1,600,000, 
much of which was to be raised by 
bond issues. 

Both school motions were passed 
by overwhelming majorities at the 
November meeting, a total of nine 
persons being recorded in opposi- 
tion on both votes, five on one and 
four on the other. Because of the 
bond issues involved it was neces- 
sary to have a two-thirds majority 
to pass, and this fact enabled op- 
ponents of the projects to heat 
them on the referendum, the pro- 
posal to enlarge the junior high 
losing by 57 votes and the high 
school remodelling losing by 23 
votes. 

At the time of the referendum 
there was talk of a recount, but up 
to press time no petition had been 
received and yesterday was the last 
day in which a recount petition 
could be filed. 

The Selectmen have no option in 
the matter of calling a special town 
meeting. In the event two hundred 
registered voters of the town so 
petition they are obliged to call one, 
within 30 days of the receipt of the 
petition. It was announced at the 
i town hall yesterday that the Boprd 
will meet next week to fix the spe- 
cial meeting date. 




White flowers decorated the al- 
tar of the First Congregational 
Church on Saturday afternoon, De- 
cember 30, for the marriage of 
.Miss Jennie Louise Elliott, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Herb- 
ert Elliott of Hen-irk street, to 
Richard Furlong Brackctt, son of 
Mi-. Mai tin Richard Brackctt of 
Cambridge street and the late Mr, 
Brackctt of Great Neck, N. V. Dr. 
Howard J, Chidley, pastor of the 
church, performed the candlelight 
: ceremony at 4:30 o'clock, and the 



iridal music wa.- 



piayeu 



the 



HEMROl'LLE CHAPEL 
Brlgian (iifts Once HunK Here 

BELGIAN AMBASSADOR 
SENDING ATTACHE TO 
WINCHESTER 



MRS. FLORENCE F. BUTLER 



Mis. Florence E. Butler of 9 
Lewis road, widow of Joseph W. 
Butler, former School Committee 
member and first permanent clerk 
of the Finance Committee, died 
Sunday, December 31, at the Win- 
chester Hospital following a 
month's illness. 

Mrs. Butler was the daughter of 
Charles S., and Adeline M. (Allen) 
Waring. She was horn in Fall 
River, May 19, 188(1, and married 
Mr. Butler in that city in 1914. She 
had lived in Winchester for 35 
years, for most of that time on La- 
in ange street, and at her Lewis 
road address since her husband's 
death in 1943. She was a member 
of the Winton Club, of the Shake- 
speare Club, Needlework Guild of 
America and Mission I'nion Guild 
of the First Congregational 
Church. 

Mrs. Butler leaves two sons, 
Charles W., and Joseph W. Butler, 
both of Winchester; a sister. Miss 
Edith A. Waring of Fall River; and 
four grandchildren, Thomas Cooper 
Butler, Anne Lothrop Butler. 
Joseph W. Butler, 3rd; and Jona- 
than B. Butler, all of Winchester. 

Funeral services were held 
Tuesday afternoon at Ripley 
Memorial Chapel of the First Con- 
gregational Church with the pas- 
tor. Dr. Howard J. Chidley, officiat- 
ing. Burial was in Wildwood 
Cemetery. 



ENGAGEMENT A N NO I X C ED 

At a party given at their home at 
14 Winthrop street Friday night. 
Mr and Mrs. Daniel R. Beggs, Jr. 
announced the engagement of their 
daughter. Jane to Harry Easton 
III. son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry M. 
Easton of Seneca road. 

Both young people graduated 
from Winchester High School class 
of '48. Jane is a junior at Mt. Hol- 
yoke College. Harry is a junior 
at the University of Maine where 
he is a member of Beta Theta Pi 
fraternity. 



G KINDLES GAVE FACULTY 
TEA 



Principal and Mrs. Wade L. 
Grindle gave a tea for members of 
the Winchester High School faculty 
at their home on Mason street Wed- 
nesday afternoon. Mrs. Edward 
A. Bartlett assisted Mrs. Grindle 
with arrangements and Mrs. Ray 
\ Hayward and Miss Helen Bron- 
son poured. 



Baron Silvercruys, Belgian Am- 
bassador to the United States, is 
sending his Military Attache, Major 
Count Izan Dumonceau, to Winches- 
ter Sunday to represent the Ambas- 
sador* at the presentation of the 
gifts being sent to Winchester by 
the little Village of Hemroulle in 
Belgium. 

Major Count Dumonceau is fly- 
ing to Boston where he will be met 
by Major Samuel I.. Hiehert, chap- 
lain of the 1st Service Command at 
the Army Base in that city. Major 
Hiehert will escort the Belgian At- 
tache to Winchester together with 
| Col. Leo A. Bissett, commanding 
• officer of the Massachusetts Mili- 
, tary District. 

Col. Bissett, who speaks French 
! fluently, will express the Army's 
appreciation of their generosity to 
the people of Hemroulle at the pro- 
gram to be held at the high school 
auditorium commencing at 4 
o'clock. Major Count Dumonceau 
will read a message from the Bel- 
gian Ambassador. 

Mrs. Kenneth B. Toye heads the 
Hemroulle Friendship Committee 
i which has arranged the program 
I for Winchester's acceptance of the 
i gifts being sent the town by Hem- 
roulle. Mrs. Toye headed the com- 
mittee in 1947 that arranged for 
the collection of sheets to be sent 
to Hemroulle to replace those bor- 
rowed hy a Winchester boy, Lt. ''oh 
I "Jack" Hanlon, to camouflage his 
paratroopers as they prepared to 
defend Hemroulle from the Nazis 
during the Battle of the Bulge in 
World War II. 

It was the return of these sheets 
several years after the successful 
defense of the village that so 
touched the villagers they decided 
t<> send giffs in turn to their friends 
! in Winchester. 

Taking from their little chapel 
the ancient paintings which rep- 
resent the Stations of the Cross 
they have sent these paintings to 
Winchester, to be given, one each 
to the churches of Winchester, the 
"churches that rang the bells" to 
summon Winchesterites to bring 
their sheets for Hemroulle to the 
High School in the fall of '47. 

These paintings will be pres- 
ented to the pastors or rep- 
resentatives of the town's churches 
Sunday afternoon by Dr. Albert 
Navez, Belgian Consul in Boston. 
Nicholas II. Fitzgerald, designated 
representative o f the Board of 
Selectmen on the Hemroulle Friend- 
ship Committee will accept the pic- 
tures for the town. Vincent Farns- 
worth, chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, will send official greet- 
ings from Winchester to Hemroulle, 
and the entire acceptance program 
will be transcribed and sent abroad 
by Station WRUL of the World 
Wide Broadcasting Foundation. 

Edward A. Bartlett, who made 
such a fine impression as master 
of ceremonies at the sheet collect- 
ing program in 1947, will again 
serve in that capacity on Sunday. 
Preceding the program members 
of the Winchester High School 
Band will play under the direction 
of Fred Felmet. director of instru- 
mental music in the Winchester 
Schools. The Belgian National 
Anthem will be sung by the High 
School Girls' Octette, directed by- 
Miss Eleanor Anifantis, head of 
vocal music in the high and junior 
high schools. The audience will 
join in singing "The Star Spangled 
Banner" and at the conclusion of 
the program, in "Auld Lang Syne." 

Rev. Dwight W. Hadley, rector 
of the Church of the Epiphany, will 
make the invocation and the bene- 
diction will be pronounced by Rev. 
Fr. John P. O'Riordan, pastor of St. 
Mary's Church. "Jack" Hanlon, 
now associated with the Providence 
Journal, will speak to his friends 
in Hemroulle through WRUL. 

The public is cordially invited 
to attend this program, which be- 
cause of the broadcast feature will 
not be long. There will be no ad- 
mission charge and every one is 
welcome. "Hemroulle Remembers!" 
Winchester should not forget! 



church organist and choirmaster, 
.1. Albert Wilson. 

Miss Elliott was given in niar- 
liage by her father She wore a 
gown of white chiffon velvet trim- 
med at the neck and sleeves with 
heirloom lace and sted pearls. Her 
full-length veil of Belgian lace was 
caught to a velvet helmet match- 
ing her gown and trimmed with 
seed pearls and crystals. Her bou- 
quet combined white cyclamen and 
white heather. 

Miss Barbara May Elliott of Win- 
chester was her bister's honor at- 
tendant, and the bridesmaids were 
Miss Dolores Anderson of Roches- 
ter, X. Y„ college roommate of the 
bride; Mrs. David Dixon MeNeish 
of Stoughton, college classmate of 
the bride; Miss Ellen Kenerson of 
Winchester and Mis. Donald L, 
Puffer, also of Winchester and sis- 
ter of the bridegroom. 

All the bridal attendants wore 
velveteen dresses, that of the honor 
maid being gold, and the brides- 
maids, emerald green. All wore 
pearl tiaras and carried bouquets 
of poinsettias and ivy. 

Donald I.. Puffer of Winchester 
was best man for M Rrackott. and 
the usher corps comprised Theodore 
Herbert Elliott, Jr.. of Winchester, 
brother of the bride; John Brad- 
ford Harlow of Suncook, N. H., 
formerly of Winchester; and two 
college roommates of the bride- 
groom, Norman M. Winter- of Gob 
densbridge, \. Y., and Roger W 
Sullivan of West Roxbury. 

A reception was held after the 
ceremony at the Music Hall on 
Bacon street which was bedecked 
with Christmas greens, magnolia, 
white flowers and poinsettias. As- 
sisting in receiving were the par- 
ents of the bride and the mother of 
the bridegroom, the maid of honor 
and the bridesmaids. 

After a wedding journey to Stm - 
bridge Mr. and Mrs. Brackett will 
make their home in Beverly. 

Both the bride and bridegroom 
graduated frfim Winchester High 
School, the bride graduating from 
Mt. Hoi yoke College in the class of 
1950, Mr. Bracket! is a Bowdoin 
College graduate, ci; s of 1950, and 
a member of the D'"a Upsilon fra- 
ternity. He is >*?ociated with the 
A. C. Lawrence Leather Company 
in Peabody, 



\DOPTS CREEK BO\ 

Winchester Woman Participates In 
Foster Parent- Plan 

Mrs. Leo J. Cass of 20 Ridgefield 
road has adopted 13 year-old Spirt- 
don Tzoi'tzis of Greece through the 
Foster Patents Plan fur War 
Children, a plan that in its 13 years 
of existence has given aid to ijt),(j0tj 
innocent children suffering from 
the effects of war. Children of 
fourteen war-ravaged lands on this 
side of the lion Curtain are repre- 
sented in the Plan. 

Mis. Cass, like all other foster 
parents, will pay $15 monthly for 
a year, providing food, clothing, 
shelter and medical care for the 
"adopted" child. Many persons 
prominent in public life, including 
many top motion picture stars, are 
participating in the plan. 

Spiridon Tzortzis, the Greek boy 
adopted by Mrs. Cass, is of a 
family that met disaster during an 
air raid in 1941. His father was 
instantly killed and his mother sus- 
tained chest injuries as well as hav- 
ing her two year-old son killed in 
her aims. The family suffered ter- 
ribly during the German occupa- 
tion, the mother and her three sons 
living only through the kindness of 
friends who shared what little they 
had to eat themselves. 

Now Spiridon and his mother 
and brothers live in one room, with 
no kitchen or bathroom facilities, 
on a pension of $28 per month, 
w hich is insufficient to provide food 
alone for the family. It is only 
with the Foster Parents Plan that 
Spiridon receives the nourishing- 
food, warm clothing and medical 
care he so desperately needs to 
make up for the privations of the 
war years. 

Spiridon is a tine young boy with 
black hair and eyes. An excellent 
student, he is considered the best 
in his class. He believes he would 
like to be a ship mechanic, for then 
he would be able to travel and work 
at the same time. 

American Headquarters for the 
Foster Barents Plan for War 
Children, Inc., is at 55 West 42nd 
street, New York 18, N. Y. Clean 
used clothing, shoes, blankets, small 
kitchen utensils and toys will be 
gratefully received at the Plan's 
warehouse, 5-30 47th avenue, Long 
Island City. \. Y. Allan T. Zachary 
is director of public relations, and a 
letter addressed to him at Plan 
Headquarters will bring any speci- 
fic information about the plan that 
may he required, 




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McKENZIE 



IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
CHOIR ON THE AIR 



MRS. FRANCES T. COSTELLO 

Mrs. Frances T. Costello, wife of 
J. J. Costello of '< Mason street, 
tlietl Wednesday morning, January 
1 3, at her home, following several 
weeks' illness. 

Mrs. Costello was the daughter 
of William P., and Mary Elizabeth 
(O'Donnell) Haley, her family on 
her father's side having been long 
prominent in 'the patent leather 
business in Winchester. She was 
born in Winchester and educated 
in the Winchester schools and at. 
Bridgewater Teachers' College, 
Before her mairiage she taught at 
the Webster School in Cambridge. 

Mrs. Costello was one of the or 
ganizers of the Winchester Guild 
of the Infant Saviour, serving the 
Guild as vice-president. She was 
also a member of the Bellarmine 
Society and of the Fortnightly 
Women's Club. 

She leaves her husband, three 
sons, J. J. Costello, Jr., of Belmont, 
Robert F. Costello of Welleslev 
Hills and Paul L. Costello of Cam- 
bridge; also a sister, Mrs. George 
F. LeDue; a brother, James V. 
Haley, both of Winchester; and 
seven grandchildren. 

The funeral was held this Fri- 
day morning with a solemn high 
mass of requiem at St. Mary's 
Church at 10 o'clock. Interment 
was in Wildwood Cemetery. 



The Girls Choir of the Im- 
maculate Conception Church ap- 
peared on John Kiley's "Daily In- 
spiration" program over Station 
WMh\ last Friday morning, mak- 
ing the trip to the station in East- 
ern Massachusetts Street Railway 
buses <ind Boston Elevated trains 
because of the severe storm. It had 
been originally planned to have the 
14 girls, their director, Mrs, Rod- 
erick A. Munroe and her associate. 
Miss Pauline McLaughlin, driven 
to the broadcast in private cars. 

John Kiley. organist on the pro- 
gram, greeted the gills upon their 
arrival at the studio, and compli- 
mented the choir on its performance 
of "Adeste Fideles" and "Holy 
Night." After the broadcast Mr. 
Kiley showed the girls over the 
studio and good naturedly played 
many request numbers for them. 

Leaving Station WMEX the choir 
went to Station WNAC where a 
receptionist conducted the girls and 
their directors on a sight-seeing 
tour. I.uneh at Howard Johnson's 
concluded a most enjoyable post- 
( hristmas treat. 



PLAYING WITH FLORIDA 
ORCHESTRA 

Miss Ruth G. Miller of 326 Main 
street is playing in the first violin 
section of the Symphony Orchestra 
of Central Florida at Orlando dur- 
ing the orchestra's concert sea- 
son of twelve weeks. 

Miss Miller is a music major at 
Bennington College in Benning- 
ton, Vt., and is playing in the 
Central Florida Symphony for her 
winter term off campus. 



DR. ELIASSEN TO SPEAK TO 
BAPTIST BROTHERHOOD 

On Sunday morning at 9:30 when 
the Men's Brotherhood ( lass meets 
in the Social Hall for their regular 
class Professor Rolf Eliassen of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology will speak to the men on 
"Public Health". Dr. Eliassen was 
awarded the George Westinghouse 
award for his outstanding contri- 
butions to the study of public 
health and sanitary engineering, 
and for developments in the courses 
of study and his understanding 
methods of teaching. All men are 
invited to this unusual opportunity 
to hear an outstanding man in this 
field. 

ENGAGEMENT 

Mr. and Mrs. James R. Grace of 
77 Brookside avenue announce the 
engagement of their daughter, Al- j 
thea Ann. to Mr. Lewis W. Starble, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Pasquale 
Starble of Salem street, Woburn. 



HE \DS HEART FUND 
CAMPAIGN IN WINCHESTER 

Mrs. Wilfred McKenzie of 20 
Ardley Place will serve as General 
Chairman of the Winchester 1951 
Heart Fund, according to Edgar A. 
Perry, Chairman. Heart Fund Com- 
mittee, Massachusetts Heart As- 
sociation. 

Otis Jason of 1 Myrtle street will 
act as Vice-Chairman in charge of 
plastic hearts, the familiar device 
used t o collect funds i n public 
places. 

The campaign will be held dur- 
ing the month of February. Pro- 
ceeds will be used to carry on a 
program of research, education and 
community service. 

Prior to her marriage last August 
Mrs. McKenzie practiced law in 
Washington D. C. and Boston. She 
attended the Abbott Academy of 
Arts. Washington D. C, and the 
University of Pennsylvania. She re- 
ceived her I. LB from the Columbus 
University School of Law, Wash- 
ington D. C, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1942. She is a member 
of Sigma Delta Kappa, honorary 
legal sorority. After graduation 
from law school she handled cases 
for the Domestic Relations Com- 
mission, United States District 
Court. In 1943 she received an ap- 
pointment to the staff of the Judge 
Advocate General of the Army 
and assisted in compiling and pub- 
lishing a supplement to United 
States Military law. 

In 1946 Mrs. McKenzie joined 
the legal staff of the Veterans' 
Administration Affairs in Wash- 
ington. Later that year she was 
transferred to the Boston office 
of the Veterans' Administration in 
a similar capacity. She has been 
active in volunteer work with tin- 
Red Cross since coming to Now 
England. 

The enmnaign for fund:- to uip- 
port the work of the Heart As- 
sociation will get under way 
February I. 

MRS. EUGENIA VI. QITNN 

Mrs, Eugenia M. Quinn of 7 Rob- 
inson Circle, widow of Edward X. 
Quinn and mother of Mrs. George 
I.. Govoni of this town, died Sun- 
day. December 31. 

Mrs, Quinn was born in Boston, 
hut had been for many years a 
resident of Medford before moving 
to Winchester. She was a ehartet 
member of the Medford Catholic 
Women's Club, 

Resides her daughter in Win- 
chester, Mis. Quinn leaves three 
sons. N'orbert, staff artist of the 
Boston Globe; Graham, and Francis 
Quinn; and a daughter, Mrs. Myles 
T. Mi-Sweeney. 

The funeral was held Wednesday 
morning from the Gaffey Memorial 
Funeral Home in Medford with re- 
quiem high mass at St. Mary's 
Church. Interment was in Dak 
( rove Cemetery. Medford. 



ii, 

ilmintiiii iti the llich S. h. . i 
f.»r Wilu-hester u.l.ilt*. 
(i. WiHinesday, 7 :45 p. m. . 
I Pi efi KMitiml Weiii, t:'.- (<ui|d-, 
Kafieiml Church, juvu-nt Paul 
Lit i i: i.'! ii>t. Ail wunien invtUtt. 
1. Tlno-.li.y. 7 i)n p. m. - Htv- 
uliii merttng of Mystic Viti ev Lottie, 
MuMinic ApartmrtitK. 

.la Hilary 11. Tlnirmluy, T : i0 p. m. to It 
l>. in. - Hmlniinti.il in the Hitrh Schiml 
gymnasium f..i Win. h. -M adults. 

January 15, Memlay - History Group. 
WinehWU'r' College Uul, - Hostess: Mi-. 
.1 ,1. McGoverit. 4$ Everett Avenue. 

January 17, Wednesday, 2;00 p. ni. - 
In Art Boom. Wm.hesur Library. Win- 
Chester Home an I Garden Club. Koda- 
chrome slides "Butaniiiing from an Auto- 
mobile" b> Mr-. John Chipman. 

January 20, Suturdny. 2:00 p m. - 
Winchester Historical Society, Bay State 
Historical U-auue (oust of Boston Uni- 
versity. Speakers: Or. Daniel L. Marsh. 
President, and Dr. Robert E. Moody on 
"Huston Men and the Winning of Ameri- 
can In lependence." 

January ■>", Thursday, Friday, 

Saturday - Winton Club Cabaret. T..»n 
Hall, '.'.ml p. m 



WINCHESTER WOMAN 
KKMINGTON WITNESS 

Mrs. Muriel William of 234 High- 
land avenue was one of three wit- 
nesses testifying Tuesday against 
William W. Remington, former 
Commerce Department economist, 
on trial in New York for alleged 
perjury in denying Communism. 

Mrs. Williams testified she knew 
Remington as a Communist in 
Knoxville, Tenn., in 1937, also testi- 
fying she had been a member of the 
Communist party while working 
for the T, V. A. from 1936 to 1939. 
With Mrs. Williams in New York 
at the trial was her husband, Still- 
man P. Williams, Harvard, '.'15, 
whom she married December 20, 
1939, while both were employed 
by the Tennessee Valley Authority. 
Mrs. Williams is a Holyoke grad- 
uate, class of 1935, They have a 
child, l.indsley, who will be 10 on 
January 11. 

After service with the T. V. A. 
front ltt.'l't to 1943, Mr. Williams 
was commissioned a lieutenant in 
in the Navy Reserve and saw- ser- 
vice in the Pacific. In 194G he was 
executive director of the Migratory 
Labor Health Association iii 
Georgia, operated in conjunction 
with the United States Department 
of Agriculture. 

Kui-ing 1948 he was with the 
1'nited World Federalists, Inc., in 
Georgia, and in 1949 became pro- 
gram analyst with the World 
Health Association stationed in 
Geneva, Switzerland. He and his 
wife, a native of Round Brook, 
X. .1., have been living in Winches- 
ter for the past year. 

N VME1) RANK 
VK E-I*R ESIDENT 

Mr. A Ivan G. Smith of 2:5 Evcrell 
road was recently elected vice- 
president of the First National 
Hank of Boston, 

Mr. Smith joined the First Na- 
tional Rani; in January of 1927 and 
•v.is a loan officer at the tittle t>£ 
ms promotion. A native of" Med- 
ford, he graduated from Medford 
Hied School, and from Harvard 
I'niversity in the class of 192»». 
lie married the former Alice 
Vlitehell of Winchester in 1931 and 
''ley made their home in Medford 
nmtl Miming to Winchester 1.") 
years ago. They have three sons, 
Alvan, Jr., Jeffrey, and Langdon, 
the latter Winchester High School's 
football place-kicking specialist. 



SELECTIVE SERVICE 
NOTICE 

Winchester Registrants under Selective Service are reminded 
that it is their responsibility to keep their Local Selective Service 
Board advised of any change of address or chance of personal cir- 
cumstances which might affect their classification. Communica- 
tions should be sent to Local Selective Service Board No. 21, City 
Hall, Medford, Mass. s29-tf 



STAR GOES TO TEN CENTS 



Beginning with tlii- issue the price per copy for the Star 
is advanced three cent?. From now on single copies will be 
ten cent-. 

For the present the subscription price of the Star will 
remain at $2.50 a year. Subscribers will continue to receive 
their copy of die Star each Friday at this price. 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

FIRST AID CLASSES 

Civil Defense training teaches people how to perform the 
services needed before, during, and after an enemy attack. In 
conformity with our Civil Defense training program it is planned 
that all workers receive basic training in standard First Aid. 
Due to existing conditions and for the protection of our community 
should an emergency arise, it is essential that First Aid training 
be made available to the largest number possible. 

Classes in First Aid under the direction of Winchester Chap- 
ter, American Red Cross, will commence the week of January 15. 
The first class will meet on Monday evening, January 15 from 
7:30 until 9:30 and continue for nine consecutive Monday evenings. 
Other classes will be arranged as the need develops. Those inter- 
ested should communicate with the local office of the Red Cross, 
telephone Winchester 6.2300 or the Department of Civil Defense, 
telephone Winchester 0-3257 not later than January 10. Both of 
these offices are in the Town Hall. 

Janu-s W. Blackhani 
Director of Civil Defense 



PUBLIC HEARING 

Town Hall 
Tuesday Evening, January 9 
at 7:45 P.M. 



the High School and Enlarged Junior 
High School Building Committee cor- 
dially invite- the public to pre-.-nt at 
thi« time constructive -ugge-tioris for 
desired changes in the Secondary 
School Plans voted on by the Town at 
the Special Town Meeting on Novem- 
ber 30. 



2 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY, JANUARY 5. 1951 




A MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK 

MORTGAGES 

WE HAVE A PLAN TO SUIT EVERYONE 
WITH OR WITHOUT PRINCIPAL PAYMENTS 
AT REASONABLE INTEREST RATES 

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SEE US IF YOU ARE PLANNING TO 
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YOUR PRESENT MORTG VGE 



Telephone WInehester 6-2 ISO 



Winchester Savings Bank 



26 MT. VERNON ST. 



MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 8AM TO 2 P M 




WIN CHESTER, MASS 

NOT OPEN SATURDAYS 



NCORPORATED 187 




JAMES N. (NONNY) COG AN 

Winchester Marine Private 
.lames \. Cogan, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles E. Cogan, 54 Richard- 
son street, Winchester, Mass., is 
presently undergoing basic train- 
ing at Parris Island, S. C. 

A graduate of Winchester High 
School, Private C'ogan was former- 
ly employed as a carpenter prior 
to his enlistment in the Marines. 
"N'onny", former baseball captain 
at Winchester High, is receiving 
ten weeks of basic trainin.tr at the 
famed Marine Corps Recruit Dep.it 
in such fundament a! military sub- 
jects as first aiii. hygiene, pre- 
cision drill. Tactics and' Marine tra- 
ditions. 

"N'onny' - will become highly pro- 
ficient m the use of weapons includ- 
ing the garand i iHe, * 'arbine, pistol, 
ami the Browning automatic rifle. 

Private Cogan volunteered for 
enlistment with the proud Leather- 
necks and was enlisted on Novem- 
ber 1(1, lt>50. 




MOFFETT 
FUNERAL SERVICE 

M. G. MOFFETT 

Keg. Funeral Director and 
Em ba Inter 

ITT Washington Street. Winchester 

Tel. Winchester d-1730 

mal;i-tf 



THE MISSION UNION GUILD 

The Mission Union Guild of he 
First Congregational church of 
Winchester will meet on Tuesday. 
January 9, 1951. Miss Margaret 
Sand- and Miss Grace Pound will 
direct the usual sewing at 10:00 
a. m. The board members will meet 
at lL':i)i) noon. Luncheon will be 
served at 1:00 p. m. in the Social 
Hall with Mrs. Charles VV. Love- 
joy and Mrs, K. Oder Pride a- 
chairmen. 

The Guild will meet at 2:00 
o'clock in the Ladies' Parlor with 
Mrs. Frederic B. Withington, I)i- 
reetoi of the Mission Union Guild, 
[presiding, and Mrs. Howard Chid- 
1 ley in charge of the worship ser- 
I vice. 

The speaker of the afternoon will 
| be Mrs. Ralph Shrader of West 
Newton, whose husband, the Rever- 
end Ralph R. Shrader, is Project 
Secretary of the Missions Council 
of the Congregational Christian 
Churches. Widely travelled. Mrs. 
Shrader was with her husband in 
China for six years, thus gaining 
first-hand knowledge of one impor- 
tant phase of the outreach of our 
churches, namely, our foreign 
Board work. More recently, she 
has visited our churches in the 
Hawaiian Islands, which have 
themselves been sources of vigor* 
oiis missionary activity among the 
peoples of the islands further west 
in the Pacific. Last spring, with 
her husband, she made an exten- 
sive study tour of some of our 
southern schools, both Negro and 
white, thus gaining personal knowl- 
edge of this vital part of the work 
of our Hoard of Home Missions. 

She is. therefore, acquainted with 
the outreach of the church in all 
its mftjoi directions :it home and 
abroad. 

Mrs. Shrader will speak on "Our 
Friendly Service Projects." There 
will be pictures of schools and h"s- 
pitals in the South and an exhibit 
of sewing done for these service 
projects, 

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS 




THE FORTNIGHTLY 



An International Relations Day 
program has been provided for The 
Fortnightly's first meeting of the 
new year, to be held in Masonic 
Hall on Monday, January 8. 

The meeting has been planned in 
conjunction with the League of 
Women Voters of Winchester, with 
Mrs. Rowland Patrick, Chairman 
for the League and Mrs. Walter 
Winship. Chairman of The Fort- 
nightly's International Relations 
Committee. 

Mrs. Ivor A. Richards of Cam- 
bridge, Mass. will speak on "Life 
in China today." Mrs. Richards and 
her husband, Professor Richards of 
Harvard University, both British 
born, lived in China for many years: 
Mrs. Richards having taught 
in normal schools and Women's 
Universities in various parts of 
China was recently an invited guest 
of Yeuohing University, spending 
several months in and around 
Peking. She is therefore well 
equipped to give first hand in- 
formation on China's past and pre- 
sent Academic World as well as the 
common life of the people. 

Dessert will be served at 1:00 
p. in. with the regular meeting be- 
ginning at '2:00 p. m. 

Hostesses: Mrs. Harold E. Berg- 
quist. Miss Marian Clarke and Mrs. 
R. II. Meigs. 




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One share or one hundred shares? We're equipped to 
service any size order, and welcome the opportunity to 
do so. Our responsibility is to serve your investment 
requirements professionally, no matter their size. Each 
order, each request for factual information, gets the same 
careful attention. 

Your purchase of 1. 5. or 10 shares, or 100, makes you 
owner of an interest in the entire business of the com- 
pany you select -its factories, raw materials, reputation, 
everything it has. everything it produces. 

Some of our customers make regular purchases of the 
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Members of 

New York Stock Exchange Midwest Stock Exchange 

New York Curb Exchange (Associate) 

Maurice C. Bird. Registered Representative 
.'III Federal Street. Boston. Mass. 
Telephone: HAncock 6-I2.1G 
Chicago New York Boston 




WINCHESTER HOSPITAL 
NEWS 

Girl Scouts at Winchester 
Hospital 



eceived the additional smaller 
•land signifying the completion of 
180 hours. 

Twenty-four new girls began 
Service in the autumn: Natalie An- 
derson, Nancy Ayer, Janice Allen, 
Ann Bledsoe, Lieta Berman, Carol 
Brown, Marjorie Cameron, Suzanne 
Donnell, Madeline Derro, Betsy 
Freeman, Janet Graves, Barbara 
Har rigan, Martha Halloran, Peggy 
McNally, Nancy Mors.', Betty Lou 
Martcnsen, Grace McPeake, Flor- 
ence Newton, Patricia Pag". Mary 
Rehni, Sheila Scanlon, Jeanne 
Volpe, Suzanne Wadsworth, and 
Ann Whiton. As this service ac- 
quires a certain maturity of expe- 
rience by the Scout leaders and by 
the nursing supervisors, and as it's 
traditions become better known 
among the girls themselves, it ap- 
pears certain that it will prove 
more and more worthwhile to the 
Hospital and to the Scouts. 



\NOE VOYAGEURS HELD 
REUNION 



The joint meeting of the League 
I International Relations Commit- 
tee i and the Fortnightly will be 
held at the Masonic Hall on Mon- 
day, January 8, wi*h dessert and 
coffee at 1 :0M p, ni. and the | 
program at 2:00 p. m. Mrs. 

I. A. Richards (Dorothy Pilleyi. 
will speak on "Life in China 
Today". Mrs. Richards was the 
guest of Yenoking University 
from April to August, 1!*")0. She 
and her husband lived and taught 
m various parts of China for tive 
years after so she is familiar 

with the social and academic life ■ 
there, Her book, "Climbing Days", I 
a record of her many mountain 
ascents, is now being reissued. Mrs 
Richards was a recent speaker for 
the Women's City Club of Boston. 



<»n December 21, the summer 
canoe trip known as the St. Croix 
Voyageurs held their reunion at 
Gustie's Restaurant in Cambridge. 
The St. Croix Voyageurs is run to 
give modern boys knowledge and 
experience of living in the North- 
ern Maine woods. These trips set 
'•ut every summer on the waters 
of the St. John. Allagash, and 
Penobscot rivers of Maine: and 
provide for the boys a very enjoy- 
able and profitable summer. 

Attending this reunion from Win- 
chester were Mr. and Mrs. Waldon 
B. Hersey, Mr. A. W. Pratt. El- 
liott Hersey, Tom Joy, Dave Pratt, 
John Atkinson, and Dave and John 
Holdsworth. The affair lasted for 
nearly four hours during which 
time a good supper was enjoyed fol- 
lowed by movies and slides taken 
during the past summers. Plans 
for the forthcoming summer were 
discussed and promise many good 
times for next summer. 





uf a/if /wun 



FUNERAL SERVICE 

418 MASS AVE. ARLINGTON 
Ctl. ARuncton 5-1(3 34- 





Girl Scouts are showing this year 
so much enthusiasm for service at 
Winchester Hospital that the choice 
of new recruits ltat> been placed on 
| a more highly competitive basis 
under the supervision of Mrs. 
Frank C. d'Elseaux. In view of the 
importance of the work, this is a 
very satisfactory state of affairs. 
For several years past a few- 
Scouts have helped after school 
hours to do many things which save 
steps for the graduate nurses, such 
as making beds, carrying trays, 
feeding child patients, and answer- 
ing lights. This assistance is espe- 
cially helpful to the nurses on 
Second Surgical, as well as to those 
in charge of child patients. The 
Hospital frequently calls attention 
, to the value of this service, and last 
winter the photographer from Life 
magazine took a series of shots of 
the girls at their Hospital duties 
when he was preparing the feature 
article on the Winchester High 
School which appeared in March, 
1950, Two of these photographs 
are reproduced in the most recent 
Report of the Winchester Hospital. 

Within the past fortnight an- 
other kind of duty has been added 
to the Scouts' schedule, courier ser- 
vice for the Gray Ladies who act as 
hostesses at the front office desk. 
I Since each patient is permitted 
; only two visitors at a time, it is 
I often important to check on those 
! actually in the room of a patient 
j when additional visitors arrive. 
I The Gil l Scout couriers are the way 
of answering the question. The 
girls themselves enjoy rendering 
j this service during visiting hours, 
land it is welcomed by the Gray 
; Ladies, by the callers, and by the 
' patients themselves. 

There are thirty Scouts now on 
duty, six of them of last year's 
group: Florence Caterino, Nancy 
Dowling, Eugenia Flaherty, Cathe- 
rine (loss, Judy Mawn, and Becky 
Smith. All of these girls have 
earned their insignia for 50 hours. 
Nancy Dowling anil Catherine (loss 
have in addition their band for one 
hundred hours and have recently 




NOMA* WA^IMtHW 



Kimball 



FUNERAL SERVICE 

39 Church Street 
Winchester 

Winchester 6-0200 




John W . Lane. Jr. 
— Director — 

TOO Main Street, Winchester 
Winchester 6-2580 



THREE 
SKILLS 



Nut une. but several skil.s ro into 
your pretcribed medicine. That of 
the iloctor who diagno6ea and then 
writes the prescription . . . that of 
the technicians working in labor- 
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and that of the pharmacist wh.. 
carefully compounds the tpccUted 
drugs exactly as your doctor or- 
iei-ed Kach nf these skills depend 
,1 ot! th.. others, und taktn togeth- 
er they n 'd up to the medicine that 
wili »rW >• return to good 



©PHARMACY**. 
294 WASH ST-Bflf 
WINCHESTER^"* 7 



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You'll love the way your hair re- 
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KeraGENE is your ally. Phone for 
an eorly appointment for a Harper- 
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BEAUTY SALON 

HELEN GRAVES 

573 Main Street 
Tel. WI 6-0330 



dec'»«-2t 




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20 Mill Street 
ARiingnm $-mx 

Edmund L. Front, President 
Thomas J. Keefe, Manager 

tot m ht couaiW and tstlmattt 



World's largest long dis- 
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RENTONS 

Church Street Opposite Winchester I ru-t Co. 

For 



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PARK RADIO CO 



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Winchester 6-2280 



Serving Winchester for Over 17 Years 



Cummings the Florist 



18 Thompson Street 



Tel. WI 6-1077 



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A Full Line of Cut Flowers and Plants 



Winchester 
Cleaning Service 



Winchester 6-051 3- J 



MIKE PENTA, Proprietor 

Homes - Offices - Stores 

WE CLEAN 

Windows, walls, floors, Venetian blinds, rugs, cellars, and at- 
tics. Windows repaired, glass set; screen and storm window 
service, Gardens, lawns, etc., cared for. Rubbish removal. 
Floors shellaced and waxed. 



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Winchester 6-2213 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 5. 1951 



3 



WINCHESTER UPSET 
READING 



Won Middlesex League Game, 
60 - 34 



Winchestei High upset favored 
Reading High by a scen e of 60 - 34 

at the high school gym last Friday 
night to win their first Middlesex 




TUXEDOS 
FOR HIRE 
For All 
Occasions 



PHILIP CHITEL 
MEN'S SHOP 

596 Main Street 



League contest of the season. This 
was the fourth straight victory of 
the season for the Red and Black 
and their most impressive conquest 
to date as they completely domi- 
nated the plav from the opening 
whistle. 

Winchester opened fast to jump 
away to a 13 - o lead at the end of 
the first quarter. With Rodney Long 
Scoring 8 of Winchester's 15 points 
in the second quarter, the locals 
pulled away to a 28 - 14 half time 
lead. The Red and Black enjoyed 
their largest scoring bulge in the 
third quarter to h ad 47 - 23 at the 
close of that period and then 
coasted to an easy win in the final 
period. 

The Bed and Black used their 
height t'i good advantage as they 
pretty well controlled both back- 
boards. Coupled with this, the 
locals handled the ball well as they 
made very few mistakes and were 
taking only pood shots at the hoop 
as their shooting accuracy of 38 
percent of their shots indicates. In 



contrast, the Reading quintet tried 
to play *'race-horse'' basketball 
which led to many bad passes and 
POOF shots at the basket which cost 
them possession of the ball in most 
cases. Rodney Long with h> points, 
John Dilorio with 13, and Charlie 



VACATION 
HOOI 



OPENS GIRLS' 
SEASON 



M 



LOCAL SERVICE 

r 

0 

0 

> 

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m 
I 
< 

o 



LOCAL SERVICE 



hy with in points were the 
leading scorers fof the Bed and 
Black. .Murphy and Doug Hawkins 
d!d a very effective job in bottling 
Up Gibson and Surdam, the lead- 
ing Beading scorers, while Long. 
Hawkins and Dilorio were grab- 
bing practically every rebound off 
both the offensive and defensive 
backboards, 

The Winchester Seconds kept 
pace with their varsity teammates 
by winning their fourth straight 
game of the season in defeating 
the Reading Seconds by a score of 
■17 • 30. Peter Coon with 12 points, 
Norman Howard with 9, and Joe 
Donlon with 8 points were the lead- 
ing Winchester scorers with Donlon 
turning in an outstanding floor 
game. 

The summary: 

Winchester High 



Braving a slightly chilly atmos- 
phere, the senior and junior girls 
met the alumni on the basketball 
floor, December 27, fur their an- 
nual game. The final outcome was 
a little topheavy with the under- 
graduates totaling 8 points to the 
opposition's 87, As there were nc 
limits for qualification. Miss Car- 
loll and Miss Barnes, the assistant 
coach, made their appearance on 
the floor. 

The lineup was as follows; 
Winchester 



f 



r 

8 

> 
r 



TELEVISION 

INSTALLATION 
SERVICE 
SALES 

LOCAL SERVICE IS BETTER 
★ 



? WINCHESTER APPLIANCE CO. 



j 15 Thompson Street 

LOCAL SERVICE 



LU 
U 

> 
U 

85 

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3 

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Winchester 6-2990 3 

LOCAL SERVICE 



Dil. 



f pts 



If 



Hawkins, c 
f'arivl!. £ 
Long, Ik 
Donlon, lg 
Mui (ihy. tk 
CiiurKo, rn 

TotnN 



Lyons. I; 
Carlton. If 
Gibfton, rf 
McQueen, rf 
Sur mm, c 
Kutijte, c 
Hardy, Ik 
Murphy, '.u 
Dennett, rg 



(I 



4 
4 

16 
0 

10 



Reading High 



U 60 



f pt». 



r, 
o 

A 

(E: 

10 

5 
4 
(I 
0 



Damon, Mary Anne. 
Morton, Sue. rf 
Dasdihach, Gretchie, rf 
Xeiley, Jean, If (captain) 
C»'< onnell, Mary. If 
Kneeland, Bette, cf 
Lanigan, Paula* cf 
Crockett, Carol, cf 
Chiswell, Jane, rg 
Smith, Margaret, rg 
Stevens, Lynn, rg 
Hawkins, Carol, |g 
Collins, Jan, lg 
Snell. Judy, Ig 
MacDonald, Han is, i g 
Easton, Jan, eg 



Alumni 

Burbank, Barbara, rf 
Barnes, Mildred, rf 
Svmnies, Priscilla. If 
Barrett, Dee, If 
Chase. Marilyn, cf 
Carroll, Marge, rg 
Carroll, Helen, lg 
Banies. Mildred, eg 
Burbank, Barbara, eg 



Totals 14 (', 34 

RfforiTs. Busa anil Oaffney 

Cynthia Morse returned to hei 
studies at the University of Mass- 
achusetts at Amherst on Tuesday, 
after spending the Christmas holi- 
days at her home on Lloyd street. 



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"0 COME ALL YE FATTrTFl L!" 

(Jul Scout Christmas Chorus singing Carols at Filene's under the direction of Mary Kanton Withani. 
Mis. Witham trained the choristers who sang each day at Filene's the week before Christmas. Scouts 
from the sixth grade up were eligible. Miss Grace Norian, the accompanist, is shown at the Wurlitzcr 
organ with Mrs. Barbara Metcalf, the Scout Executive. 



37 

In a second mid-vacation game, j 
the girls' Varsity and second team 
went to St. Charles in Woburn, 1 
Thursday morning, December 28. 
There, on a floor smaller by half 
than their home floor, the Var- 
sity succumbed MS - 37 
valiantly after being 
lehind by S points f..i 



atching up 
■insistently 
the first 3 



quarters of the game. Jean Neiley 
and Bette Kneeland were high 
scorers for Winchester with 16 
points apiece. Proving the floor 
was no obstacle to them, the sec- 
ond team triumphed 20 - 0 in a 
game which amounted to a half in 
respect to time, but which was well- 
played and very clean as neither 
team chalked up a foul. 

The line-ups were as follows: 
St. Charles Varsity- 
Pis. 

Mulronan, rf H 
Joyce. If .s 

Clancy, If i; 




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interesting and enlightening experience. 



MOODY MOTOR SALES, INC 



Foley. If 
Duran, cf 
MacDonald, 
t louthro, rg 
Harrigan, lg 
Flaherty, eg 



rg 



Winchester Varsity 



Damon, i f 
Lanigan, rf 
Morton, rf 
Xeilev. If 



cf 
rg 



Chiswell, 
Smith, rg 
Hawkins, lg 
Collins, lg 
MacDonald. eg 



St. Charlc*. Jayvees 



Morrison, rf 
Doherty, If 
McLaughlin, 
Lftlly, cf 
Dango, cf 
MacManus, rg 
Gonsalvas, lg 
Sullivan, eg 
Dulong, eg 



If 



Winchester Jayvess 



i Morton, rf 
Dasehbach, rf 
O'Connell, If 
Lanigan, cf 
Crockett, cf 
Stevens, rg 
Snell. lg 
Easton, eg 



(i 

16 
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(IBOl'P NEW 
PARTY 



V EAR'S 



Among the gala New Year's Eve 
celebrations was a progressive 
dinner party given at the homes 
of Diane Gulaker, Allen road; Sally 
Carlisle, Sargent road: Jimmy 
Jones. Ledyard road; George Bai 
baro, Euclid avenue; and Bill Mur- 
ray, Highland avenue. 

The group included: Jeanne 
Wilde. Seotty Wallace; Diane 
Gulaker, Bill Murray; Suzanne 
Seckel of Watei town, J i m m y 
Jones; Sally Carlisle, Jack Kit- 
ko of Cleveland, Dhio; Alice Lucy 
of Belmont, George Barbaro; Phyl- 
lis Bronnnn of Belmont; Ned 
Moore, Joan Garvin of Belmont; 
Paul Coddett. 

They later returned to Jimmy 
Jones' :o watch the old year out 
and the new year in. 



\MICO ON C N BE 
II WII'SHIKK 



VTEN NEW 
EROSH 



Among the first string backs ori 
the undefeated and untied Univer- 
sity of New Hampshire freshman 
football squad this fall was Paul 
Amico, former Winchester High 
star fullback and Captain of the 
I'M!" team. 

Paul played fullback on the of- 
fense and halfback on the defense 
tor Coach Peppei Martin's un- 
beaten eleven. The Kittens defeated 
N e w Hampton, Bates Erosh, 
Brewster, and marred otherwise un- 
blemished slates for Tilton School 
and Phillips Exeter. 

Paul is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Anthony Amico of 334 Cross street, 
Winchester. A major in chemistry 
he stood well up in his class at the 
first marking period. 



Everybody's Saying 
The NICEST Things 

aboul -'nth Con tun Bread. Vtul well lliej -hould 
for it'- the bur-! bread that <|iialit\ ingredients and 
master baking cm produce . . . a-k for it l>\ name 
at your Independent grocer*. You. ton. will low the 
flavor uf 

20th CENTURY BREAD 

Other Famous 20th Centun FoouV: 
20th CENTURY 20th CENTURY 

ENGLISH MUFFINS DOUGHNUTS 

and the tino-t roll- of their kind: 

20th CENTURY BROWN n SERVE 
HOT ROLLS 

ijusl I'm Them In The Oven Read\ in 7 Minutes i 



632 Main Street, Winchester, Mass. 



Tel. Wl 6-3133 



BEAT 

OLD MAN WINTER 

VISIT OUR SERVICE DEPT. FOR 
SAFE DRIVING 



Your Cadillac and Pontiac Dealer 
Sales & Service 

Moody Motor Sales 

Inc. 

632 Main St. Winchester, Mass. 

TEL Winchester 6-3133 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR, FRIDAY. JANUARY 5, 1951 



The Winchester Star 

( Established 1^0) 

ST A It BUILDING 
3 ( HUR< II STREET 

WINCHESTER, MASS. 
Theodore I*. Wilson 
Editor and Publisher 

Published Ever) Friday 

MNU.h < OI'ILS. TEN < FATS 
Left at Your Residence for 1 Year 
The Winchester Star. 82.50 in 
\d\ ance. 

News Items, Lodge Meetings, So- 
ciety Events, Personals, etc., sent 
to this office will be welcomed by 
the Editor. 



fwiNC.HESTfR] C IT 50ES SfflA) 
^To If I 

NoiSE ! ' 




its *fT t , r ,,e o'cmk 
»iv vol ft * * e To c-o 

Vv«, !» TH*' -' r ' 

iCrtii Of "P<m<E L 



A V f N >. f 



C-eTT ,» c 



HOW ABOUT it? \ 
CAN ¥01 HE»S f 



if PIS 11HAVVAV 
C*KT MAkt F1 M t «K 

NO PNE CAN; 



Km 



iffic* at Wi 
inafi-r. 



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1 V©u TcR OF T ' Y»H -s 
/ Cant SH'oT a fci n in «. 
I W INC HE VTE.R AN'. r)u*8 

J'lL O'vA* r h ' K) * 



The W inehester Star assume- no 
financial responstbilit} for typo- 
graphical error- in advertisements 
but will publish without charge ;i 
correction in the next issue, or re- 
publish that portion of the adver- 
tisement which is incorrect. 

Telephone Winchester d-W)2'.i 



Only Newspaper 
Printed In Winchester 

Serving the Community for 
70 ^ ears 

Largest Sworn Circulation 



A'.f 



4^ 



THE OAIT 

SIT£ 
IN TCwN 

WHICH 
Wit i. 



S.vi i&TY EveHv QNt 





TIKE 



yo v .see th e i 

WHiTFS OF TNfiK "^CS 

Eyes. HAH» y' ^ 



i Represent inn Winchester j 

' I 

| Senators in < ongress I 
• Leverctt Snltonstall j 

I Hi nry Cabot Lodge, Jr j 

| Congressman, "th District | 

I Edith Nourso Rogers j 

I Senator fith Middlesex | 
District | 

' Harris S. Richardson ^ 

Representative in General • 
I Court 

I Harrison Chadwick 

I County Commissioner 
I James A. Cullen 

It appears We are to have a 
special town meeting to consider 
again the school questions recently 
defeated l>y close margins at last 
week's referendum. Some will de- 
plore this procedure, others will 
hail it, and many others will wonder 
why such action has to be taken so 
soon with the annual March Town 
Meeting coming in the near future. 
School proponents believe a special 
town meeting can serve a useful 
purpose in the further considera- 
tion of providing adequate facil- 
ities for the town's high and junior 
high pupils. In support of this opin- 
ion they say that at a special town 
meeting for the express purpose of 
considering the school proposals 
there will be adequate opportunity 
to discuss fully these controversial 
questions, which might not be pro- 
vided at a regular town meeting 
with a lengthy docket of articles. 
The School Building Committee is 
quoted as hoping those who opposed 
their plans which were passed by 
the special meeting in November 
will attend the heating: they have 
called for next Tuesday evening at 
the town hall and present their ob- 
jections. They also hope anyone 
with questions, or objections to the 
plans a- they have been presented 
will feel tree to discuss their views 
with the committee, either at heat- 
ings tn be held in m private. We be- 
lieve most people in town echo 
these hopes, The burden of proof 
would now seem to lie with the 
opponents of the school plans. What 
have they to propose: what do they 
think should be dune'.' 1 In what way 
should the plan- be changed, plans 
which had the backing of t h e 
School Building Committee, the 

School Committee, the Hoard of 
Selectmen, the Finance Committee 
and the Planning Hoard? Surely 
someone must have some pretty 
strong negative views of plans to 
oppose backing such as this! 
whether hearings and a special 
town meeting can accomplish much 
in straightening out the present 
impasse will depend in large meas- 
ure upon the attitude with which 
both sides approach them. If there 
is a genuine desire on the part of 
the school proponents to meet the 
objections to their plans expressed 
by the leaders of the recent suc- 
cessful referendum, we may get 
somewhere at the coming special 
meeting- By the same token those 
who have opposed the school plans 
should be willing to offer construc- 
tive, and not wholly destructive 
criticism, if progress is to be made! 
A little give and take on both sides 
with the guarding of tempers and 
the idea that we all want to work 
for what is best for Winchester can 
accomplish a lot. Any "1'apa- 
Knows-Hest" attitude by either 
side will doom the whole attempt 
to solve our pressing secondary 
school problem to failure! 



1 pJ - 

- , . ji If 
.'.•—> 




( HfltO. HELLO ! IS ~N 
T»i^ rtevv Yosn ? C-ouD 1 s 

WE'RE StUDlNt A SCMC5I-' 
\HEKE 'H V»l«CN£STt I?, t-*-^ 
»NP VlfSE WONtFRiNtjJ ijm 
IF YOI CAN 
OtCil Scots 

T> ten c 
yo<£ « fc w i 
( WANT 



if The 

appalac h'an j 

SITE IS 

chose n, the 

1 PICOlN SCHOOL W'lL k'S L.ONHR HAVE EXCLUSIVE EVVlMMlNfr FACILITIES ' 




fit ^ 
/ .A- 

The a?pal-a ch-i*n 

SITE IS. StlRE TO GIVE 7HF 

Water Board A Gcov TiME 



J, 



1 Hf I LO, -s 
y'TolKS HtKF 

AO A iN ' 



vfȴ HCT 
C-E T E»T>E?T 

AEVif E 7 



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-gioviK into ■ - 

THt i'« ui^«-i x 



LOOK WHAT ED FOUND! 



Editor of the Star: 

Look what I found among my 
prize clippings from the Winches- 
I tei Star of March "JO. 1925. 
j Tw enty-five years ago the citizens 
of the tow n were in an uproar about 
j the location of the Washington and 
Lincoln schools. There was a great 
deal of objection to the location of 
the Washington School because it 
was so near to the reservoirs and 
the Lincoln School was to be located 

enlarged. I also looked at the i 
architect's version of the remodeled 
Junior High School; the addition of 
completely modern wings on a 
Georgian building was an indica- 
tion to me of how little care had 
been put into the planning: to me 
this preliminary sketch was revol- 
ting — - the poorest piece of sales- 
manship I have seen in many years. 

My suggestion to the school com- 
Imittee, ami all interested parties, 
j is that a complete synopsis be 
I drawn up, showing needs of ele- 
| mentary schools, junior high school, 
and senior high school for the next 
i twenty years — as reliably as sta- 
tistical methods permit, and that 
| a definite program for the meet- 
! ing of these needs be formulated 
with complete plans, builders' esti- 
mates, etc, with optional plans 
from competitive architects. In- 
cluded also there should be the num- 
| her of extra teachers and admini- 
strative personnel with the addi- 
tional annual salaries (lumped) 
j projected into the picture. Then the 
committee should present the over- 
all effect of these project- on the 
| tax rate without trying to cover up 
anything; the entire atmosphere 
to date appears to me and to 
'others with whom I have talked 
to be one in which it is necessary 
to "slip something over" on the 
town meeting, "or we'll never get 
the appropriation!" 1 have enough 
confidence in Winchester to feel 
that any actual needs of the chil- 
dren will be met; attempts to sad- 
dle taxpayers with graft, extra high 
costs foi standard equipment, etc., 
will be resisted, and properly so. I 
felt that the original town-meeting 
vote wa- a result of an attempt to 
save the town money in the im- 
mediate future without proper 
thought for what might happen in 
the next few years. 

So, let's cut out the horse-trad- 
ing, the pitting of precinct against 
precinct, and conic out with a care- 
fully conceived plan to meet the 
heeds of all sections of town, all 
age-groups of children, and let 
some honest competition among ar- 
chitects and builders bring the costs 
as low as possible. 

Very truly yours, 
Edwin B. Marshall 
173 Forest street 



in a depression on Westley street 
which was usually full of water. 
Both locations had their faults but 
both were chosen and a lot of hot 
air was wasted. They have served 
for the last twenty-five years and 
appear to he in good condition. 

The Washington School will soon 
have to have a large addition. There 
are now three real estate develop- 
ments contemplated in the north 
end of the town which will be 

MISS WAGNER RED CROSS 
WORKER ABROAD 



W \NTS NEW SCHOOL PL w 



Ldttor of tin 
As a fat I 
child and a 
next yeai . I 
my thoughts 
culminating 



■ Star: 

ier of one school-age 
second one to enter 

am writing to express 
on the recent fiasco 

in a "No" vote on the 



ichool committee's plans. 1 am one 
who voted "No," not because I do 
not believe in proper facilities for 
the children in all age groups, but 
because I felt that the planning 
was far too sketchy, and that it 
ignored completely other problems 
in the school system, creating a fear 
that, having acquiesced in the sec- 
ondary school planning, we would 
shortly receive a further shock 
when the needs of the elementary 
schools had to be met. 

1 heard Mr. Jellison speak on 
the subject of secondary schools 
at the Fathers' Night meeting at 
, the Washington School; he dropped 
a vague hint of things to come in 
pointing out that the Parkhurst 
School had already become inade- 
quate, and that it was admitted that 
the Washington School had to be 



CHKISTM \S TREE DISPOSAL 

The Star has been asked by Fire 
Chief James E. Callahan to repeat 
its pro-Christmas warning, not to 
give old dry Christmas trees to 
children to convert into dangerous 
bonfires. Have the trees taken to 
the town dump, Potentially bad 
fires are started each year as chil- 
dren pile up discarded Christmas 
trees and burn them, often in places 
entirely unsuitable. The danger to 
property aside, there is the even 
greater possibility that some child 
or group of children may get bad- 
ly burned in playing with these 
highly inflammable trees. Don't 
give your old Christmas tree or 
wreaths to children at the door. 
Dispose of them properly and safe- 

i ly! 

ENGAGEMENT 

Mr. and Mrs. William P. Helms 
of West Newton announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Ma- 
rion Elizabeth, to Mr. Alfred Pres- 
ton Lee of Newton, son of Mr. and 
Mrs Charles S. Lee of Maiden 
Bridge, N. Y., formerly of Win- 
chester. 

Miss Helms is a graduate of the 
i Mary A. Burnhani School, Brad- 
ford Junior College and the Katha- 
rine Gibbs School, Mr. Lee pre- 
pared at the Browne and Nichols 
School and is a graduate of Bow- 
doin College where he was a mem- 
ber of the Delta Upsilon fraternity. 
During World War II he served as 
a lieutenant with the Navy Air 
Corps in the Pacific area. 



Word was received last week 
through the American Red Cross 
that Meredith Brew ster Wagner of 
Crescent r o a d had arrived at 
Bremerhaven, Germany, enroute to 
Esslingen for assignment as a re- 
creational worker to some hospital 
for men in service, in which type of 
work overseas only Red Cross 
I workers are used 

After a year on the islands of 
Oahu, Hawaii and Maui in 1945 - 
| 1946, doing recreational work in 
clubs for the G. I.'s, and a short 
rest at home, Miss Wagner was re- 
turned in January, 1947 for such 
' service to Ascom City, near In- 
chon in Korea. Five months later, 
[when all Red Cross dubs were 
i turned over to Special Services, 
she became an Aimy Hostess and 
was assistant club director of the 
CSAFIK information center in 
! Seoul, taking service men on tours 
to nearby shrines and points of 
| interest. 

Later for six months she served 
as a radio announcer and script 
w i iter in station WVTP ( Armed 
Forces Radio) in Seoul, represent- 
ing the Army Hostess Corps. Dur- 
ing her last month in Korea she was 
assigned to the Uijnngbu service 
club, and with another Hostess also 
made clubmobile inns to the ::sth 
' Parallel, to provide recreational en- 
tertainment foi the enlisted men on 
border patrol. 

In December, 194*. when most 
of the C. S. forces were pulled out 
of Korea and the State Department 
took over, Miss Wagner rejoined 
the Red Cross and was flown to 
Japan, where she served as a re- 
creational worker at the ll*th Sta- 
tion Hospital (Army i in Fukuoka, 
Kyushu. Japan until she left for 
home last April. After the Korean 
war began in June, most of the 
casualties passed through this hos- 
pital from Pusan. Korea, until the 
Kimpo airfield at Seoul was final- 
| ly recaptured after the landing at 
Inchon. 

In May and .Line of 1948, dur- 
ing her accumulated leave. Miss 
Wagner was fortunate enough to 
: have been able to fly as far as 
Bangkok, Siam, visiting Canton. 
Hong Kong and Shanghai enroute: 
and while in Japan covered most of 
! the 1500 miles of the Japanese is- 
' lands, also. 

MASONS HELD NEW YEAR'S 
OPEN HOUSE 



served by the Washington School. 
If building is not halted by war 
conditions we may look forward 
to a much larger school population 
in this district. 

Now let's get together and stop 
quarreling like a lot of kids and at 
the next annual Town Meeting set- 
tle the Junior and Senior High 
School problem. The suggested 
plans by the Committee appeal to a 
large percentage of the citizens. 

PROF. WHATMOt GH ELECTED 

Joshua Whatmough Professor of 
Comparative Philology in Harvard 
University, has been elected Pres- 
ident of the Linguistic Society of 
America for the year 1951. The 
society is concerned with the 
scientific study of languages. The 
election was held at the recent an- 
nual meeting of the society in 
( 'hicago. 

Professor Whatmough, a native 
! of Lancashire, England, studied 
and taught in England, Wales and 
Egypt before coming to the United 
States in 192*! as Chairman of the 
Department of Comparative Philo- 
logy at Harvard. He is the author 
of several works on early Roman 
languages and culture, and his 
most recent study is "Dialects of 
Ancient Caul" (1949). He also 
was the editor foi many years of 
Harvard Studies in classical Philo- 
logy, 

lie lives at 17 Central street, 
Winchester, Mas-. 

ENG \GEMENT VNNOUNCED 



There are only a few criticisms by 
the objectors and these can be 
adjusted so that everyone should be 
satisfied. Let's spend our time 
ironing out this situation and be 
ready to pass the matter at the 
next regular meeting. In my opin- 
ion a special Town Meeting so near 
the regular Meeting would pre- 
pudice a great many people against 
the whole matter. 

Ed Sanderson 
NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 

Harry Easton, former Winches- 
ter High School track and football 
star, is one of the candidates for 
king of the 30th annual winter 
carnival at University of Maine 
to be held Friday, Saturday and 
Sunday, January 12, n and 14, 
Harry is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry M. Easton of Seneca mad. 

Edward S. Mansfield of 15 Cabot 
street, and Brenda M. Dissel of ,T 
Madison avenue west have been re- 
appointed Notary Publics by Gov- 
ernor Paul A. Dover and confirmed 
by the Executive Council. Their 
terms will expire in 1957. 

Barry Newman, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Carl Newman of 8 Fenwick 
road was one of 4f?0 Brandeis Uni- 
versity students recently home for 
the 12 day winter recess. A mem- 
ber of the pioneering class of 1952 
at two-year-old Brandeis, Barry 
is on the student Social Commit- 
tee and appeared in Thornton Wil- 
der's "Oui Town" presented at tl\e 
University last spring. 



Mi. and Mrs. George W. Cary of 
of) Wildwood street announce the 
engagement of their daughter. Miss 
Virginia Bart let t Cary to Ensign 
Francis X. Quintan, son of Mr, 
John J. Quinlan of Reading. Vir- 
ginia attended Kendall Hall School 
and was graduated from Marycliff 
Vcadeniy and Mt. Ida Junior Col- 
lege, Ens. Quinlan graduated from 
Harvard with the class of 19S0 and 
is at pies. 'nt stationed in Norfolk, 
Va. 

TOWN BASKETBALL LEAGUE 
Standing January 3, 1951 

Won Lost 

MercUrio Insurance 1 0 
Bonnell Motors .". I 

Rotary :i l 

Bullets 1 3 

Sons of Italv 1 3 

All Stars I) 4 



CABBAGE UNDER STUDY 
FOR USE AS MEDK INK \S 
VEI L \S FOOD 



Jiggs the plebeian new-rich 
of comic strip fame — . is due these 
coming months for many a feast 
on his favorite dish of corned beef 
and cabbage. 

The 1950 autumn cabbage crop 

exceeded "fiO.OOO Ions, Mil per cent 

above last fall's output and 3fi per 
cent larger than average, notes the 
National Geographic Society. Such 
production indicates increased use 
of a vegetable long considered 
humble but, in fact, popular since 
many centuries before the birth of 
Christ. 

From the time of the early 
Egyptians (who are reputed to 





TO BANK WITH US 
BY MAIL 

You do not have to come to the 
bank to cio your hanking. When 
bad weather, illness, or lack of 
time make it inconvenient to bank 
in person, you can bank by mail 
just as well, and far easier — like 
writing a letter to a friend. 

Let us supply you with the deposit 
and witlnlraw.il forms and tell you 
Low EASY it is to bank by mail. 
We de-ire to help in every way to 
make our service convenient and 
useful to vou. 




Winchester National 

/ BANK 

/ WINCHESTER .MASSACHUSETTS 

MCMBCR PCOIRAL DEPOSIT INiURANCI CORPORATION 

Banking Hours 8:00 A. M. to 2:00 P. M. Daily 
Wednesday and Saturday S:00 A. M. to 12 Noon 



have worshipped the cabbage I 
down to the present day, this vege- 
table has been cultivated not only 
for its food value but also for its 
alleged medicinal properties. The 
Greeks believed it had the happy 
property of keeping a man clear- 
headed through banquets where 
wine flowed freely. The Romans, 
in MOO B. C, advised the use of 
mashed cabbage in the healing of 
wounds. 

According to modern scientists, 
the Romans may not have been far 
wrong. New studies of a germ- 
killing substance in cabbage indi- 
cate that it destroys, to some ex- 
tent, staphylococci, common germs 
in wounds. It also is believed to 
have a beneficial effect on some in- 
testinal bacteria. 

Celts Spread Cabbage 

Despite its long use, no one is 
quite sure Where the cabbage 
originated. Most evidence points 
to the eastern Mediterranean and 
Asia Minor, although the known 
ancestor of cultivated varieties — 
the wild or sea cabbage — is found 
today primarily along the chalk 
cliff- of England, and on the coasts 
of Denmark and northwestern 



France. 

The Celts, who invaded Mediter- 
ranean lands repeatedly from about 
fiOO B. C. to the Christian Era, are 
credited with the distribution and 
popularization of cabbage as a 
food plant. But the ancients ap- 
parently knew nothing of the head- 
ed variety which appears to have 
been developed in Europe after the 
death of Charlemagne in 814 A. D. 



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Several hundred Masons, rep- 
resenting William Parkman and 
Mystic Valley Lodges and Win- 
chester Royal Arch Chapter held 
their annual New Year's open 
house Monday at the town hall 
from 11 o'clock in the morning until 
1 p. m. Masons in Winchester, 
not affiliated with the Winchester 
bodies, and the sons of Masons 
were guests, together with sever- 
al Masonic officers from out-of- 
town. 

An entertainment program, open- 
ing selections by the ever-popular 
Mystic Glee Club, included selec- 
tions by Dan Skelton of "Old Man 
River" fame, dancing numbers by 
a sister-duo and an act by a come- 
dian w hich included the production 
of all sorts of inflated rubber ani- 
mals which were presented to the 
delighted kiddies. Light refresh- 
ments were served during the open 
house. 

Wor. W. Allan Wilde, past mas- 
ter of William Parkman Lodge, 
proposed the toast to the Grand 
Master. Dean Duncan, junior war- 
den of William Parkman Lodge, 
and Paul Shiverick, junior warden 
of Mystic Valley Lodge, were in 
charge of arrangements. 



FRATERNITY MEN AT M \INE 

Two Winchester boys. Richard 
H. Knight and Charles Goodnow, 
have recently been initiated into 
fraternities at University of Maine. 

Knight is a member' of Alpha 
Tau Omega and Goodnow, of 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

ENGAGEMENT 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Murphy of 
Kill y street, Wohurn. announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Dorothy Frances, to Mr. Frederick 
J. Doiiovaii. son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Timothy J. Donovan of Wendell 
street. 



•\ Classified Ad in the Star 
brings Results. 



LET US PLAN 




BUILDING LOTS 

$950 toS 1 .500 

12,400 sq. ft. to 17,000 sq. ft. 

3 10 of a mile to Washington 
School. 4 10 of a mile to 
Winchester Hospital. 300 ft. 
to Eastern Muss. Bus Stop. 
Reasonably priced for fu- 
ture building 



Call Exclusive Agent 
\I\rblebead 38J") from 
7 to 8 p. m. 



For Your Present Home 

RUTHERFORD EQUIPMENT CO. 

2A MT. VERNON STREET 
— KITCHEN SPECIALISTS - 

• Hotpoint Appliance* • Youngstown Sinks 

• Hoover Cleaners • Kitchen Maid Cabinets 

• Roper Gas Ranges a Maytag Washers 

During Alterations Caused By Fire 

Call Winchester 6-3061 or Winchester 6-0417 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR, FRIDAY. JANUARY 5. 1951 



5 



CLASSIFIED 

LOST AND FOUND 

LOST - Urty's Ronnon lighter in cas< 
in Ludit-!. washroom '.f T'.'wri Hail, O 
Election Day. fJi<l nut belong t.< loser 
of fir.-ut Sentimental value to nwner. K« 
Ward. Wi K.9HS9-J 

LOST CiirlV white fancj »h-« akttti 
bize 6; vicinity of Winter Pond, Find* 
[■lease cal. WI 6.1 -j :-\\ 



en' ices 



-I NDAV. JAM -\R\ 



THE LUTHERAN ( HL Rf H OF 
THE REDEEMER 



If.l 



SI. MARY'S CHURCH 



Montvale Ave., Woburn 



l ((l Mi 

Horse Tern 
like to fin 1 



<■!•-> angora eat in Black 
. last week Thursday. Would 
>me fro cat. Cal. W I 6.11*68 



Rev. Ralph Hjelm, Pastor 
U*-a. 118 Montvale Avenue 
Tel. Wo 2-30?* 



FOR SALE 



FOR SALE Regiitfivd i-orkei apal 
tmppies. $35 each. Call Wl «• 1 'J ::•.<• J 



FOR SALE 

tie h, I • '■< Cal 



«.lrl'- 
U 1 



l-M. 



FOR SACK Antique drum type 

Chinese table, Teak Mood, inlaid marble top 
wtih inlaid Mothei of pearl sides - i" 
Kndicott ltd . Stoneham • 



Morning Worship - 1! 00 A. M. 
Church School - 9:45 A. M. 

NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev, Virgesi Hill, Pastor. 

:;<> Pleasant View Avenue, Everett. 
•T. :. EVerett 3-0K36.il, 

10:45 a. TO, Morning Service. 

IMMACULATE CONCEPT10 N 
C ATHOI.K 1 HURCH 



machine 
US, cull 



FOR SAI.F. r . . washing 
ss-j, also work bench with vise 
W I 6-0'40-R aftei ii Pi M. 

FOR SALE \ charming 6 room single, 
two car garage and breezeway on Mam 
road in Winohe»ter ; also an adjoining 
corner lot, open to an offer and subject to 
prior sab- or use by owner, No Brokers 
please. Write Star Office Box I. -4 

FOR SALE 111 Plymouth sedan ir; 
excellent condition. Call Wl 6-3544 

FOR SALE 1950 Ford Custom Tudor, 
14,200 miles, over-drive, radio & heater, 
seat covers, undercoat, $1700, original 
owner, Wl 6-36S!) 



FOR SALE 1919 Ford '-' door custom 
sedan -.il.K5.un. H. 1. Etheridge, 16 Lloyd 
St., Tel. Winchester 6-14*3 jiiiif.-tf 

FOR SALE Saddle horse ribbon win- 
ner Ba> Mure at Rita Marie stables name 
Pan la. AK.i complete western tack. See 
John Farley at ttita Mane janVtf 

FOR SALE — Rebuilt washing machine 
and electric refrigerators, standard reliable 
niakes only. Oahm and hnckson Co., Inc. 
441 Mass Ave , Arlington. Tel. ARImgton 
b-482.) dy-tf 

FIREPLACE WOOD FOR SALE — 

Mostly oak, well seasoned, cut any length, 
delivered to cellar ; also kindling for sa.e. 
1. G. Walker, WAyland, 11* Ring 3. 

SeptH-tf 



Rev. Herbert K. A. Driscoll. Pastor 
Rev. Stephen E. Burke 

Masses at 7. »:45. 10 and 11:15. 

( III III II OF THE EPIPHANY 

Rev. Dwight W. Hadlrv, Rector. Rec- 
tify, 1 lilcngarry. Tel. Winchester 6-1264. 
Palish lluu-e. Trl. Winchester 6-1922. 

Sunday. January 7 

8:00 a. m. Holy Communion. 1 Corporate 
Communion of the confirmation das-- fol- 
! lowed by breakfast 1 

9:30 11. ' m. Church School. (Upper 
School I 

1 11:00 a. m. Holy Communion and Ser- 
mon 

11:00 a. m. Kindergarten anil Primary 
1 Departments 

Tuesday. January 9 

10:48 11. m. Holj Communion 
i 10:45 u. m. Council Meeting 

Sewing. Surgical Dressing. Church World 
! Service 

12 ::U) ir m. Luncheon 
1 Sunday, January 10 

sum p, m. Vestry meeting at the home of 
Mr. Francis K Booth, in Oxford street, 
Tuesday) January 9 

:t;i)0 p, m. Meeting of the Tuesday 
Luncheon Group at the home f .f Mrs. 
Heorge A Marks, 82 Foxcroft road. 



FIRST CONCRECATIONAL CHURCH 
1 1 0 Years of Service to Winchester 



PED. IRISH TERRIERS 

Male $:>0. Female $35. 

A. K. C. Hep. 3 months 
Champion Stock 

Hillen 91 West wood road 
SToneham 6-1782-W 



Rev Howard J. Chidley. D. D. Minister. 
1 Residence. Fernway. 

Rev. Donald B. Tnrr. S. T. P.. Assistant 
and Director of Religious Education, WI 6- 

I0RII 

,1. Albert Wilson, Orgnniat and Choir- 
master, Tel. M Vatic s-1972. 

Mrs. James F. Cnnning, Church See* 
I retnry, Wl 6-0328. 

Mrs. Donald B. Tarr, B. S. Assistant Di- 
1 rector of Religion i Education; Secretary, 
( Church School, Wl 0-1036 

Miss Klise A. Belcher, Executive Hostess 
Church, WI 6-1786: Home, WI 6-1545-W 



FOR SALE 



PRIVATE PARTY 
1949 NASH 
Ambassador Super ( dr. Sedan 
Radio & Heater. - new seat rovers, 
new Tires. Like New, - 20,000 
Original Miles. Best Offer for 
nuick Sale. 

8 Lawson Street. Wnhurn 
WOhurn 2.0H6I-K 



WANTED 



WANTED Part time work desired as 
typist, receptionist, switch hoard or cashier, 
experienced Cal: Wl B-3138-W 



WANTED Winchestei veteran wants 
to buy home, preferably near Wyman or 
Mystic School, Would consider 2-family. 
K.lward E. Hichborn. M Allien 4-6119 



WANTED Russell .) Taylor, well 

known Winchester paperhanger and inside 
painter wishes to add some new customers 
t" his list. For expert workmanship cull 
WI 6-0879-W. jan. r .-2t* 

W ANTED 1':,,: ..1' skis, 1 - 7 ft., ski 
boots, fiifa and ski poles - WOburn 2-1043-R 



WANTED Baby sitting Call Wl 6-2760 

W ANTED li.. you have an old cast- 
iron wood or coal-burning stove you want 
to get rid ..f or cheap, Wl B-0434-J * 

WANTED TO RENT — Furnished »>,..: 
minimum 3 bedrooms, heated Will pay 1 
SI0U to ¥ll-'» per mouth for one year. Call 
Wl 6-U'.'«-.l 

RENTAL W VNTED — " 01- n ore 
house, in good residential section, Highlarid 
avi'nue district preferred, for adult fami- 
I:. Write Star Office H„\ 1.-26. dec2°-4t« 



Next Sunday morning at in : 4 "> there will 
he Communion and Reception of New 
Members. Dr. Chidley wilt preach on "A 
New Year's Benediction.'' 

Church School Hours 

Intermediate and Junior High Depart- 
ments at 9:30, Kindergarten, Primary, and 
Junior Departments at 10:43. 

Senior Forum ai USUI in Ripley Chapel. 
The speaker will be Mis. Donald Tan on 

''Worship." 

Events of the Week 

Monday 

7:iiii P. M. - Boy Scout Meeting. Troop 
111. in Parish Hall 
Tuesday 

10:00 A M - Missi,,,, I'nion Guild Sew- 
ing in Kindergarten Room. 

12:011 Noon - Mission Union Guild Board 
Meeting 

1:00 P. M. - Mission I'nion Luncheon. 

2:00 P. M. - Mission I'nion Mi-eting in 
Ladies' Parlor. Guest speaker, Mrs. Ralph 
Shrader. on "Our Friendly Service Proj- 
ects." 

Wednesday 

7 :4f> P. M. - P.< sjness and Professional 
Women's Guild Meeting. Speaker. Mr. Paul 
K '.raves on "National Malnutrition." 

sum P. M - Orchestra Rehearsal at Mrs. 
Drake's Home. 6 Lagrange Street 

Thursday 

2:30 P. M. - Cirl Scout Meeting in Small 
Parish Hall 

. :45 P. M. - Senior Choir Rehearsal. 

8:00 P. M - Forum Advisors' Meeting in 
Church Office. 

Friday 

s :0 . I., n :00 P. M. - Forum Roller 
Skating Party 
Saturday 

"ii A. M - Junior Choir Rehearsal. 



Antiques Wanted 

Call Mr. Reebenacker 

A Reliable Dealer 
REading 2-1991 



MISCELLANEOUS 

SAGGING SPRINtiS — In upholstered 
furniture seats repaired and comp.etely 
restored to original position with SAO 
PRUlf Work done in your home. Divan 
I20 7l>; chair, J9.75. Written Lifetime 
guarantee. Quality Upholstering since 
1901. R. L. Woks & Suns Co. Call 
BEL 6-0991 jy9-tf 



UPHOLSTERING & CANE SKATING — 
For expert warn of all kinds. Cal Miss 
Davis. Wl 6-0616-M (formerly Hobby & 
Craft Nook i or P. & S Upholstery Co. AR1. 
6-lMs ja6-tf 



HELP — For »the Problem Drinker! 
There is a way out! Alcoholics Anonymous 
can show you! Write P. O. Box 10s. Win- 
chester, ja2U-tf 

TRAVEL INFORMATION — For reser- 
vations on Airplanes. Ships. Trains, and 
at Hotels anywhere in the United Stales 
or foreign countries Call your Author- 
ized Travel Agent, J F McGrath, Jr., 
Travel Service. WOburn 2-11234 or Win- 
chester 6-;; 130. nm-tf 



WEDDINti t AKES — When you want a 
real nice one. or a birthday cake that will 
thrill you. call a studio that makes a 
• penally of only the lust in party cakes 
of any kind. Delivery can be made. Te.. 
Eniiie Martinis. Central street, Woburn. 
W'Ph-.-n 2-:7:.. fii-tf 

HELP WANTED 

HOMES I'll 111 LP — I oi art Urne 
domestic help N irses Registry. Dcnnison 
Home Service ST B-1407-M declfMt* 

W ANTED Essential industry requires 
an intelligent man able t, meet and do 
business with the peop.e of tin- community . 
outdoor steady work, good income, .*, day 
week, not ovet ." Write Star Ot'fic* Bo> 
1.-2 



' Sun-lav. January 7 

! f' :3d a m. Church School. 

'■'. :< a. m. Brotherhood. Speaker: Dr. 
, Rolf EJiassen of Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. Subject : "Public Health." 
l0:4S a. ni. Nursery and Kindergarten. 
10:4a a. m. Morning Sanctuary Service. 
S.rmon by Mr. Bailey: "When Little Deeds 
are Mighty" Observance of the Lord's 
Suppei . 

4 :00 p m. Acceptance of gift from the 
ritlssetis of Ileruruulle. Belgium, in the High 
; School. 

6:'I0 p. m. Youth Fellowship. "An Even- 
ing on the Gold Coast." Speaker: Mr. Khou 
Akhar, a native of the Gold Coast of 
' Africa 

Mon lay . January S 

7 .uu p. m Hoy Scouts. Troop 7. in Re- 
creation Hal! 

Tuesday , January 9 

S:00 p. m Philathea (iuest Night in So- 
cial Hall nf Church. Mrs. Eleanor Foreman 
will present the fascinating story of 
; "Bonnets " Music by the High School Girls' 
Octette All women welcome. 

Wednesday, January 10 

7:47, p m. Committee on Christian Educa- 
tion in Church Parlor 

Thursday. Jam ary 1 1 

6:45 p. m. Youth Choir rehearsal 

7 ;S0 p m. Senior Choir rehearsal 

Friday, January 12 

7 :00 p. m. Cub Pack Meeting 



FIRST < HI Rf H OF CHRIST 
SCIENTIST. WINCHESTER 



Sunday Services at 11 a. m. 

S nday School is held at the same hour 

as the church service. 

Wednesday testimonial meeting 8 p. m. 

loading room. ,". Winchester Terrace 
.off Thompson Street'. Open dai:y ex- 
t.p: Sundays and huh. lays from 11 a. m. 
to 4 p. m. 



Rev. John P. O'Riordan, Pastor 

Assistants: Rev. Charles Anadore. 

Rev. Francis O'Neil and Rev. William 
Walsh. 



Mu ses at 7, 9. in, It and 11:50 a. m. 
Sunday School af'er the St o'clock Mass. 



•or of 



Robert A. Storer, Minister 
Mrs. Mary Ranton Witham, Dire 
.Music and Organist 

Mr-. Walter Smalley, Church Secretary. 
Church Telephone - Winchester 6-0'J49 



U 



Sd 



P. 

9:30 A. M 
vice . Meyer Chapel 

II :"» A. M L6\ 
Ha! . 

11 :"" A. M. Servi 
"I Swear " 

7 P. M Metcalf I'nion 



1 Worship Ser- 
Scbool - Lawrence 
f Worship. Sermon : 



.In 



Jan, 



t RAWI OKI) MEMORIAL METHODIST 
CHURCH 



< hoir Dlrectnr 

Morning Service - 10:1". a. m. 
Sunday School 

9:30 a. m. - Junior and Intermediate 

Depts. 

10:1.". a. m. - Nursery, Kindergarten, 
and Primary Drpls. 



Subject for the morning - The Art of 
Remembering and Forgetting 

At the Methodist Youth Fellowship plans 
will be made for the balance of the year. 

A ' I P. M. Members of the church will 
co-operate with other churches in a com- 
bined meeting at tin' high school in which 
people from Hemroillle where we pent 
sheets to aiil in meeting their needs, are to 
present a picture to each church. The 
public is invited to atteti !. 
This Week: 

Tuesday 

6:30 P. M. - Married Couples Club - 
Pot Luck Supper. Speaker. Jerry Poster. 
Subject - The Winchester Grade Crossing 
Situation. 

Thursday 

8:00 P. M. - W. S. C S. - Men's Nigh'. 
Speaker- Dr Emory S Bucke, editor of 
Zion s Herald. His subject will hi- - "A 
Look at the Mid-Century." Ten commit- 
tee vvid hi' the Hillside Group, 
Looking Ahead 

Monday. January 1 "i 

Methodist Social I'nion with Dr. Ralph 
Stoody as speaker. Make reservations by 
this coming Friday 

Thursday, January 1' 

Men's Club Annual Meeting. Please keep 
this date open as the meeting is very im- 
portant. 

SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Washington St. at Kenwin Rd. 
Key. John William Cook. Minister 
16 Kenwin Road 
Tel. Wl 6-0756-W 
Clinch Study, WI 6-1688 
Mrs. George Lorhmnn, Organist 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Corner Mt. Vernon and Washington 

I streets. 

Rev. Walter Loe Bailey, Minister. 
Residence: 15 Fairmount Street. Tele- 
phone Winchester 6-0427. 

W Lawrence Cook Organist and Director 
of .senior and Youth Choirs 

Mrs. Dana R. Perkins, Soloist and 
Director of Junior Choir 

John Hunt Chappie. Youth Director 
• • • 

Mrs 11. Stanley Kinsley, Church School 
Superintendent. 

Chu rch t >f f ice hours : 

Tin s lay and Wednesday mornings. 

Tel, phone Winchester 6-2s64. At other 
nmcs cull Mrs. L. E. Leavitt, WI 6-3062. 



Sunday. January 7 

9:45 a. m. Church School. Mrs. Rony 
Snyder, superintendent, Classes for ages 
3 to 23. 

11:110 a. m. Morning Worship. Mr. Cook 
will preach Sermon title: it Can Come 
Out Right" 

4 :0fl ji. m. Presentation of the pictures 
from Mcltrium to the churches of Winches- 
ter a' the high schoo'. 

5:30 a. m. Youth Group progressive 

suppei . 

6:30 p. m. Candlelight installation service 
for the officers of the Youth Group at the 

church. 

Activities fur the Week: 

Wednesday. January 10 

K:0fl p. m. The Mine Marthas will meet 
:.t the home of Mrs. Cordon I.orentzeii. M 
Forest Street. 

Thursday, January n 

7.011 p. ni. Tlie Chancel Choir will re- 
hearse at the church. 

Friday, January 12 
:30 p. m. The Junior 
hear-' Mt the chi rch. 

Saturday, January 13 

6 :,',<i p m. Bean Supper 
See members of the Mer 

tickets 

t nnnnt £ «ent* ; 

.laiiunrs IT, Annual Meeting at the 

church. 

January 25. A Night of Magic! 
February 7. Ash Wednesday Beginning 
of I'nion Lenten Service. 



Choir 



at the church, 
v Marthas for 



DEATH NOTICE 

COSTEI.LO - in Winchester, Jan- 
uary Rrd, Frances Theresa 
t Haley I, wife nf John J. Cos- 
tello. Funeral from her late 
residence, :i Mason street, Friday 
morning, followed by a solemn 
funeral mass at St. Mary's 
Church at 10 o'clock. Relatives 
and friends are invited. Inter- 
ment, Wildwood Cemetery. 



MF{S. TARR TO ADDRESS THE 
FORUM 



WANTED V 

ity, neat appearai 
f -r small cafeteria 
e-luOiV 



man pleasant perso 
ce, dependable, hoc 
. May live in. Call 



TO LET 



LOR RF N I i 

■ ithout garage WI U-19M 



i The Ten Commandments, basic rules for 
1 right human conduct through which 
i thought unfolds to the point of under- 
standing Cod will he considered at Chris- 
i linn Science services next Sunday. Title of 
the Lesson-Sermon is "God." 

The Gii'den Text i- from Paul's letter 
to Timothy: "Now unto the King eternal, 
j immortal, inv isible, the only wise God, be 
honour and glory for evei and ever" 1 1 
I Timothy 1:17 

j Headings from th< Bible .King James 
| Version i includes the First Command, 
jment: "Thou shall lav,- no othe 



go 



ir 



For HUNT - Fumishej room - avail- 
able for business man or woman - two 
minutes to center. Tel. Wl 6-07 SV 

ROOM FOR RFNT Near enter 62 
Vine street. Wl 6-0977. Woman preferred. 



This 
pa> 
id 11. 



■ lis 



us 



be- 

f i rther 



sai;. - 

alti: 



hi 

will k i 
r Fdiv 



it 



FOR RFNT 

hath. Private 

person. Near transportation. 'Call W I 6 



Furnished room with 
rntrance Single business 



I Mary Hake 
1 (owing paragraph 
\ giMid. unifies men 
j the brotherhood oi 
1 fills the Scripture 

ihvst'if ' shnthiiati 

. idolatry. - • whate 
I civil, criminal, i 
I coles . equalizes the sev*'s 
| on man. and 1 
1 suffer be puni 



Hie 



mpr 
hide 
nfin 



h' 
fol 



Its 



fli 



thy neighbor as 
n and Christian 
wrong in sis.".ai. 

and re Igto. > 
annu s the curse 
nothing that can sin. 
r destroyed" ip 840' 



FOR RF.NT Apt rooms and bath. 
$S0 p«'r month V. rite Sim Office Box 



STAR ADS 



BRING RESULTS 



The Church of the Open Bible 

i I'ndenominational 
Lords Day: S:J0 A.M.. Church-School: 
10:45 A.M.. Worship Service: 7:»« 
P.M., Gospel Service Rev. C. Helger- 
*on. Pastor. 

Thursday. 7:43 P.M.. Prayer Meeting. 

Montvale Ave., Woburn 



The Senior Forum of the First 
Congregational ('lunch will con- 
vene Sunday morning at 9:30 in 
Hipky Chapel when Mrs. Donald 
B. Tarr. Assistant Director of Re- 
ligious Education, will address 
them, centering their thinking 
around the subject of "Worship." 
The service as planned by Donald 
Cameron, Audrey ('lark, and Ricky 
Phippen, will he unusual in its ar- 
rangement. Donald Cameron will 
be the chaplain assisted by Daniel 
Blanchard. Ushers will he Roger 
Bainliridire and Kverett Combes, 
while the offering will he received 
hy Scott Cunningham and George 

| DeCamp. The Forum Choir w ill be 
on hand to sing, and the offertory 
w ill be played by Stephen Dunn and 
Kdwaid Tarr. trumpeters, 

Members of the Forum will be 
given the opportunity to sign up for 
the Forum Choir of till voices which 
is being planned for the first Sun- 

i day of National Youth Week, Jan- 
uary 28, when members of the 
Forum will have entire charge of 
the morning church service. This 
Sunday will also he International 
Sunday when 50 foreign students 
w ill he guests of the Forum for the 
week-end. 

A roller skating: party at the 
Bal-a-Roue is planned for the 
Forum on January 12. Cars leave 

i the church at 8:00 o'clock. 

Basketball for Forum starts 
Saturday. January ti with an out- 
standing- coach from B. U. Girls 
practice from 9:00 - 10:30. Bovs 
practice from 10:30 - 12:00. At 
12:00 those who are trying out for 
the Forum team will take the floor. 
New blue and white Forum uni- 
forms have been ordered and will be 
issued to 10 players very soon. The 

; basketball coach is hired by the 
church, to whom the Forum is very 

, grateful. 



POUO-A GROWING SHADOW 



WIM HESTER UNITARIAN CHTRCH 
Mystic Valley Parkway and Main Street 



Sun 'ay, January 7. 11*5 1 

lit) A. M. Junior Choir - Metcalf Union 



:C. A. M. - Motion Choir 
uu I". M. - Hoy Sects 
"•■ 1'. M - Alliance Meet- 



January 1:1 - S:0n 1'. M. - Couples' Club 
Dam e and Smorgasbord at Metcalf Hall 



CASES REPORTED SINCE 1936 
SHOWN IN 3-YEAR PERIODS 

* Including 1950 estimate o' 30 000 cases 

During the three-year period 1948-1950 
patient care alone co«t more than 
$58,000,000 in March of Dimes fundi. 





1934 38 1939 1941 I9«1944 



1945 1947 



1948 1950 



A FRIENDLY CHURCH AT THE 
FORK OF THE ROAD 

Rev. John Snonk. Jr., Minister. Rest- 
denre 30 Hi* St. - 6-0U9. 

W. Hnymnnd Chase, (leneral Supt. 

of the Sunday School 1 55 Cambridge St.. 

t.-.Hss 

Mr. Charlei I'. Potter. Organist and 



The chart above reveals polio's ever-increasing threat to the American 
people and the enormous cost of patient care borne by the National 
Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. This year, the forward march of 
polio presents an especially urgent problem to the March of Dimes: 
the purchasing value of the dollar has shrunk to 58 cents in compari- 
son with pre-war days, while polio cases have nearly quadrupled. 



MARCH <>F DIMES REPORT 

This year's Match of Dimes 
campaign will bo from January l"i- 
31. Last year Wiftchestei collected 
an approximate net of $3,389.00 an 
80'< increase over previous years. 
But th,. Polio Foundation paid out 
over $:i,2iin to stricken Winchestei 
polio patients in 1950. Thus Win- 
chester must strive to collect suf- 
ficient funds to be able to carry its 
own patients, beside its 50'; allot- 
ment to Polio Research, Many 
volunteer workers are needed this 
year for the campaign, If inter- 
ested call Mrs. Merrick at Win- 
chester 6-1744, 

Your committee this year is: Wo- 
men's Chairman Mis. <;. Moul- 
ton Horrick. 

Committee: 

Mrs. George Connors 
Mis. Charles Jellison 
Mis. Richard Bateman 
Mrs. Richard Carens 
Mrs. Sanborn Vincent 

House-to-House Chairman: Mis. 
T. Willard Carieton. 

Advance Special (iifts: Mrs, 
Henry Dellicker. 



CHAMOIS SKI (MB 



and Industrv 



dy, Mr. Lester 



Mr. 
Whit- 



- Mr. J. 

— Mr. 



( handler 
Vincent 



Hill. 
Am- 



(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 



•reived by 

Cards 
(iifts 



Com merce 
Patrick J. C 
taker. 

Publicity 

Treasurer 
brose. 

Movie Collection — Mr. Michael 
Stranger. 

Collections will be i 
the following means: 
( 1 I March of Dime: 
Special Persona 
Movie Collections 
Coin Collectors 
House to House Drive 
Townspeople are not expected to 
I give through more than one of the 
above channels The average col- 
1 lection in Middlesex County last 
year was IS'... cents per person, In 
Winchester the average was inc. 
cents. Let's piit Winchester on 
top for 1951. 

Harold S. Lewis 
Town Chairman 

SECOND CONGREGATIONAL 
CHI RCH 



With snow once more on the 
ground in our northern neighbor 
states, the Chamois Ski Club of 
Winchester at their January meet- 
ing drew up a calendar of events 
that should mean a good time for 
all. 

Jerry Hills. Chairman of the 
First Aid for the American Red 
Cross in Winchester, gave his time 
to outline the possibility of or- 
ganizing a disaster crew to be 
made up of club members, if called 
upon. Also we were told that reg- 
ular standard First Aid Courses 
would soon be starting and avail- 
able for till who are interested. 

The Club has started plans roll- 
inn; for another square dance, to 
be held Friday, February ninth, 
in the Town Hail. We have been 
fortunate in securing Al Smith 
once again to do the calling, and 
all of you who were there at the 
last dance will recall the splendid 
job he did. (Everyone is welcome, 
and for those that just want to 
watch, a few seats will be avail- 
able for that purpose. 

Following the square dance, 
plans are being made for another 
ski week end to be held February 
tenth and eleventh, which too 
should be a bang-up week-end. 
weather permitting. 

The next meeting will be held 
January thirty-first. 

In response to complaints from ! 
householders on Myrtle street and 
Mystic Valley Parkway Officer' 
William F. Cassidy dispersed a j 
group of boys who had been snow- j 
balling houses there. 




1951 
Christmas Club 
Still Open 

If you have not already joined our 1951 
( hristmas Club, corte in and enroll now. There is 
still time to take advantage of this opportunity 
to have a special fund of extra cash at the end of 
the year. 



Don't delay! Enroll now while the Club is still 
open. Next December, you'll be glad you joined! 

Winchester Trust Company 

35 CHURCH STREET • 16 MT. VERNON ST. 

WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

MEMBER FEDERAL OEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 

BANKING HOURS: 8 A. M. to 2 P. M. 
Except Wednesday and Saturday S A. M. to 12 Noon 



STAR ADS BRING 
RESULTS 



FOR ALL 

Automobile repairs on all make* 
of cars, call 

Christian W. Eriksen 

20 Grove Flure Winchester 
Wl 6-:tl92 

Sperinlizine on Huieks anil 
General Motor oars. 

ll tf 



MOFFETT 

TAXI SERVICE 

Winchester 6-1730 

mal3-tf 



FIREPLACE WOOD 

LOAM — MANURE 
Asphalt Driveways 
Chimney Repairing and 
.Masionvvork 

J. A. COSTANZA 
MEIrose 4-7812 noviT-tf 



GALUFFO S TAXI 

Weddings and Long Trips 
Special Rates 

TEL. Wl 6-0602 



ALLEN'S TAXI 

PROMPT DEPENDABLE 
SERVICE 

Call Winchester 6-0792 

aeptl-t* 



Harvey's Barber Shop 

Plenty of Parking Space 

Winchester Place 

opposite Police Station 



fs-tf 



LANE TAXI 
SERVICE 

Local ami distance trips 

Call Winchester 6-2580 



Although tin' Youth Group at the 
Second Congregational Church has 
been active since the first of Octo. 
ber, it has not yet been formally 
organized, After a progressive sup- 
per which will be held Sunday. Jan- 
uary 7 at 5:30, beginning at the 
home C»f Miss Shirley Farnham and 
• •nding at thi' home of Miss Natalie 
Anderson, the group will go to the 
church where it will he formally or- 
ganized as tin- Christian Endeavor 
Society of the Second Congrega- 
tional Church. Members of the 
group will take the pledge of the 
society and will become full mem- 
bers of the Christian Endeavor 
movement. The following officers 

' will be installed by the minister, the 
Rev, John W. Cook, at a candle- 
light service: president, Miss Shir- 
ley Farnham; secretary. Miss 
Natalie Anderson: treasurer, Mr. 

' Arthur Wallace. 

On January 14, the group will 

| go to the Dorr Memorial Methodist 
Church, Lynnhurst, to meet with 
the youth group of that church. 




CARPENTER 

I Specializing in small home 
i repairs 

ROY W. WILSON 

I -> Cliff st. wi 6-nixo-w 

I Bept29-tf 



C IOCM. T«ADt 



We never go to sleep on the job. 
Whether you have a large or small 
moving job — near or far — it will 
be done right. 



H.J.EMKINE^ 

A LINDEN tt-KINCHECTER.MAtt 

92£ 6*0568 

*4tt pkoht< Mtxr who mtvtf wki+ 



EMBASSY HAND 
LAUNDRY 

Complete Laundry and 
Dry Cleaning Service 

59.') Main Street 

Same Building as First Natl. 
Store Super Market 

For delivery call WI 6-2220 

septS- tf 



THE NEW 

WINCHESTER CAB 
TAXI 

Local and Lonjr Distance 
21 — HOCR SERVICE 

Earl C. .Ionian 

Phones 
Days - 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Winchester fi-19.11 

Nights - Sundays - Holidays 
W Inchcster fi-.l."iM3 

oet6-tf 




COUGHLIN JUNK CO. 



Rag«. Paper. Magailne* 
Metal 

Tel. Winchester 6-2040 

ma6-tf 



The RIGHT TOY for the RIGHT AGE 




Skis, Hockey Sticks and Equipment 
Double runner skates 

Open Daily 9:30 A. M. to 5:30 P. M. 
Friday until 9 P. M. 

GENBILL TOY STORE 

282 Washington St.. Winchester, i near Winchester Arms 

Apartment, i 

Lionel arui American Flyer sets and iccessories 

Main ?tore MELROSE opp. Ell Pond Melrose -tore Open 
Friday and Saturday until 9 P. M. 
Member of National Toy Guidance Council 
The Largest Year Round Selection of Toys Morth of Boston 




Dr. Ruth A. Boule 

Chiropodist — Podiatrist 

50 VINE ST. WINCHESTER 
i opposite Winrhenter Theatre! 
Houra by Appointment Only 

Tel. Winchester 6-1989 



FLOORS 

NEW FLOORS LAID 
OLD ONES RESURFACED 

MERENDA FLOOR CO. 

Tel. Winchester 6-1771 or 
Winchester 6-:il2.{ 



WILLIAM HLANCHARD 

CO., INC. 
Awnings Tents 
Venetians Hlinds Shades 
Tel. CRystal 9-0379 
436 Main St., Waketield 

maia-tf 



SERIES "7 
OIL BURNER 

$297.°° 

COMPLETELY IN- I UXED 

W e remove and 
credit your coal 

Phone WOburn 2-0800 
CUMHINGS & CHUTE INC. 

Established 1888 
3 High Street Woburn 



Thomas Qu/g.ey, Jr. 

( ON TRACTORS 
CEMENT AND STONE MASON 
MO! OK TKANhPOKTATION 
Power .->hc,»el Air I <.iti|>reaaor 

Koad Holler Drilling 

Concrete Mixer lilaating 
Tractor Kork hiraeatim 



WINCHESTER'S 

JUNK DEALER 

HIGHEST PRICES PAID 

Call Ed. Murphy 

TEL Wl 6-1346-M 



M ACE FIELD 

hand wrought 
jewelry and silver 
10 Winchester place 
wi 6-2989 

in-* 



6 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY; JANUARY 5, 1951 




GUILD OF THE INFANT 
SAVIOUR 



LIBRARY ACTIVITIES 



(HKISTMAS 



(Left to riuht) Catharine (loss, Nancy Dowiing, 
Nurse, Mary Murray. In front with children, Santa 
Sarah Fitzgerald. 



HEALTH CENTER 



Susan ' lark, Mrs. Alice V. Murray, Board of Health 
Mi. Frank E. Crawford). Seated in Santa's lap, 



At the Christmas Party held December 10 at the 
received erifts from Santa Claus through the work of 
girls made bean hairs, stockings, animals, cookies, 
who attend tin- clinic. 



Board of Health office pie-school clinic children 
Too Winchester Girl Scouts and Brownies. The 
nee ornaments, and dressed dolls for 150 children 




WOMEN'S UE1M BLK AN CLUB 

The Women's Republican Club of 
Winchester will hold its next meet- 
ing on Wednesday, January 10th at 
2:30 p. m. in the Masonic Hall. 

The Club is most fortunate in 
securing as speaker Mr. Daniel 
Tyler, Jr., of Brookline. Mr. Tyler 
is the energetic chairman of the 
Republ ican State Committee, 

His subject will be "How to win 
the next election". Mr. Tyler is 
ably qualified to speak on this sub- 
ject for he has been active for ten 
years working in various positions 
for the state. He is a trained busi- 
nessman, an aggressive organizer 
with a dynamic personality. He 
has never been a "Treadmill Re- 
publican" and his progressive 
ideas should be well worth hearing. 

Following the program, Tea will 
be served by the Hospitality Com- 
mittee, of which Mr. Donald F. 
Connors is the capable chairman. 

In the absence of the President, 
Mrs. .1-. Stanley Barnes the meeting 
will be conducted by the 1st Vice- 
President, Mis." Theodore C. 
Browne. 

It is hoped a large attendance 
will be present to greet Mr. Tyler 
and usher in a happier and more 
successful 1951. 

N EW ( I B I' VCK FORMED 



WINCHESTER 
TOASTMISTRESS < LIB 

The Winchester Toastmistress 
Club will hold a Public Relations 
Meeting at. the Woburn Public Li- 
brary, Pleasant street, on Tuesday 
[evening, January at 8 o'clock. 

Mis. Margaret Quirk of Woburn, 
Public Relations Chairman, who 
j was bom in Woburn. as w ell as her 
parents, is in charge of the pro- 
gram which has been tin ned over to 
I her by Mrs. Alice Coldwell of 
Brookline, the regular Program 
! ( 'hairman. 

Mayor Francis H. Murray, Jr. of 
Woburn will be the truest speaker 
and tell us about the value of com- 
munity leaders, including toast- 
mistresses to public officials. 

Miss Clara Botwell, Woburn li- 
brarian, who is an authoress and 
well known in the community for 
her puppet and marionette shows, 
will give a talk on the Woburn Li- 
brary and its work. 

Mrs. Quirk will give a ten-min- 
ute resume on the "History of 
Toastmistress," and Miss Hilda 
Hope of Winchester, Junior Past 
President, will give a ten-minute 
talk on "Objectives of Toastmis- 
tress." 

There will be a short business 
meeting following this program. 



WINCHESTER HISTORICAL 
SOCIETY 



Baj State Historical Society 



Members of the Winchester His- 
torical Society aie eligible to at- 
tend the Winter Meeting of the 
Bay Statu League at Boston Uni- 
versity, 725 Commonwealth ave- 
nue, Boston on Saturday, January 
L'H at "J p. m. at Speare Hall. 

The program is as follows: 
From 12:45 - '_' p. m. visit Ameri- 
can History Room, Treasure Room 

exhibits, and Daniel I.. Marsh 
Chapel. Business meeting at '2 to 
2:30, Greetings from Dr. Marsh, 
and Address on "Boston Men and 
the Winning of the American In- 
dependence" b y Dr. Robert E. 
Moody, Professor of History of 
Boston University. Tea will be 
served at Refectory, School of 
Theology. Guides will be stationed 
at various points of interest. 

Transportation: Any Common- 
wealth avenue car from Park street 
sUbway to St. Mary's street ear 
stops directly in front of the T'ni 
verslty. Automobiles may be 
parked in the State road. 



Welcome to 1951! Our first 
event of the new year will be a 
Dessert Bridge Party to be held at 
the Town Line in Woburn on 
Thursday, January 11th at 1:80 
p. m. with the following committee 
in charge: Mis. Manlino G. Moffett 
and Mrs, Clarence Dunbury, Co. 
Chairmen, assisted by Mrs. Fred 
II. Brigham, Mrs. J. Frank Davis, 
Mrs. I K Frank Dineen, Mrs. Joseph 
Dowiing, Mis. B. Robert Finn, Mis. 
Herbert Graves, Mi-. Frank P. 
Hurlev, Mrs. Edward McGrath, 
Mrs. John II. Mellaie, Mis. George 
F. Morrissey, Mr.-. R, E. Muehlig, 
Mi-. Augustine Ottiano, Mrs. 
Dominic Runei, Mrs. G. W. Ryerson 
and Mrs. John J. Walsh. 

The committee has worked long 
and hard to make this one of the 
niec-t parties of the year, with 
plans for a delicious dessert and 
most atti active prizes. Plan now 
to be present and bring along your 
friends. Anyone needing trans- 
portation to the Town Line for this 
party may have the same by call- 
ing our Transportation Chairman, 
Mrs. Kmilio D'Errico, at Winches- 
ter 6-2825. 

On Tuesday, January 9th, at 
2:00 p. m. the Boston Chapter of 
the Guild of the Infant Saviour 
will hold its Forty-fourth Anni- 
versary Tea at the Hotel Statler 
with Constielo Azuola, guest speak- 
er. You are all cordially invited to 
attend. 

Our meeting on January 23rd 
will be a regular sewing meeting 
and this will be held in Masonic 
Hall. 

And, now, Happy New Year 
everyone. We'll see you at the 

bridge. 



WINCHESTER 
GARDEN 



HOME AND 
CLUB 



The 
chestci 
will be 

uary l 
ter 1 

will has 



Win- 
Club 
Jan- 



first meeting of the 
II i une and Garden 
! held on Wednesday, 
7 at 2 p. m, at the Winches- 
rary. Mrs. Norman Mitchell 
timely Horticultural sug- 



gestions. One of our own mem- 
bers. Mis. John Chipman will show 
kodachrome slides of her trip to 
the West Coast called "Botanizing 
from an Automobile." 

The Flower Arrangement Class 
will meet on Thursday, January 11 
at the home of Mrs. Gray, and 
members of the class are asked to 
bring primary placements. 

The Misses Eleanor and Louise 
Bancroft have returned home after 
spending a few days during the 
holidays in New York City. 



A new Cub Scout Pack, Pack No. 
9 of the Fellsland Council, has been 
formed at the George Washington 
School. Although sponsored by 
the George Washington Dads' Club 
member-hip is open to all boys of 
Cub age regardless of school' affi- 
liation. 

The first regular meeting of the 
Pack will be he!. I at 7:30 Friday 
evening, January 12 at the school. 

Those boys already registered 
have bet n formed into dens under 
den mothers as follows: 
Den No. 1 

Den Mothers Mrs. Louis Bra- 
vacos. Mrs. Donald Campbell. 

Members R li eft < lardner, 
James Bravacos, James Reynolds, 
Carl Segerstrom, Albert Dueharmo, 
Richard Crockford and Donald 
Campbell. 

Den No. 2 

Den Mothers Mrs. Henry Ful- 
ton, Mrs. William I.ayton. 

Members John Hovarth, Wil- 
liam Dayton, Gregg Wood, Kenneth 
Fulton, Geoffrey McGraw, and Wil- 
liam Swett. 

Den No. 3 

Den Mothers — Mrs. Henry 
Fitts, Mrs. Fussell Loafe. 

Members Kim Harris, David 
l.eafe. Richard Watkins, Geoffrey 
Johnson, William Fitts, Scott Car 
ver. 

The Pack Committee consists of 
the following men: 

Ben Marshall Chairman 
Louis Bravacos -— Cubmaster 
Frank Carver 
Henry Fitts 
Robert Gardner 

Russell l.eafe 
Francis Parsons 
Russell l.eafe 
Any other boys of Cub age who 
are interested in joining Pack 9 are 
invited to be present, with their 
parents, at the January 12 meet- 
ing. 



BAPTIST ALL CHURCH SOCIAL 

Tonight, Friday, J anuary 5th, is 
the time for the January all church 
Social at the First Baptist Church. 
] The program for the evening will 
1 follow along the lines of the very 
■ popular December affair, with com- 
munity singing, games and square 
dancing, This type of program is 
| being repeated by popular demand. 
Come and enjoy an old-fashioned 
; evening of fun. 



Be the Lucky one in Nineteen Fifty One" 

to call Mr. Reebenacker auctioneer, appraiser, and 
expert attic Inspector 

l( Mm have old china, da", clocks, old furniture. 
Singer Scwinti Machines or anything antique or artistie to 
-ell tile good Matured auctioneer. 

REading 2-1991 



I 



/ / / 

Made the way yoyy make \\ 
FOR YOUR DREAM KfTCHEttt 



/ 



Mr. 

Mr 

Mi. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr, 

Mr. 

Mr. 



HOL1DU P\RTY 



During the Christmas holidays, 
John Preston entertained a group 
of his classmates at his home on 
Madison avenue. The gathering 
enjoyed a buffet supper and several 
reels of interesting movies. 

John's guest included Judith 
Dalrymple, Jacqueline Hogan, 
Kathy Tonon, Carol Leverone. 
Mary Laird. Jean Hurd, Kenneth 
Brown, George Wilkinson, Bradley 
Loss and Chris Nicols, u former 
student at Mystic School and now • 
attending Fay School in Southboro, 
Mass. 




^AtxuUc Old 



GAS RANGE 



Mrs. Elizabeth R. Simonds of 11 
Futon street left this week for Mt. 
Kiseo. N. Y. to visit her son, Mr. 
J. B. Thomas. 

Latest Books 2^ 

Lending Library \ 

% WINSLOW I" 
1 PRESS 5 



It's more beautiful, more practical than ever. 
You'll enjoy its smokeless swing-out broiler . . . 
its one-piece self-lighting top burners ... its big, 
insulated oven with Red Wheel heat control . . . 
its platform lamp . . . clock timer . . . and all its 
marvelous new advantages that make for cooking 
convenience and lasting thrift. See this sparkling 
new Magic Chef now! 

ARLINGTON 

PART OF NEW 

2 Mt. Vernon St 





GAS LIGHT 



ENGLAND 

W inchester 



COMPANY 

ELECTRIC SYSTEM 

Tel. \VI 6-0142 



VjiAiiiiiillllllillllvt; 



NEW ENGLAND . . . the PLACE TO LIVE AND WORK 



Do you know what your public 
library has to offer you this year 
in addition to its regular service 
of books, magazines and reference 
information on almost anything 
you would like t<> know from ie- 
upholstering that old stuffed chair 
in your den to how to dive for 
pearls in the waters of the Solomon 
Islands? 

For you and your children 

Educational m o v i n g pictures 
every Friday evening (Family 
Night at the Library i a: 7:30 p. m. 
and again Saturday morning for 
the children at 10:15 a. m. The 
films to be shown next Friday, 
January 12 are: 
Elephants 

Animals growing up 



Trainin 



noon at :> p. m. and again at 7:30 
p. m. The program for next Wed- 
nesday, January 10 is: 

Scheherazade — First move- 
ment i — Rimsky-Korsakov. 

Sonata No. S in C Minor "Pathe- 
tique" (First movement — Beetho- 
ven. 

Musiial Comedy favorites: Songs 
from South Pacific — Brigadoon 
Oklahoma. 

Symphony No. 7 — Sibelius. 

Symphonic Espagnole ( Fourth 
and Fifth movements — Lalo. 
An Art Lover? 

Every month an exhibition 
(sponsored by the Winchester Art 
Association) is open to the public 
in the library's Art Gallery. The 
January exhibition is of oils by 
Marion [.add Synimes and of rlowei 
studies by Mae Bennett-Brown. 



tlu 



Hdrsi 



Cannibals Once 

Do you like music? 

Th.' new Downs Memorial Room 
open during library hours is equip- 
ped v. ith record albums and record 
players for playing of 7«, 33 1 3oi 
or 45 rpm records. By asking at 
the desk for instructions of how to 
use these record players you may 
relax in the comfortable and beau- 
tifully decorated Downs Room lis- 
tening to your favorite symphony, 
etc., with the earphones provided. 

Special recorded music programs 
have been planned and are now 
being played for your listening 
pleasure every Wednesday after- 



1 he Great Books Foundation 
group meets at the library every 
othei Wednesday evening at 7 
p. m. for discussion of the Great 
Books of all time. Anyone niav 
join this group at anytime. The 
next meeting is Wednesday, Jan- 
uary 17th and the discussion will lie 
based on Sophocles "Oedipus the 
King" and ••Antigone'". 

Library Hours 

Adult Department 10 a. m. to 'J 
p. m. Saturdays 10 a. m. to p. m. 
Roys' and Girls' Library 10 a. m 
j to 12 noori. i to (I p. m. 

Tel. Winchester 6-1 1 OR 



BUSINESS AND 
I » ROFESSION A L w o M E N 
TO MEET 

Paul K. Graves of Medt'ord. well 
known Nutritionist, will speak to 
members of the Business and Pro- 
fessional Women's Guild, First Con- 
gregational Church, on Wednesday 
evening. January 10, at 7:45 p. ni. 
in the Ladies' Parlor. All women 
aie cordially invited. Miss Helen 
Monroe will preside at the meet, 
ing, and the coffee hour will be 
under the direction of Mrs. Ruth 
Hilton and her committee. 

Mr. Graves' official top;,- is ■•Na- 
tional Malnutrition" a topic 
which hardly does justice to the 
very personal and vital information 
he brings to his audience. Because 
he knows how greatly food can 
change one's outlook on life, one's 
looks and personality, ho explains 
in his talk just how a pood diet can 
Iclp a woman "eat her way to 
beauty and new life." 11- material 
i i based on practical, common- 
sense knowledge, and Lis message 
will contain vita! help for many 
women, all aires. Hi.- lecture is 
amply illustrated with, slides, and 
he is most generous m answering 
questions of his listeners. 



Mr. and Mis. Mauroe C, Bird of 
the Winchester Arms were guests 
at the Inn at Steele Hill, I.aconia. 
IN. H., during the Christmas holi- 
days. 




EVERY PA* OF THE WEEK 

Every Week of the Year . . . 

First National prices are jus: as iow as possible on 
every item in the store. That is why when you com- 
pare your total food bill, you find you save every time 
vou shop at your First National Store. 




SU PC n ttnnt(CT 



TORES 



Quality Meat Values 



P»»*h Youna Poasfino Por* 



Pork Loins "5 9c • 



Rib End 



45c 



Jo (a 6 1 

Fr*sh 1*15* P'urrp > or Roettirg 5 - 6 Lb Ay*. 

Chickens tB 55c 

CKAWN CfADY fC R IHf OVfN LI 69c 

Laige. D urr.p "'ea'v 4 6 Lb Av*. 

Fresh Fowl f 43c 

DRAWN kiAOY IO COOK a 0 5 £ 

Cinh Younq Nat™ 2 ■ to 3'/;, lb Av*. 

Broilers or Fryers 3?c 

drawn rtAPY rc coo' 55 C 

l arc*. p un -, Vi Lflttff) Gicwn, --ne Qu, .1, 

Turkeys 

I RAWN Rf A r Y FCr THI CViN fc J 3 C 

S.ioulders 

t **an in *? '« " tit. ev u'P-J 

SSifed Baton 



FINAST 
PEACHES 

Halves oi S iced 
in Heavy Syiup 



29 oz 
CAN 



45 c 



CHUNKIET 
TUNA 

CWdafe - Light Meat 



Hamburg 

f»nrv c v>rie't. In on if c l»vO'ful 

Trankfurts 

Sea Qooti VcUurA 



MACKEREL 

SWORDFISH 

SMELTS 



f re,s 
F*nc, ' c»d 
f e«c> r o. I 



69c 
65c 

lb 23c 
lb 49c 
lb 29c 




STRAWBERRY 
RESERVES 

Mi-abel P ure Wno)e p,^ 
and Suqar 



LB 



39c 



Baked Beans 

21c 

Frown Bread 

F nast *i I 1 "T _ 

O d .-afb.oned Can | / C 

Fines: Ketchup 

fancy *% ills, OO^i 

Qua.ty «. Oi - OYC 



f >nast New 28 01 

England Style 



FANCY NEW ENGLAND YclNTOSH 

APPLES * 



i 



Oranges 

Grapefruit 3 23: Lettuce 



Celery 



29c Carrots 



nr.. 



Co 0'#<-, *h It. r mento 

Sliced Cheese 

Ocv#r'fll» t|i cw ■ p rll 

Ofeomcrgarine 



Pineapple 
Apricots Yor ^ afc *° 

} ^matt -arc- . #ig« 

Apricots 



Comii oc» 



f adv c or TH# °ii 



Sliced Apples 
Apple Sauce 
Fruit Co<ktail 

Pane* £»(ia I So* 

Finast Prunes 
Orange Juice 



LB 45c Tomato Juice 

M>n a> ^ R« - R'p« 

29c Tomatoes 2 

»or Gatd*n -im. I«ii(oini» 

CAN 29c Tomatoes 

Richmond »nr. V*. . ~ 

23c Sweet Peas 2 

Fina»t -anc» Cali'otn'a 

»K3 39c Tomato Paste 

I Richmond 3i»»n Tf P j 

19c Asparagus 

J F»ne» Soui*i*rn 

29c Blue Rose Rice 

£>f*t Nationa^ An Pufpo** 

CAN 37c Cheese Food 

CinaJt - c mc»o 

2 

p<e 

46 oi 

Can 



Can 25c 



I7oi 
CAN 

II oi 



203, 

Can 

20 



'9 oi 
CANS 



27c 



19 oz 0% m 
CAN ZOC 



;o ot 
Cans 



37c 



10c 



Can 



49c Dried Beef 



can OIC 



CEl lO 29c 



til 79c 

3 ]iS' 49c 



27c Paper Napkins 2 Tst 23c 



AJl Pnc*» in Thu Advertisemsnt £ffect!»* »' ~"it Nation*. i»it-S«rvie* Sup*( Market! r. Phii /icinit> — 

SuD-*ct »o Market Ch*B(J«l 




THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 5, 1951 



7 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSA( III SETTS 
Mi'i'ii.-wx. is. Probate Court. 

To all i»-r»oi)» inlerMtftl in the estate of 
LOl ISE H. BRIG HAM lat f tt . 
in said County of MHHesex. ami to the 
Attorney General, 

A petition ha» been presented to laid 
Court bj HARRIETT (.. WOLFE of said 
Winchester, representing that hhe had bwn 
the guardian of sui i deceased and that 
there i» owine to her from the tutate of 
■aid deceased, the sum of three hundred 
eighty-five and 48 100 dollars; that DAN- 
FORTH W. C0M1NS has been appointed 
public administrator of said estate, and 
praying that sai l DANFORTH W. C0M1NS 
h*- ordered to pay to the petitioner said sum 
at three hundred eighty-five and 4<i 100 
dollars. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in jaid Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in tiie forenoon on the 
tenth day of January 1051, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, John C. I.eggut, Esquire, First 
Judge of s fc jd Court, this fift.-enth day of 
December in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty. 

John J, Butler, Register. 

dec22-3t 



I OMMON WEALTH OF 
MASSAt HI SETTS 

Middlesex, >< Probate Court. 

To all persons who are or may become 
interested and to ati persons whose issue 
hot now in t»ing may Income interested in 
the trust estate under the will of H. 
ARTHl'R HALL late of Winchester in 
•Rid County, deceased, for the benefit of 
MAI D J. H Al l, and OTHERS. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court by the trustee- of said estate for au- 
thority to sell, at private sale, certain per- 
sonal estate held by them as such trustees. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the twenty- 
fourth day of January 1951, the return day 
<>f this citation. 

Witness. John C Leggat, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, tins fifteenth day of 
December it; the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty. 

John .1 Butler, Register. 

de2!)-3t 



< OMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

T RI( HARD H. BRINE of \\ in. 
in said County and ! h 1 \ ION SAVINGS 
BANK of Boston in the County of Suffolk 
and tie- Commonwealth aforesaid. JOSE- 
PHINE B BRINE and GEORGE W. 
BRINE of ' ban paign WILLIAM MAX- 

W ELL BRIN E ..f Ma) I in ti ■■ .-rate of 

Illinois, JANE BRINE SANSREGRET of 
Seattle i ■ . the State - f Washington, LEWIS 
HOWE BRINE c .. General Motors d- 
BrasH, Sao Paulo. Caisa Postal 2012. 
Ilrasil and to all other persons interested. 

A petition lias been presented to said 
Court by JOSEPHIN E M. BRINE of Win- 
Chester in said County of Middlesex repre- 
senting that she holds as tenant in common 
eleven undivided fifteenths parts or shares 
of certain land lying in Winchester in said 
County of Middlesex and briefly described 
as follows ; 

A certain parcel of land witfi the build- 
ings thereon, bounded as follows: North- 
westerly by Washington St. about 12:;. ft: 
Northeasterly by Webster S*. about 168. ft; 
Southeasterly by land now or formerly of 
CAROLINE A. PAYNE about 123. ft; and 
Southwesterly bj land now or formerly of 
AMELIA C. GREENLAW about 170. ft; 

i setting forth that she desires that all 

I of said land may be sold at private sale for 
not less than eleven thousand, seven hun- 

t dred dollars, and braying that partition 
may be made of all the land aforesaid 
according to law and to that end that a 
commissioner lie appointed to make such 
partition and be ordered to make sale and 
conveyance of all. or any part of said land 
which the Court finds cannot be advantage- 
ously divided either at private sale or public 
auction, and be ordered to distribute the 
net proceeds thereof. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should lib- a written appear- 
ance in said Court at Cambridge before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on the twenty-ninth 

1 day of January 1951, the return day of this 

I citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat, Esquire. First 
j Judge of said Court, this nineteenth day of 
(December in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty. 

John .1. Butler, Register. 

de204< 




SEE 2 FEATURES LATE AS s P. If, 
TODAY THRU S VTURDAY 
MAT 2 P M. EVE. CONT. FROM B : ::0 

David Brian - John Agar 

BREAKTHROUGH 



Ann Shi 



PLUS 
in - Victor Mature 



STELLA 



NOTE! EVERY SAT. MAT ' 
Hopalong Cnssidy Western 
Or Another Popular Star 
Firs' Chapter of New SERIAL! 



SI N. - M' >N - TUES. 
Jan 7. S, 9 

YOU'VE BEEN ASKING 
. . . AND HERE IT IS! 

FATHER OF THE BRIDE 

Spenrer Tracy - Elizabeth Taylor 
PLUS 

UNION STATION 

William Hidden - Nancy Olson 



COMING For 4 Days! 
WED, THRU SAT.. JAN. 10 - 13 

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

In TECHNICOLOR 
Betty Button - Howard Keel 



UNIVERSITY 
UN 4*4580 



NOW THRU SATURDAY 
•loan Crawford - Wendell Core* 

HARRIK'I CRAIG 

Larille Ball - Eddie Albert 

the n i.i.i i: urn sn <.im 



CHILDREN'S MOVIE 
Sat.. Jan. S at 10 A M 

Eddie Albert 

I UK Dl \)E C-UKS \\ KST 



A Terrytown Cartoon 
"Pirates nf the High Seas" 
Sun.. Mon.. T , Jan. 7. S. <i 
Tyrone Power - Mirhrlinr Prelle 

AMERICAN (il KRILLA 1\ 
Till PHILIPPINES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middtesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
Al)\ PI RM AN lat- ,,f Winchester in said 
County, deceased. 

The administrator of said estate has 
presented to said Court his second account 
for allowance and a petition for distribu- 
tion of the balance in his hands. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
sixteenth day of January 1951, the return 
day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat, Esquire, First 
.Tudire of said Court, this fourteenth day of 
December in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty. 

John J. Butler, Register. 

dec22-:tt 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
JENNIE L. SPRAGI E late of Winchester 
in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court for probate of a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will of said de- 
ceased by OLD (OI>ONY TRUST COM- 
PANY of Roston in the County of Suffolk 
praying that it be appointed executor 
thereof, without giving a surety on its 
j bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
| your attorney should file a written ap- 
j pen ranee in said Court at Cambridge before 
i ten o'clock in the forenoon on the tenth 
day of January 1951, the return day of 
i this citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat. F.squire, First 
Judge of said Court, thi- fifteenth day of 
December in the year one thousand nine 
; hundred anil fifty 

John .1 Butler, Register 

dec22-3t 



COM MON W E \ I TH OF 
MASSACHI SETTS 

I Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To a!! persons interested in the estate of 
CHARLES s \l> AVIS late of Winchester 
in said County, deceased. 

A petition lias been presented to said 
Court praying that ARTHUR S. ADAMS 
of Durham in the State of New Hampshire 
or some other suitable person, be appointed 
administrator of said estate 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
yo r attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the tenth day 
of January, 1961, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John C Leggat, Esquire. First 
Judge of said Court, this eighteenth day of 
December in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty. 

John J Butler. Register. 

dec22-:it 



Emlyn Williams - Eve Arden 

THREE 111 SB \M)S 



Wed. 



Review Day — Jan. in 



John Archer 

DESTIN \Tln\ MOOIS 

Ralph Richardson 

Till. FALLEN IDOL 



Thurs.. Fri.. Sat.. Jan 11. 12. It 
Janr Powell - Rirardn Montalban 

TWO WEEKS \\ ITU U)\ | 

Joseph Gotten - Linda Darnell 

TWO FLAGS WEST 

Continuous Daily from 1 :80 



(OMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested tn the tri st 
estate under the will of CLARA L. POND 
late of Winchester in said County, deceased, 
for the benefit of MARION W. POND. 

The trustees of said estate have presented 
to said Court for allowance their sixth to 
eighth accounts inclusive. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written appear- 
ance in said Court at Cambridge before ten 
o'c.ock in the forenoon on the twenty-sec- 
ond day of January IS5I, the return day of 
tins citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat, Esquire. First 
Judge of said Court, thi- twenty sixth day 
of December in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty. 

John J. Butler, Register. 

jan.1-3t 




NOW ENDS SATURDAY 

Dana Andrews 
Farley Granger 
in 

EDGE OF 
DOOM 

and 

KISS for CORLISS 

NEXT Sl'N , MON,, TUES. 

Anno Baxter 
Bette Davis 
Celeste Holm 
George Sander* 

ALL ABOUT 
EVE 

and 

CASSINO 
TO KOREA 



NOW ENDS SATURDAY 

Jeff Chandler 
Linda Darnell 



TWO FLAGS 
WEST 

a nd 

STATE 
PENITENTIARY 

N'EXT SUN., M"N.. TCES. 

Richard V. i dm ark 

Linda Darnell 
Stephen MaeNallj 

NO WAY OUT 

and 

John Carroll 
ill 

HIT PARADE OF 
1951 



I OMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, is. Probate Court 

To ail persons interested in the estate of 
ELIZABETH ARMISTEAD lat. of Win- 
. rhesfer in said County, deceased. 

The administrator of sai I estate has pre- 
' sented to said Court for allowance his first 
■ account 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
• your attorney should file a written ap- 
' pes ranee in said Court at Cambridge before 
' ten o'clock in the forenoon on the thirteenth 
| day of January 1851, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat, Esquire. First 
! Judge of -aid Court, this twenty-ninth day 
of December in the year one thousand nine 
I hundred and fifty. 

NOTICE OF LOST PASS BOOK 




+ 



WuTTtufNAPt? Jim Connelly 



In connection with the requirements of 
I Chapter DiT, Section 20, of the General 
Laws and Acts in amendment thereof or 
supplementary thereto, notice is hereby 
given of the loss of Pas- Book CI 74 DR. 4T,:'. 
I issued by the Winchester Cooperative Bank 
' ami that w ritten application has been made 
J to said hank for the payment of the amount 
of the deposit represented by said book 
or for the issuance of duplicate book there- 
for 

WINCHESTER COOPERATIVE BANK 
By Ernest R. Eustis. Treasurer 

janS-3t 



COMMONWEALTH OE 
MASSACHI SETTS 

, Middlesex, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons Interested in the estate of 
EMMANUEI.LE POI.ITANO also known 
as EMM AM El. I. A POI.ITANO. MARIA 
E. POI.ITANO and EMMANUELE POI.I- 
TANO of Winchester in said County, de- 

< erased, 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court, praying that ANGELINA POI.I- 
TANO of Winchester in said County, he 
appointed administratrix of snid estate, 
without giving it surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written appear- 
i nnce nt said Court at Cambridge before ten 
I o'clock in the forenoon on the fifteenth day 
I of January 1951, the return day of this 
i citation. 

Witness. John C Leggat, Esquire. First 
| Judge of sai I Court, this eighteenth day of 
December in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty. 

John J Butler. Register 
de2'J..1t 



WIN< HESTER LEGIONNAIRES 
AT BEDFORD PARTY 

A group of Winchester Legion- 
naires was among; those who at- 
tended the Christmas Dancing; 
Party at the Bedford Veterans' Ad- 
ministration Hospital last Thurs- 
day, December 28. 

(liven by the Middlesex County 
Council and Auxiliary, the party 
was for the patients at the hos- 
pital, hoth men and women, and 
was attended by representatives 
from posts throughout the country, 

It was held in the hospital audi- 
torium, uaily decorated by V. A. 
facilities, including a large Christ- 
mas tree strung with many colored 
lights. Refreshments were served 
by the Orchid Ladies assisted by 
members of the Legion Auxiliary. 

Department Vice Commander 
William Flanagan o f Cambridge 
and Department Assistant Ser- 
geant-at-Arms Thomas .Murray of 
Waltham officially represented the 
State Department of the Legion, 
and County Council members pres- 
ent were Senior Vice Commander 
Thomas R. Ferrick of Waltham, 
Junior Vice Commander Robert S. 
Murphy of Winchester, and Oscar 
La Bossiere of Somerville, county 
treasurer; James Grourkeof Tewks- 
ksbury, county assistant sergeant- 
at-Arms; Lionel Sadler, county ad- 
jutant, who was accompanied by- 
Junior Vice Commander John L. 
Martin and Adjutant Hugh L. 
Brinkley of Newton Post. Mis. 
Herbert Rand of Waltham, County 
director, and Miss M a y Nutter, 
third vice president, represented 
the Auxiliary. 

Winchester representatives at 
the party included Post Commander 
Lester C. (iustin, Jr., Junior Vice 
Commander Robert Burr, Charles 
W. Meek, Joseph T. McKee and 
Mrs. Charles W. Meek, Jr., presi- 
dent of the Auxiliary to Post 97, 
A. L. 



GIRL SCOUT NEWS 

The vacation skating party was 
! a success from every angle. The 
good sportsmanship of the girls 
won the everlasting praise of the 
adults who assisted. The commit- 
tee voted unanimously to help with 
another such party at any time, 
while the two hundred and twenty 
girls voted to have another such 
outing as soon as it could be ar- 
ranged. These girls enjoyed two 
j hours of skating and closed by 
forming a Horseshoe and singing 
"Golden Sun.'" 

The Annual meeting of the As- 
sociation of Girl Scouts will be 
held at the Library January 10th 
lat 7:45. All registered adults in- 
' eluding leaders. Committee mem- 
bers and assistants, are planning 
to attend. The business session in- 
cludes the election of officers. Mr. 
i J. W. Blackham of the Winchester 
| Civilian Defense Commission will 
speak on "Civilian Defense" from 
jthe local angle. Everyone is urged 
| to hear this as the Girl Scout De- 
fense Program is now being formed. 

Mrs. Barbara Metcalf and Mrs. 
Robert Lowry represented the local 
group at the National Convention 
of Public Relations on Thursday, 
January 4th. The meeting was held 
in Boston at 87 Beacon street. 

Mr. Pollard, Director of the Ski 
School wishes each Student to know 
that he will be glad to hold classes 
any week-day, if a group of ten 
register. This plan assures the 
Students of all the lessons despite 
the weather. You may sign up by 
calling at the Scout office when you 
buy your book. Don't neglect to 
signify which days are best for 
you — it's a short lesson. 



PHII.ATHEA GUEST NIGHT 



AMERICAN LEGION 
AUXILIARY 



The regular monthly meeting of 
the Auxiliary will be held on next 
Monday, January 8, at 8 o'clock at 
the Legion Home. Make an effort 
to be present and start the New 
Year with a resolution to do' more 
than ever for our Veterans' Re- 
habilitation. There is more work 
to be done in the coming months 
than ever before and the continued 
support and effort of every member 
lis needed to make it successful. 

Our first party of the year will 
be a "Box Social" and Entertain- 
ment on Saturday evening, Jan- 
uary L'7 and it promises to be most 
unusual and interesting. 

County Council is to be in Tewks- 
bury tli s month on Saturday after- 
noon. January 27 and President 
Rita Meek urges all members to 
plan mi attending and have Win- 
chester Unit well represented. 

BAPTIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP 



This Sunday evening, January 
7th. at (5:30 o'clock, the Baptist 
Youth Fellowship will enjoy "An 
Evening on the Cold Coast". Mr. 
Khou Akhar. a student at Tufts 
College, will speak to the young 
people on his native homeland, the 
Gold Coast of Africa. Mr. Akhar 
is in our country for four years 
preparing to return to his native 
country to teach. Weather per- 
mitting, he will wear his native 
dress. 

We hope a large number will be 
present to hear and talk with our 
guest. 



The PhUathea group of the First 
Baptist Church will hold its annual 
Guest Night in the Social Hall of 
the Church Tuesday evening, Jan- 
uary 9th. Mrs. Eleanor Foreman 
will give an inspirational talk on a 
subject dear to the hearts of all 
women — "Bonnets". She uses 
fascinating bonnets of yesterday 
and today to illustrate some of the 
worthwhile qualities in life. For 
example, old fashioned bonnets for 
a sense of humor, an aviatrix hel- 
met for courage, picture hats for 
beauty, sunhonnets for enjoyment 
of home life, a nurse's cap for ser- 
vice, and a bride's bonnet for love. 
Three lovely models will show 
these bonnets. This is a program 
which will delight every female, 
for it has often been said that when 
a woman is feeling dejected the 
surest cure is to go out and buy a 
new hat. 

Another treat on this evening's 
program will be music by the High 
School (Jills' Octette under the 
direction of Miss Eleanor Anifan- 
tis. 

The hostesses for this guest 
evening are: Mrs. Elmer Ripley, 
Mrs. Elizabeth MacLeod, Mrs 
Harold Ekstrom, Mrs. Cecil Pride, 
Mrs. Ernest Dade and Mrs. Leslie 
Stewart. 

All women of tin chinch are cor- 
dially invited. 

CHRISTMAS PARTY FOR 
NOONAN SCHOOL PUPILS 

On Friday morning, December 
22nd. the pupils nf the Noonan 
School were given a Christmas 
party by the Mothers' Association. 

The children assembled in the 
auditorium and were thrilled with 
the power of "The Great Mr. 
Magic." Screams of laugher filled 
the hall when he magically made 
the rabbit appeal- out of an "empty" 
box. They sat spellbound when he 
turned on his power to make milk 
flow from the elbow of one of the 
pupils. On leaving the hall the 
children were given a bag of Christ- 
mas candy and went back to their 
rooms where each class put on their 
own program which included the 
singing of carols. 

The committee of Mothers served 
cookies and the happy children 
were then on their way to enjoy 
their Christmas holidays. 



WIN< HESTER RED CROSS 

The Boston Blood Center was 
staffed by workers from the Win- 
chester Red Cross on Wednesday of 
this week. Mrs. Kingman Cass, 
Mis. William O. Thompson, Mrs. 
William T. Thompson, and Mrs. 
Alfred Parker were the Canteen 
workers. Nurses' Aides were: Mrs. 
Richard Harlow, Mrs. Robert Arm- 
strong, Mrs. Hairy Nutter. Mrs. 
James Beal, Mrs. Hollis Dyer, and 
Mrs. George Field. Mrs. Edward 
Foeley and Mrs. Oscar Surtees were 
the Gray Ladies. The Motor Corps 
driver was Mrs. Richard Fenno and 
the Staff Aides were Mrs. Dunbar 
Shanklin and Mrs. Kenneth Mof- 
fatt. 

The Motor Corps will take two 
patients to the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital on Monday. Last 
week it made a trip to Boston for 
the Winchester Hospital. 

Those who wish to enroll in the 
Home Care of the Sick class or 
the Nurses' Aide class should call 
the Red Cross, Winchester 6-2300, 
or Mrs. George Hutting, Winches- 
ter 6-2191. A special appeal is be- 
ing made for inactive Nurses' 
Aides. A tea will be given soon to 
acquaint them with the local pro- 
gram. 

Mrs. Harry Goodwin, one of Win- 
chester Chapter's most active work- 
ters, sustained a broken leg last 
week when she fell on an icy side- 
walk in Winchester Square. Her 
colleagues in the Chapter wish her 
a speedy recovery. In Mrs. Good 
win's absence Mrs. Edward Bait- 
lett is assisting in the Red Cross 
office. 

Through the courtesy of Mr. 
Thomas Duddy of the Winchester 
Red Cross, 28 patients at Bedford 
Veterans' Hospital were taken on 
a tour of the Charlestown diesel 
shops on Wednesday. Four Junior 
Red Cross workers filled over 2200 
nut cups for Christmas at Bedford 
Veterans' Hospital. 

An appeal for O-type blood was 
made over the radio this week. The 
Winchester Chapter referred a 
donor to the Boston Blood Center. 
It also obtained two walking donors 
with the rare O-negative blood for 
Winchester Hospital last Saturday. 

Mis. Nathaniel M. Nichols has 
been appointed Honorary Chairman 
of the 1!>51 Red Cross Campaign in 
Winchester. The appointment of 
Mrs. Nichols, a long-time worker in 
the Winchester Chapter, was an- 
nounced today by Mr. Lewis K. 
Moore. Chairman of the local Chap- 
ter. There will be a meeting of 
Campaign workers in the Town 
Hall on Monday. 

The following letter was received 
by the Red Cross office this week 
in appreciation of the refreshments 
which the Winchester Chapter pur- 
chased f ro m Splendid Lunch, 
Christie Mar-Donald's, and Renton's 
Creamery and distributed free to 
the firemen fighting the Lvceum 
Hall fire: 

I would like to convey to you 
the sincere thanks and appreciation 
of the Winchester Fire Department 
for the hot coffee and doughnuts 
served during the fire in the 
Lyceum Building on the morning 
of December 14th. 

Sincerely yours, 

James E. Callahan 

Chief, Winchester Fire Dept. 



f CCOO COSH 
i so veu mOt hi r - 

, AN AOTOcAOBIl 

hcw lonu most 
vou weak' those 

PAMOATES' 



,OSH 

hi r BV \ 



MV DOCTOR SAYS 
TEN DAYS 
PoT MV i-AV-YEG! 
SAYS TEN WEEK. 5 



•iOC CAN OE-sT JSSOCEO 

WINCHESTER 
CAMERA SHOP 

DO A-u iN THEIC POWER 
TO SATISFY AHO WIN 
YCXR FRIENDSHIP. 




Kodak Pony 828 



CAMERA 



The "Pony" is simple to 
use, and anyone can make 
good color pictures with it. 
Has f/4.5 lens, flash 200 
shutter. Only $29.95 here, 
including Federal Tax. 



• Good snapshots, in black- 
and-white or full color, are 
easier than ever to get. You 
get 12 shots per roll. Nega- 
tives, 2 Vi x 2 'A . Only $13.95 
here, including Federal Tax. 



Winchester (omerh Shop 

570 MAIN <T. • WI-6 0952 • WINCHESTER 



Elizabeth P.. Cusack, of 2 Lake- 
view road, has been appointed as 
a Notary Public, it was announced 
today by Edward J. Cronin, Sec- 
retary of the Commonwealth. The 
appointment was made by Gov- 
ernor Paul A. Dover and was con- 
firmed by his Executive Council 
this week. Secretary Cronin signed 
the commission. 



WASHINGTON SCHOOL 
V VGEANT 

The George Washington School 
presented a Christmas pageant in 
which the entire school partici- 
pated, with the exception of the 
Kindergarten children. The theme 
centered on "While Shepherds 
Watched Their Flocks." 
Scene 1 - 

Shepherds on the Hillsides 
Scene 2 - 

The Manger 
Scene :? - 

Three Great Kings 
Characters: 
Prologue - 

Gail Hendricks 
Narrators - 

Kenneth MacArthur 

Douglas Thomson 

Lincoln Morison 

Sally MacArthur 

Lissa Marshall 

Anne Neville 

Christopher King 

Ernest Cantella 

Gloria Bennett 
Mary - 

Linda Sonter 

Dianne Lorentzen 
Joseph - 

James Bogue 

James Wakefield 
Shepherds - 

Arthur Graham 

Kenneth Erb 

Richard Huff 

< harles Carlson 

Warren Hagstrom 

Frank Johnson 

Arthur Zaino 
Children - 
Andy Sojohlni 



Penny Borden 

Bonnie Low 

Guild Nichols 

Erie Wittet 
Angels - 

Gerry Carver 

Kathy Dougherty 

Sandra Burr 

Marie Gentile 

Jan Huff 

Marcia Eaton 

Suzanne Meek 

Dianne Watson 

Judith Towle 

Linda Carter 
Kings - 

Joe Donovan 

Billy Morton 

John Fitzgerald 
Epilogue - 

Peter Quine 
Stage Manager - 

Donald Wyman 
Ushers - 

John Kelleher 

Joe Cussen 
Scenery - 

Painted by Grades :!-l Combina- 
tion and Grade 5. 

During several tableaux, the vari- 
ous classes samr appropriate carols. 
Lighting effects added to the 
pageantry. The message carried to 
the audience emphasized that our 
gifts, especially during the Christ- 
mas season should be love for one 
another with personal sacrifices 
that make people happier and 
richer through livinir and sharing 
together, 



Sojourning at the Riviera Hotel 
in Florida an- Mi. and Mrs. Sam 
Ginsburg, <'> Euclid avenue. 



Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 
Here We Go Again! 

WINT0N CLUB 
CABARET 

JANUARY 25 - 26 - 27 

FOR TICKETS 

Friday. Saturday. Floor Ti« k. t- S3.6U 
Reservations may be made by mail or in person. Ml *<T 
lil ur.OMIWNIF.I) BY CHECK OR CASH. No TKLK- 
PHONK RF.Sh R\ VTI< >\S. 



Mr-. Frank C. rFEWaux 
12 Sheffield Road 



Friday, Saturday. Baleony Tickets l-t row onh n 
served $1.50. Cnreserved 90c. 

Thursday Theatre Nijit VII Ticket* S1.30 

Mr-. Herbert T. \\ auWorth 
].i Norwood Street 
W Inchester 6-0005 




In the New England Tradition 



As renowned as Htb-born baked beans 
is Bos'o" Cream P:e — par ,; ;'*!arly the 
way DorotHy Muriel s prepares it. Be- 
tween golden yellow layers of light 
and fluffy butter cake lies a srrooth 
cream filling, enricned wi»h egg yoiks, 
fresh milk and pure vanilla. T^en — 
the crowning touch — a milk chocolate 
icing made from fresh b^'er and milk, 



BUY IT BAKED" AT 




FOOD / SHOPS 

SILENT PARTNER OF THE HOSTESS 
To avo'd tfijoppeintmtnj, jmt l«iephon» .i a ; *• will r«j«rv« fout cder. 



fondant, melted chocolate and pure 
vanilla flavoring. Indeed an elegant 
dessert — fit for family pleasure as 
well as the most formal banquet. 
Serve Boston Cream Pie this evening 
— fresh and wonderful — and so sat- 
isfying to hearty winter appetites — 
at your local Dorothy Muriel s shop 
today. 



jrotn 

S42 Main Stie«l 
Wl 6-2038 
A-v-tr Oorotfy Muritl 
Fi5d Shop car -e- tnliir * 
H*M Jl A. 



8 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 5, 1951 




HOME BUYERS 

CHOOSE THE WINCHESTER 

CO-OPERATIVE BANK 

for your 

HOME MORTGAGE 



1 1 




FOR SALE 



Went Side Ranch house. Three bedrooms. Large 
living room with fireplace. Double garage. §123,5(10. 

Attractive modern four bedroom house in Mystic 
School section. First floor lavatory. Pine panelled gameroom. 
Over 17,000 feet of land. §23,000. 



Two bedroom home in pood location. 
! 1 1,900. 



Oil heat. Garag* 



Terms to mci 



exact need.--. Moderate monthly 
mical, sound financing. 



I 



RUTH C. PORTER Realtor 

33 THOMPSON STREET 

Winchester 6^1 310 Evenings Winchester 6-2316 — 6-316S 



The Ideal Plan 



Co-operative Banks ovigina 
mortgage plan which makes 
ership in a reasonable period 
monthly payment does three 



ed the type of home 
possible complete own- 
»f time. Each moderate 
things — pays off part 
fth of 



of the loan; pays the interest; pays one-twt 
yearly real estate tax. With this 
steady reduction of your loan, com- 
plete ownership is achieved. 



COME IN AND 
TALK IT OVER 
NO OBLIGATION 




: i 



: i 



19 CHURCH STREET. WINCHESTER 
Tel. Winchester 6-1078 



WINCHESTER HOMES 

Charming Colonial Home, delightfully located on beautiful 
tree shaded street. Six rooms, tiled bath and first floor lavatory. 
Basement laundry. Oil Heat. Complete insulation. Garage. 
Built for Owner, this home will, on inspection, prove to be unusual 
value both in construction and location. $20,000. 

VERNON W. JONES 

REM. ESTATE 
Twenty-sixth Year in Winchester 
National Bank Building Winchester 6-0S9S or 6-1163 




WINCHESTER 6-0035 

vine: and elm.vooo avc. 
winchfster 




INSURE 
AGAINST FIRE 



Luther W. Puffer, 
Jr., Inc. 

557 Main Street 

Winchester 
Winchester 6-1980 



We Have Recovered From The Fire And 
Are Back In Business In The Same Place 

We want 100 Houses to sell. Many customers 
waiting to Buy. 

^ our MOl SE may ju-t meet their requirements, 
To List Your Property ('.nil 

P. T. FOLEY & CO. 

Realtors and Insurance 

2 Mft. Vernon Street Winchester 6-1192 



i 

j Ban 

I Garage, $10, 



FOR SALE 



se oi seven looms in excellent 
000. 



i 



even room Colonial in Mystic Schi 
500 



i seven 

j ( I a r a pe . * 1 v . " 

Qftic 



cation. -Oil heat, 
'ctton. Oil heat. 



I FESSENDEN 

f KATHR\ N l\ St I l IVAN. Realtor 

) 3 Common Street 

j Winchester 6-0<h> I— 6-2770— 6-21 37-R— 6-313 1—6-131; 



F. C. Rivinius & Co. 



INSURANCE 



148 State St. 
Boston, Mass. 
LA 3-5730 



1". Church St. 
Winchester 
WI fi-.12fiv 



PARKHURST SCHOOL DISTRICT 

.N'ow Garrison Colonial home with many extra features, 
t ahmet kitchen, lavatory, dining room, cheerful living room and 
patio, rhree large bedrooms and tile bath and shower. Playroom 
with fireplace, laundry. Forced H. W. oil heat, \ttached enraee 
and large lot of land. #20,000. 

MURRAY & GILLETT, Realtors 

1 Thompson Street 
Winchester 6-2560 Eves. Winchester 6-2621 6-2313 6-1992 



Anne Rivinius Wild. Broker 

mal3-tf 1 I 



JOHN B. MERCURI0 

1 Mt. Vernon Street 
Insurance and Real Estate 
Tel. Winchester 6-3400 



SNOW DELIGHTS MOUNT PERO 
CAMPERS 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



Have you been searching for a 
Polaroid "Picture in a Minute" 
Camera? Just one left — at the 
Winchester Shop. Winchester (5- 
0952. 

Mr, and Mrs, William Bottger of 
Sheffield road have been recent 
guests at the Hotel George Wash- 
ington in New York City en route 
to spend the Christmas holidays 
with their son in Roanoke. Vir- 
ginia. Mrs. Bottger is still in 
Roanoke but Mr. Bottger returned 
to Winchester on New Year's Day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark W. Collins 
left this week for Sarasota. Florida, 
where they will remain until April. 

For Fuel Oil. Phone Fitzgerald 
Fuel Co., Winchester 6-3000. 

o5-tf 

Mr. Paul R. Butterworth and 
family have moved recently to 
Woodstock, Illinois, where Mr. 
Butterworth will be employed by 
the Castolite Co. Mr. Butterworth 
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Finest 
H. Butterworth of .'58 F.nglowond 
road. 

The many friends of Elliott F. 
Cameron will be glad to know, that 
while still at the Winchester Hos- 
pital, his condition is improving 
rapidly and hopes to be home in the 
very near future. 

For experienced service or re- 
pairs on all makes of sewing 
machines or vacuum cleaners, call 
E. W. Clark, Winchester 6- 
0140-W. augl4-tf 

Mrs. Otis W. I.eary of Farrow 
street was expected to enter the 
Winchester Hospital this week to 
undergo a major operation. 

Last Saturday morning at 8:4a 
a Brockway trailer-truck, owned by 
the Metropolitan Ice Company of 
Somerville and being driven north 
on Main street by Warren E. 
Swicker of 138 Sunset road, Arl- 
ington, skidded 0 n the slippery 
roadway and collided with a Mer- 
cury sedan, parked in front of the 
residence of Mr. Edward A. Shea, 
Ml Main street, and owned by Dr. 
Arthur Morrisey of 185 High street, 
Medford. Swicker reported the ac- 
cident at Police Headquarters and 
Dr. Morrisey was notified of the 
damage done his machine. 



Attention Piano Students and 
Instrumentalists. Chords for 
popular music easily explained. 
Modern and constructive course in 
keyboard harmony. Expert train- 
ing. Popular and classical music. 
Albert Horn, teacher. Studio 
Waterfield Building, 28 Church 
street. Tel. Winchester (i-1987. 

d29-2t 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald W. Leary 
of Somerville are the parents of a 
daughter, born New Year's Day at 
the Winchester Hospital. Paternal 
grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 
Otis W. Leary of Farrow street. 

A selection of the latest style 
hats for all occasions at Miss 
Ekman's, 15 Church street. Also 
twoed hats made. s8-tf 

E. Abbot Rradlee, town treas- 
urer, has taken out nomination 
papers for re-elect ion at the com- 
ing March town election. He is the 
first candidate to take out papers 
this year. 

Tax Commissioner Henry F. 
Long has assigned a deputy to take 
tax returns at the General Com- 
mittee Room at the town hall on 
February 6, from 9:30 a. m. to 1 




FOR SALE IN WINCHESTER 

NEW EXCLUSIVE LISTING 

Three-year old garrison colonial, first floor has 
large living room with fireplace, good size dining 
room, modem cabinet kitchen, lavatory. Second 
floor, 2 master chambers and one smaller room, tiled bath with 
shower, abundant closet space. Attached garage, large level lot. 
Because of change in business owner offers this home for quick 
sale at $15,900. 

G. A. J0SEPHS0N - Real Estate - Mortgages 

5 Church Street (Star Building) 
Tel. Winchester 6-2426 Evenings. Winchester 6-1847-M 



MASTER SERGEANT 



RETIRED 

arroll 



p. m.. and from 2 p. 



m. to 4 p. m. 
dec22-tf 



NEW LOW ROUND TRIP PLANE 
FAKES TO EIROPE 



For pleasure travel, business, or 
to visit relatives, 15 day excursion 
fares, round trip, from Roston to: 
Athens $649.20 
London 402.00 
Paris 430.00 
Rome 522.10 
Shannon 370.70 
Amsterdam 430.00 
Frankfurt 402.00 
Glasgow 380.90 
Copenhagen 462.00 
Stockholm 489.90 
Lowest fares ever quoted. Travel 
from Boston via TWA. Pan Ameri- 
can. Air France. British Overseas 
Airways, all National Scheduled 
Airlines. 

For information and reservations 



, call your Authorized Travel Agent, 
The Fire Department was called j, p McGrath, Jr.. Travel Service. 

to the home oi u Eaton avenuei Woburn. Tele- 
phone: WOburn 2-1234. - Winches- 
ter 0-3130. jan5-2t 



Monday afternoon 
Mr. Robert Walsh on Holland 
street to put out a tire caused by 
a flooded oil burner in the kitchen 
range 

Call Ed Lynch for prompt re- 
moval of rubbish. Winchester 6- 
3510. slO-tf 

Mr. and Mrs. Augustus ,1. Boy- 
den are vacationing at Sebring, 
Florida. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis G. Chase 
of Salisbury street are spending a 
month at Del Rae Beach, Florida. 



ENGAGEMENT 



Mr. and Mrs. Alfred B. Capone 
of 51 Spruce street wish to an- 
nounce the engagement of then- 
daughter. Edith Marie, to Charles 
Joseph Lentini, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Inazio Lentini of 25 Fowle 
street. Woburn. 



Master Sergeant John J. ( 
(son of Mrs. Catherine Carroll of 
lit! Sylvester avenue,) Regular 
Army Sergeant Instructor on duty 
at the Instructor's Office, Organized 
Reserves, Reserve Armory, Ft. 
Worth, Texas, has been placed on 
the Retired List by the Department 
of the Army after completion of 
more than thirty years active Mili- 
tary Service, effective Deeembei 31, 
1950, He has been advanced on the 
Army of the United States retired 
list to the grade of Warrant Officer, 
the grade held by him during World 
War 2. 

Hilling World War 2. Sergeant 
Carroll served in the European. 
African and Middle Eastern Thea- 
tre of Operations with the 376th 
Bombardment Group 1 Heavy 1 one 
of the Bombardment Groups mak- 
ing the famous low-level attack on 
the Ploesti Oil Fields in Roumania. 
During his Army service he also 
served in the Philippines and 
< hina. 

Sgt. Carroll resides with bis wife 

and son at 1119 Small street, 
Grand Prairie, Texas, a suburb of 
Dallas, Texas. Upon his retire- 
ment he intends to accept a position 
with a civilian firm in the city of 
Dallas. 



WINCHESTER, 63; 
LEXINGTON, II 

Great Victory Puts Locals 
League Title Fight 



in 



WINCHESTER PLAYS TWO 
AWAY 





ORIENT 


*L PUG CO 

t=#=t 


l—^ [ 

'■ 


Hi 


R 






1 n 1 



INSTITUTED 

to serve you on all 
your rugs needs 
Call 

Winchester S 0654 
34 Church Street 



Winchester High plays two Mid- 
desex League contests during the 
coming week, with both contests 
being on foreign courts. Tonight 
the locals travel to Melrose to meet 
the perennially tough Red Raiders 
of Melrose High. Melrose has the 
tallest team in the League again 
this year and the Red and Black 
will be hard pressed to beat the 
tight game zone defense that Mel- 
rose uses on its home court. Next 
T u e s d a y afternoon Winchester 
plays Concord High at the Boston 
Arena and should take this one un- 
less they come down with an acute 
attack of stage fright on the spaci- 
ous Arena court. 

The most attractive game of the 
home schedule is on tap for next 
Friday night when Belmont High 
pays its annual visit to Winchester. 
Belmont is still smarting from an 
overtime defeat handed them on 
their home floor last year by the 
locals which gives them an added 
incentive to go all out this year in 
retaliation. 



TWO CARS SKIDDED ON 
BACON STREET 



1 



EXPANDED 

To give you even 

Better Service 

Our new. large and efficient 
Rug Cleaning plant for 
Cleaning. Repairing and 
Storing of your rugs. 




- MOURADI AN - 



m»13-tf 



Two cars were damaged in skids 
on Bacon street during the slippery- 
going last Friday night, but no in- 
juries were reported. 

Shortly after 11:15 a Buick 
coupe was reported stopped across 
Bacon street in front of the old 
Mystic School. Police found that 

; it was being driven downhill by 
Roy Twombly of Hampden avenue, 
Burlington, when it went into a 
skid, crossing the street and strik- 
ing a tree. The machine was so 

i badly damaged about the front end 

! it had to be towed to Burlington. 

About the same time the above 
accident was taking place a Ford 
sedan being driven west on Bacon 
street by Donald T. Ferguson of 8 

, Fourth road, North Woburn, skid- 
ded and struck a tree on the north 
side of the street in front of the 
Plunkett home. In this case the 
car was only slightly damaged 
and was able to proceed under its 

; own power. 



Winchester High won a great 
63 - 11 victory over Lexington High 
at the high school gym on Wed- 
nesday afternoon. Lexington has 
been hailed as "the team to beat'' 
in the Middlesex League this year 
and the locals moved right into 
the contention for the league title 
by this victory. The margin of 
the Red and Black victory was sur- 
prising as they oUtseored the Min- 
utemen in every period to definite- 
ly establish their superiority. 

The Red and Black moved into a 
12 - 5 lead at the end of the first 
quarter as they limited Lexing- 
ton to one basket from the floor 
during that period. The scoring 
tempo quickened in the second pen 
od as the locals forged to a 32 - 19 
lead at half time. Doug Hawkins 
had the "hot hand" during this first 
half as he paced his team in scor- 
ing at the intermission. The third 
period was another high scoring 
canto as the locals established a 
50 - 33 lead at the end of that peri- 
od with Charlie Murphy leading 
the scoring drive. Winchester held 
Lexington to 8 points in the last 
period to throttle any hopes the 
visitors had of staging a big rally 
in the final quarter. 

It would perhaps be unfair to 
single out any Winchester player 
to praise for they performed as a 
team with each man carrying out 
his assignment. Credit must be 
given to Charlie Murphy, however, 
for his grand job of covering Dick- 
McDonald, the Lexington ace. as 
well as being the key man in set- 
ting up the Winchester offense and 
coming through with several timely 
baskets. Rodney Long and John 
Dilorio were very effective in 
sweeping the defense backboard 
while Doug Hawkins and Stowell 
Symmes rebounded very well of- 
fensively. The Winchester scoring 
was well distributed with eight 
men in the scoring column as the 
locals continued to shoot well, con- 
necting on 37 per cent of their 
shots. 

The Winchester Seconds con- 
tinued undefeated with five straight 
victories as they trounced the Lex- 
ington Seconds 61 - 37. The score 
was tied at the end of the first 
quarter but the Red and Black 
gradually pulled away to win easi- 
ly. Peter Coon with 14 points and 
John Atkinson with 12 points were 
high scorers for the locals with Stu 
Thomson playing an outstanding 
floor game. . 

The summary: 

Winchester High 

Dilorio. If 
Forester, If 
Symmes. rf 
Ix.ntf, c 
Hawkins, c 
Murphy, ig 
Donlun. Ik 
Farrell. rg 
Cirurso, rg 



morning services were 
1 in Camp for Protestant 
and Catholic Campers 
■n in town for services. A 
oast in the snow, with 
marshmallows and hot 
proved a new experience 
if the campers. After a 



Twenty five happy boys and girls 
of Winchester and Woburn enjoyed 
three days of the New Year's week 
end by skiing to their heart's con- 
tent in twelve inches of fluffy, 
white, powder snow at Camp Mount 
Peru, Plymouth, New Hampshire 
in the White Mountains. 

The campers arrived Friday noon 
by train, were met at the station 
and after a hearty lunch it wasn't 
long before all skis were on and 
everyone was busy breaking out 
the slope. The skiers were classi- 
fied into groups of the same ability 
and were given excellent instruc- 
tion by the Camp's very capable 
staff. The close of the first day 
was climaxed with a feature movie 
"Winter Carnival." 

The next day dawned bright and 
clear and everyone was anxious to 
get out for an early run down the 
-lope. The 900 ft. rope tow was 
j put into operation and prepara- 
tions were made for the big races 
j to be run on Sunday. Boxing and 
j wrestling matches were on the 
evening program and the day was 
I brought to a close with a delight- 
Iful story told by Mrs. Fran Ver- 
I planck. 

Sunday 
I conductec 
i campers 
! were taki 
1 wiener 1 
toasted 
chocolat 
, for many 

half hour noun rest the race events 
I of the afternoon were started, with 
1 the following results: 

Team Two: captained by Jackie 
( 'oak ley won the combined events 
with 21Mi points. Other team mem- 
bers included Art Wood. Jim Wake- 
field, Richard Burnes, and Gerry 
Carver. Team Three: came in sec- 
ond place with IK points. This 
team was made up of Doug Gowdy 
as captain, Jim Kennedy, Bill Mor- 
ton. Art Graham, and Sally Mac- 
Arthur. Team Four; was third 
with 15% points. This team was 
made up of Dickie Low, Captain, 
Paul Lamarche, Joe Donovan, Ken 
Mae Arthur and Bill Jacquith. Team 
One: came in fourth place with 8 
points. This team had Jackie Ghir- 
ardini as captain, Butch Davies, 
Lin Morison, Ed Morse, and Mike 
Houghton. Ann Tofuri, Janet 
Chaffe; Nancy Towle also entered 
several events. 

Individual honors hased on two 
days of competition went to Doug 
Gowdy, 1st place. Jackie Coakley, 
2nd place and Dickie Low, Art 
Wood tied for 3rd place. The events 
included slalom, downhill, and 
cross-country skiing. Skating and 
tobogganing were also enjoyed by 
the young campers. 

Another feature movie "Silver 
Skates" brought the day to a close. 
All were reluctant to go to bed 
knowing that the week end was 
nearly over and the next morning 
all would be taking the train back 
home - leaving behind them the 
beautiful mountains of snow. 

Camp Mount Pero is directed by- 
Mr. and Mrs. Roland A. Nault and 
was very capably staffed by Mr. 
and Mrs. W. K. Verplanck. Bob 
Lamson, and Ted Trott all of Win- 
chester; Mrs. Colburn as cook and 
Pat and Nancy as waitresses from 
Plymouth. 

We are looking forward to an- 
other successful week end again in 
February. 



WEST SIDE EXCLUSIVE 

property completely redecorated, Wvm.in 

School district. 

SOPHIE BOWMAN 

45 Church Street 

Winchester 6-2.->75 — 6-0795 (davs) 
Winchester 6-3278 — 6-1966 evenings and Sundays 



VARIETY SHOW 



The Winchester Rainbow Girls, 
Assembly No. 50, will present a 
Variety Show on January 5 at the 
Masonic Hall, commencing at 8 
o'clock sharp. 

This is a Grand Assembly Pro- 
ject under the direction of Pearl 
Ray, Grand Organist. Candy- 
will be served by ushers during in- 
termission and refreshments served 
after the completion of the pro- 
gram. 

The program is as follows: 
Temptation a piano selection 
Monologue ■ Dorothy Wescott 

"Bachelor's Reverie" 
Country girl Sally Parkin 

College girl Barbara Mulea 

Military girl Hilda Quilitzsch 

Belle of the Ball Barbara Johnston 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASS A I HI SETTS 

WM«* X , m. IVobat, Court. 

lo all persona interested in the estate ct 
FLORENCE" W. Bl'TLER late of Win- 
Chester in sai l County, deceased, 

A petition hm been presented to said 
< ourt -f,.r probate of a certain instrument 
purporting t" !»■ the ht*i «il| ,>f bu j,| ,j P . 
ceased by CHARLES W. Hl'TI.KR and 
HAZEN H. AVER of Winched in said 
( ounty, praying that they he appointed ex- 
poiitora thereof, without giving a surety n 
their bonds. 

If y<"l desire tO object thereto vou CT 

your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
twenty-third day ,.f Januarj 1951, the re- 
turn day of this citation. 

Witness, John C LcBgat. Esquire. Kir»t 
Judge of said Court, this third ilav ct 
January in the year one thoisand ni^e 
hundred and fifty-one, 

John J Butler. Register, 

jan5-3t 



Janet Archibald 
Blanche Hanlon 
Jean Rice 
Laura Ames 
Ann Hammond 
Muriel Pride 
Shirley Kinney 



Pearl Ray 



Tennis girl 
Western girl 
City girl 
Skating girl 
N'urse 
Widow 
Pianist 
Choral Group 

Marilyn Ward 

Judith Brain ha 11 

Janet Archibald 
Reader 

Intermission 
Jealousy — - piano selection 
Solo - Marilyn Ward 
Drum Majorettes 
Dorothy Wescott, Hilda Quilitzsch 
"Advice A -Plenty" 
Muriel Pride 
Jane Robinson 
Susan Graham 
Jean Rice 
Martha Hodge 
Pearl Ray 

Mrs, W. H. Bowe of the Parkway- 
is -ponding the winter at the Hotel 
Fort Harrison in Clearwater, Flo- 
rida, 



RESIDENCE and At'TOMORII F 
EIRE and I I ABILITY 

INSURANCE 

Direct Local Agent— Strong 
Companies 

W. ALLAN WILDE 

3 Thompson St. Winchester S-HO0 

dee29-t/ 



WILLIAM S. WOLSEY 

Builder 

Winchester 6-1336 



myl'.'-tf 



See your Eye Physician 
and 

-i/Li. J(. Smtti 
Cjuttl Optician 

126 Main St. Tel. WOhurn 2-1704 




CO 

formerly CM. Fauci Co. mm 
139 My#t,c A„«.,M «d<ord 




T. -hI-, 



Lexington High 



Lee. If 
Cole. f 
McDonald rf 
Murash. rf 
Cunningham, 
Steven;., c 
S nelson, ik 
Hiffirtns. Ik 
Packard, rg 
Vslihura, rg 

Tota U 



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41 



COASTING STREETS 



In accordance with the by-laws. 
Article 3 section 8, the Board voted 
to set aside the following streets 
for coasting for the year 1951: 

Bonad road 

Bridge street 

Canal street 

Cutting street 

Englewood road (on to Bonad 

road) 
Everell road 
Fenwick road 
Forest Circle 
Glengarry road 
Lakeview road 
Ledyard mad 
Mad:.-.'n avenue West 
Myrtle street 
Nelson street 
Seneca road 

Wendell street ( from Loring ave- 
nue, westerly i 

Wildwood street extension (from 
Wtstland avenue to New Mea- 
dows road i 



^Sn/Jjll TWyo* Fr«c Parking- Op^9a-t*o « P*T 



Tel. Winchester 6-1271 Res. Winchester 6-3388- W 

FRED'S HOME SERVICE 

A complete home maintenance sen ire 
for your convenience. 

Children back to school'.' Now is the time to have your post 
holiday cleaning and inside repair and painting attended to, 

W e do any job around the home — none too large or too small. 



Kelley and Hawes Co. 

Established 1877 

Packers and Movers 

-: STORAGE :- 

SEMI- WEEKLY TRIPS 
MAINE, NEW HAMPSHIRE, CONNECTICUT, 
NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA, WASHINGTON. 



MAIN OFFICE 
5 PARK STREET, WINCHESTER 

Winchester 6-1477 

Formerly Winchester 6-0171 

CHAIRS and TABLES 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



BONDED AND INSURED CARRIERS 



m*:3-tf 



PU1LIC LIBRARY, 

VIMCXMT* 



til* 



THE WINCHESTER STAR. 



VOL. LXX NO. 21 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 12, 1951 



PRIC 



EN CENTS 




BELGIAN (.11 IS UE( El\ El) 



HERHETVT t. BALDWIN 

VICE.C'HAIRMAN RED ( ROSS 
DRIVE 

Herbert i.. Baldwin of 5 Ardley 
Place has been named a s Vice 
Chairman and Chairman of Public 
Information for the Boston Metro- 
politan Chaptei Tied Cross Drive of 
1961, it was announced this week. 
Announcement of his appointment 
was made jointly by Raymond C. 
Strawbridge of 47 Myrtle terrace, 
President of the Advertising Club 
of Boston and Charles F. Wood- 
ard, General Chairman of the lied 
doss Drive, Metropolitan Chapter, 
1951. 

The appointment of Baldwin was 
the result of the 700 members of 
the Boston Advertising Club of- 
fering, as a public service, to con- 
duct the public relations and adver- 
tising functions of the coming Red 
Cross drive. Baldwin, a member of 
the Advertising Club of Boston, 
was appointed by Strawbridge to 
direct the various activities which 
the Advertising Club will conduct 
to assist the Red Cross Drive. 

"Because this year's Red Cross 
Drive is doubly important, both be- 
cause we have men on fighting 
fronts, and because the Red Cross 
is the only organization at present, 
at least, ready to conduct any sort 
of adequate disaster assistance to 
the public in the event we are at- 
tacked" said Strawbridge "the Ad- 
vertising Club of Boston's officers 
offered the assistance of the club's 
membership in directing and con- 
ducting the public relations and in- 
formation efforts of the Metropoli- 
tan Chapter in this year's drive. 
General Chairman Woodard of the 
Red Cross accepted the offer and 
has appointed Herbert I-. Baldwin, 
one of our club members, who has 
agreed to serve as Vice Chairman 
and Chairman of Public Informa- 
tion for the drive which starts on 
March i. The Advertising Club 
will have as many of its members 
as is necessary actively in the 
drive under Baldwin's direction. 
The Club is glad to be able to offer 
and perform this public service 
in a time of national crisis." 

Raldwin. a newspaperman and 
former night city editor of the Bos- 
ton Post was formerly for over P.' 
years Publicity Managei of the 
Boston and Maine Railroad and the 
Maine Central Railroad. Later he 
served, for two years as Assistant 
Vice President in Charge of Public 
Relations and Advertising for the 
New Haven Railroad, being dis- 
charged from the post last August 
in the puree of off eials under the 
Dumaine regime, 

Since September 1st last he has 
headed his own firm of public 
relations consultants, Herbert I.. 
Baldwin and Associates. At the 
present time the Baldwin firm is 
directing the efforts of the Massa- 
chusetts Council o n Employment 
Security to change the Massachu- 
setts unemployment law. and is also 
directing the public relations ef- 
forts of Northeastern University 
to raise $1,500,000 for the con- 
struction of a new library on the 
Northeastern campus. 



ipate in, 
at marked 
ift- sent tc 
ster by the 



the 
the 
the 
vii- 



I 'let u res from Hemroulle ( hapel 
Presented to V\ inchester < hutches 

Snow came la-t Sunday to add 
still another bond between the 
people of Hemroulle in Bastogno, 
Belgium, and of Winchestei in 
Massachu.-etts, as moie than 50IJ 
residents of Winchester gathered 
at tin hitfh school auditorium to 
attend, and pal tic 
I formal exercises th 
acceptance of the c 
churches of VVinche 
lagei s ot Hemroulle. 

It was. snowing on Christmas 
Eve in 1944 when the Hemroulle- 
Winehester friendship began, and 
the most severe snowstorm of the 
new winter was in progress when 
i the latest chapter in this inter- 
national story involving the old and 
the new world was written last 
Sunday, 

During the snowy Christmas 
Eve in 1944 Hemroulle villagers, 
summoned by the ringing of their 
i hapel Wells on the older of Mayor 
Victor Gaspard, lent their sheets 
to the 502nd Airborne Battalion, 
commanded by I.:. Col. "Jack" 
Hanlon of Winchester and assigned 
to defend Hemroulle from Nazi 
hordes during the Battle of the 
Bulge. 

Camouflaged by the sheets, the 
paratroopers fought off the Nazis 
with comparatively small losses, 
, but Col. Hanlon, who had promised 
to return the sheets after the bat. 
tie, was ordered on with his troops 
before he could fulfill his promise. 

It wasn't until he was in Europe 
after the war as a free lance news- 
paper writer that he visited Hem- 
roulle and learned fiom Mayo! 
Gaspard that many of the villagers 
still were without sheets because of 
giving all their bed-linen to the 
American soldiers in 1944, 

".lack" or "Steamer", as he has 
been known since his football days 
at Winchester High, determined to 
do something for his friends in 
Hemroulle and to make pood his 
word given to the villagers in 1914. 

Returning to this country, be 
told his story to a sympathetic 
press and enlisted the aiil of Mis. 
Kenneth R. Toye to form a Win- 
chester Committee charged with 
the job of getting together enough 
sheiis to return those borrowed 
from the Hemroulle people during 
the Battle of the Bulge. 

So well did the committee func- 
tion under the able guidance of 
Mrs. Toye that several hundred 
sheets were brought to the high 
school auditorium at a public meet- 
inn held in the fall of 1(147. In 
addition to the sheets collected on 
that day there were sheets sent 
i in from all over the country with 
money to buy more sheets from far 
and near, and even from abroad. 

These sheets, packed by Filene's, 
as a service to the cause, were sent 
abroad by the Boston Globe, which 
paper also sent Mr. Hanlon to 
Hemroulle to return the sheets in 
person. 

So deeply were the villagers 
touched by the return of their 
sheets and the friendly gesture 
made by Winchester in getting 
them together, that they treasured 
the memory of the events and de- 
termined to d<> something foi theii 
friends in America. 

l.a-t Kummei during a visit of 
Hi. Albert N'avez, Belgian Consul 
for New England, it was determin- 
ed by Mayor Gaspard and othei 
leading villagers to take from theii 
little chapel the old oil paintings 
of the Stations of the Cross and 
churches of Win. 
en of friendship 
emroulle had not 



hosen to receive 



MISS BARK, MR. BLISS 
ENGAGED 

Mr and Mrs. Lawrence F. Bert 

of Melrose announce the engage- 
ment of Mis. Bergs daughter, Miss 
.lean Bait, to Richard Taylor Bliss, 
son of Mrs. Chester T. Bliss of 
Winchester and West Yarmouth, 
and the late Mr. Bliss. 

Miss Ran. daughter of Mr. 
David Ban of Cambridge, was 
graduated from t h e Chandlei 
School. Mi. Bliss attended Clark 
School and Babson Institute aftei 
serving two years with the Air 
Force. 



send them to the 
chester as a to! 
and proof that I 
forgotten. 

Churches were 
the gifts, not alone because of the 
religious significance of the pic- 
tures, but because it was the Hem- 
roulle chapel bell that summoned 
the Belgians to bring their sheets 
for the American troops in 1944, 
and it was the churches of Win- 
chester that rang their bells in l!»47 
to summon Winchester residents to 
the high school with their recipro- 
cal gifts of sheets. 

( Continued on page 8) 



ENGAGEMENT 



Mr. and Mis. Howard C. Reusch 
of Shaker Heights, Ohio, announce 
the engagement of their daughter. 
Lois Jean to Mi. Bernard K. Rassat 
of Cleveland, son of the late Mr. 
and Mrs. Edgar F. Rassat, for- 
merly of Winchester, 

Miss Reusch is a graduate of 
Allegheny College. Meadville, Pa. 
Mr. Rassat is a graduate of Babson 
Institute, Wellesley Hills. Mass. 



Subscribe To The STAR 

Still $2.50 a Year 

Quite a Saving over the New 
Single Copy Price of 10c. 



V\ e deliver free! Save yourself money 
ami the possibility of missing the copy 
you want most. 

WRITE — PHONE — DROP IN 

THE WINCHESTER STAR 

;i Church Street 1.1. Winchester (>.(X)29 




SCHOOL HEARING OF LITTLE 
VALUE 



MI'S N M. NICHOLS 
N IN CHESTER RED ( BOSS 

Mrs. Nathaniel M. Nichols has 
been named Honorary Chairman of 
the 1951 Red Cross? Fund Campaign 
in Winchester. Mrs. Nichols has 
been a Ib d Cross wo) her in this 
town foi many year-. The cam- 
paign's house-to-house canvass will 
lie concent rated in tli'<\ Cross Sun- 
day, March i. 

Mi. James S. Allen has been 
named Honorary Vice-Chairman of 
the 1051 lied Cross Fund Cam- 
paign. Mi. Allen was Winchestei 
Chaptei Chairman in the last war. 
The fund drive on March 4 will 
also enroll those who could like to 
participate in the blood donor pro- 
gram. 

The Junior Red Cross at the 
George Washington School received 
a thank you letter last week from 
a school in India which received 
one of the Washington School's 
gift boxes. The school was Devi 
Sahai S. I > High School, Jullundui 
( 'ity, Punjab. 

The Motor Corps brought enter- 
tainers from the Boston V. W, C. A. 
to the Bedford Veterans' Hospital 
last Monday. Two hospital calls 
were made the same day. Five 
pints of blood were obtained foi 
the Winchestei Hospital on Jan- 
uary 5. 

A first aid class for Civil De- 
fense workers will begin Monday 
evening in the basement of the 
Town Hall. The class will be held 
every Monday evening from 7:30 
to 9:30 for nine weeks. The in- 
structor will be Mr. William Hoi. 
dich. Mr. Gerald Y. Mills plans to 
organize a group of trained first- 
aiders in the Chamois Ski Club. 

The Home Nursing (lass is 
scheduled to begin the last of this 
month or early in February. A 
class foi new Nurse's Aides will 
also begin in February. Mean- 
the Winchestei Chapter 
like to hear from former 
's Aides who would like to 
become active again. 

A meeting ot precinct leaders 
was held in the Town Hall Monday 
evening by 1051 Campaign officers, 
A group of typists began on the 
paper work for the fund drive the 
next day. 

SOMIN VTION PAPERS oi l 



whih 
wool 
Nurs 



Nomination papers aie m cireu. 
lation foi the following candidates 
foi town office at the March elec- 
tion : 

Assessor 
Alfred l>. Elliott 

Cemetery Commissioners 
Herman F. Pike 
Kenneth P, pond 

( 'ollei tor of Taxes 
Donald Heath 
Henry P. Murray 

< onstables 
Gleason W. Rverson 
Joseph T. Caliahan 
John T. Horn 
Ernest E. Parker 
Thomas J. McKee 
Michael J. Penta 
Laurence Humphrey 

Park Commissioners - (3 yrs.) 
Earle L. Smith 
John W. Smith, Jr. 

(2 yrs. i 
Eugene M. Pollard 

Library Trustees - (3 yrs.) 
Marianne C. Keyes 
Leon F. Sargent 

(2 yrs. I 
John C. Willis 

School Committee 
Howard R, Bartlett 

Town Clerk 
Mabel W. Stinson 

Town Treasurer 
E. Abbot Bradlee 

Water and Sewer Board 
Erskine N. White 



The healing under the auspices 
of the School Building Committee 
Tuesday evening at the town hall, 
not out neither a large crowd noi 
resulted ;n any bridging of the gap 
between school opponents and pi-, 
portents. The situation as it 
affects the proposal to enlarge the 
j inior high school to house a four- 
year senior high school and fix up 
the present senior high school foi 
use a- a two-year junior high is 
right where it was before the hear- 
ing was held. 

Opponents of the plan for the 
interchange of buildings, proposed 
[by the School Building Committee 
, as an alternate plan to constructing 
a new junior high school on Lake 
street, were invited to attend the I 
bearing and express their objec- 
tions to the plan so that if possible, 
the Committee can make such al- 
terations in their preliminary 
sketches as to satisfy the objectors 
and result in a united support for 
the plans which Will come up foi I 
consideration again at a special 
town meeting to be held January 
20. 

If the opponents of the plan were 
present in any sort of numbers, 
they were quiet enough at the hear- 
ing. Captain Richard M. Rush, 
who has been a leadei in opposing 
the School Building Committee's 
proposed plan, read a brief state- 
ment from the Referendum Com 
niittee, which appears in full on the 
editorial page of this week's Star. 

Briefly, his statement was to the 
effect that the Referendum Com- 
mittee takes the position the "A I. 
ternato Plan" of the Building Com- 
mittee was rejected by the town a; 
the recently held referendum. Con- 
sequently the Referendum Com- 
mittee can see no further need foi 
consideration or discussion of the 
plan. 

Aside from his prepared state- 
ment which was offered without 
comment by the Captain, and with- 
out amplification by any other 
member of the Referendum Com- 
mittee, nothing resembling a con- 
crete objection to the Building 
Committee's plan was voiced. 
Everyone who spoke seemed in 
favor of the plan, and asked only 
information to clear up some in- 
dividual aspect of the plan about 
which they had been puzzled. In 
fact some of the questions seemed 
obviously a bit forced, in order to 
keep things moving until the real 
[opponents of the plan got onto the 
tiring line. 

They never got there, and re- 
fused to be smoked out, even after 
strong invitations to speak were 
offered by Mr. Hatch of the Plan, 
ning Board, Prof. Borden, formei 
School (ominittc member, and 
Mr Fieeman. 

The latter sought a pledge from 
fbe School Building Committee 
that its members would retain an 
open mind and discuss any ob- 
jections to the plan which may be 
made to individual members, or to 
the committee as a whole between 
now and the date for the special 
Town Meeting. 

This pledge was immediately 
made by Mrs. Kimball, chairman 
of the Building Committee, who 
opened the meeting and meed 
every one to feel free to present 
his views on the school plans dur- 
ing the session. 

(Continued on page 5 1 




JAMF.S A. CULI.F.N 



Former Winchester Selectman 
elected Chairman of the Middle- 
sex County Board of Commission- 
ers last Friday. Mr. Culleh was 
elected to the Board in 1948 for 
fotii years. He had been serving 
as Chairman since last November 
when the then Chairman, Melvin 
Rogers, was defeated for re-elec- 
tion and stepped down to permit 
Mr. Cullen to take over the Chair- 
manship for the balance of the 
year. He is said to he the First 
Democratic Chairman in the his- 
tory of the Board. 

DOCTORS, DENTISTS, 
VETERINARIANS Ml ST 
REGISTER MONDAY 

All male doctors, dentists and 
veterinarians under 50 years of age 
w ho are not registered in the Selec- 
tive Service System's Special Reg- 
istration for men in their profes- 
sions must present themselves for 
registration between the hours > > f 
8:00 a. m. and 5:00 p. m., Monday. 
January 15. 1951, Col. Chester A 
Furbish, State Director of Selec- 
tive Service, announced today. 

Relieved from the obligation of 
I registering. Col, Furbish said, are 
men presently on active duty in the 
Aimed Forces, members of re- 
i serve components of the Armed 
| Forces and certain alien-- whom the 
law exempts. 

In passing the law requiring their 
registration and authorizing their 
induction through the Selective 
Service System. Congress divided 
doctors and others subject to the 
law into four classes, designated as 
Priorities 1, 2. 3 and 4, the State 
Director pointed out. 

Asked to define the different 
Priorities. Col. Furbish said, "Tile 
First Priority includes men who re- 
ceived all or part of their profes- 
sional education in programs spon- 
sored by the Army and Navy or 
were deferred from military ser- 
vice during World War II to con- 
tinue their studies and had less 
than lid day- of active duty subse- 
quent to being released from 
their military program or the com 
pletion of their education." 

"The Second Priority includes 
men similarly educated or deferred 
who had more than 00 day- id' ac- 
tive duty hut less than ji months 
under the same terms governing 
Priority I; the Third includes men 
not in military service during World 
War II. while in the Fourth an- 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
.1 VM ARY 29 

Tlie Board of Selectmen, acting 
on the petition of some tUK) regis- 
tered voters of tiie town, have set 
Monday evening, January 21'. as the 
! date foi tlu- special town meeting, 
being called to consider exclusively 
• tiie question of providing increased 
■ space and facilities for our second- 
ary school facilities. 

This special town meeting :.- the 
outgrowth of the recently held 
; referendum, setting aside ihe ac- 
tion of a previous special town 
| fleeting, held November 30, appro- 
I printing some $1,600,000 to enlarge 
the present junior high school and 
| remodel the senior high school to 
house respectively a four-year se- 
nior high school ami a two-year 
' junioi high school. 

Because of bond issues involved 
I two-thirds votes were necessary, 
[both at the special town meeting 
i November 30 and at the subsequent 
j referendum. At the town meeting 
the majorities were overwhelming, 
only five votes being recorded in 
opposition to the junior high school 
i enlargement plan, and four votes 
against the alteration of the high 
school. 

Despite this fact referendum pe- 
titions with tlie requisite number 
of names were filed and a referen- 
dum vote W8S held, resulting in the 
defeat of the previously passed 
school proposals by respectively .">7 
and 2M votes, the school advocates 
failing by these small margins of 
getting the necessary two-thirds of 
the small vote cast. 

Almost before tile precinct 
booths cooled off from their use at 
the referendum petitions for a 
special town meeting, once more to 
consider the school question, were; 
Jin circulation, and many more than ] 
the necessary number of names ' 
were easily secured. 

The Selectmen have no option in 
the matter of calling a special town 
meeting if two hundred or more 
registered voters ask for one, so 
at their meeting Monday evening, 
action was taken on the petition 1 
and the January 20th date for the 
special session was set. 

ST, M \RVS SODALITY 



nu 



WILL OBSERVE 5STH 
w EDDING ANNIVERSARY 



Rev. and Mrs. Edward H. New- 
comb, who make their home with 
their daughter, Mrs. Ruth B. Har- 
ris, at 2:5 Stevens street, are oh- 
serving their 68th wedding anni- 
versary today. 

Rev. Newcomb is a retired Con- 
gregational minister, having last 
served the parish of the First Con- 
gregational Church in Kittery, Me. 
He is x:: years old and his wife. X\. 
Both are in good health. 

The Star wishes to extend to 
Rev. and Mrs. Newcomb its heart- 
iest congratulations and best 
wishes for their continued health 
and happiness. 



■n not included 
cond Priorities 
vice during t hi 
Unless commis 
deferred. Spceia 



and 

five 



the First 
.vh"> had a 
war." 

ohed or other- 
Regist rants 
to the Armed 
>d for induct ion 
rity and within 
quence of date 

with t h e 



ENGAGEMENT 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Mc- 
Elhinney of mi Main street an- 
nounce the engagement of their 
daughter. Catherine Agnes, to Mr. 
Paul B. Farrell, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Farrell of Dorchester. 
A September wedding is planned. 



MARRIAGE INTENTIONS 

Henry Carpenter Heitz, Jr.. 11 
Hill street, and Ann Eunice Dou- 
cette. It Middlesex street. 

Peter Dennis Benkus, T»i Ash- 
land street, Lynn, and Virginia 
Rose Tanso. 92 Forest street. 

Austine Joseph O'Connor. Jr.. 46 
Hinckley road. Milton, and Mary 
Patricia Burns, 27 Wedgemere ave- 
nue. 

EVENING COMMUNION 
\T CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
CHURCH 



found acceptabl 
Forces, will he cal 
in sequence of Pri 
each Priority in > 
o f birth, eomrnencinj 

youngest. 

Men in the first two Priorities 
w ere registered last October 15 and 
currently are being classified and 
given physical examinations b y 
their local boards. No date has 
been set by National Selective Ser- 
vice Headquarters for the classi- 
fication and physical examination 
of the new group, Col. Furbish con- 
cluded. 

Local Selective Service officials 
announced that the registration in 
this area will take place at the of- 
fice of the local board located at 
Room 9, City Hall. Medford. 

Additional offices where Special 
Registration will take place are 
Selectman's Office, Town Hall; 
Veterans' Services, Towanda Club. 
Abbott street, Wohurn ; and Law- 
rence Memorial Hospital, Medford. 
Ward K. Second Floor, hours, 8i30 
a. m. - 4:30 p. m. 

NO TICKETS™ 

Are available f o r tonight's 
basketball game with Belmont at 
the high school gym. 



The First Church of Christ 
Scientist on Mt. Vernon street will 
hold an evening Communion Ser- 
vice at 7:30 0 clock on Sunday, 
January 14. The public is cordially 
invited to attend this service. 



FROM THE OFFICE OF THE 
COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



The following facts pertaining to the collection of taxes as 
of December 31, 1050 should be of interest to all tax payers in 
the town. 

The Board of Assessors committed to the Collector of Taxes 
the following amounts for collection for the year 1050: 



Amount Committed 



Real Estate 
Personal Property 
Poll 

Motor Vehicle Excise 



$1,281,500.10 
111,638.70 
9,978 00 
15o.oSii.37 



Per cent Collected 

96.6 
99.6 
99.7 
93.3 



100 . of the 1949 Real Estate taxes were collected. For the 
first time for at least twenty years, no property wen; into Tax 



NOMINATION 
PAPERS 




Nomination Papers for the 
nomination of candidates in- 



cluding Ton n 
heps, to be 
March 5, 1951, 
mitted to the 
\ oters for certification of 
-itinatures on same on or be- 
fore ) o'clock on the after- 
noon of January 29. 1951. 



Meeting mem- 
voted for on 
must be sub- 
registrars of 



Ho» ard S 
(.eorsje J, 
Harr> J. 



. < OMgrove 
Barbaro 
Donov an 



Mabel W. Stinson 
Registrars of Voter* 



On Tuesday evening, January 
16th at the K. of C. Hall, there 
will be a showing of movies of the 
recent pilgrimage of Archbishop 
Gushing to the many shrines of 
Europe. The program is being 
sponsored by The Blessed Virgin 
Sodality of St. Mary's Parish. The 
motion pictures will be shown by 
the Rev. Joseph F. Ryan of St. 
Mary's Church, ("harlestown, who 
will furnish an interesting com- 
mentary throughout. 

The technicolor showing includes 
trips to Fatima; the many beau- 
tiful Basilicas of Rome: Tlu Grotto 
at Lourdes; The Passion Play at 
Oberammergau which is held once 
in every ten year-;: Lisieux, the 
Home of ihe Little Flower: Paris 
and the Blessed Catherine La. 
boure Mother House: also scenes 
of London, and a tour of Ireland. 
A special feature id' the film will 
he the audience with Pope Pius 
XII that was arranged for the Bos- 
ton Pilgrimage Party. 

Immediately after a brief meet- 
ing of the Sodality in the lower 
Church, followed by Benediction 
and the Rosary the members ard 
their friends will proceed to the 
K. of c. Hall for tlie instructive and 
interesting program. There will 
be no charge for admission. 

MISS MI KB VY ENG \GED TO 
MIC < RANI) \LL 

Mr. and Mrs. .lame- I-'. Mm ay of 
131 Washington street, announce 
the engagement of their daughter, 
Anne France-, to Mr. Louis K. 
Crandall. Jr., son of Mrs. Louis K. 
Crandall and the late Mr. Crandall 
of Stonington. < onn., 

Miss Murray is a graduate of 
Winchester High School and B. U , 
Sargent College. Miss .Murray is on 
the Faculty of Bloomfield High 
School, in Conn. 

Mr. Crandall is a grrduate of 
Stonington High School and Rhode 
I sland State < 'ollege. 

FIREMEN ELECT 



The Winchester Fireman - Re- 
lied' Association, at a meeting held 
Monday evening elected the fol- 
lowing officers to serve foi the 
ensuing year: 

President. Joseph Connolly 
Vice President. Neil Kerrigan 
Treasurer. John J. Flaherty 
Secretary. Captain E. D. Fitzger- 
ald 

The Association voted to hold a 
concert and ball this year as usual, 
choosing April »'. as a tentative 
date for the affair. 




M \ RSH \ I 1 U. PIHt 

M VKSH ALL R. PIHL 
Fi l l TED I RI S I FF 

Marshall R. Pihl, of the Park- 
way, Town Assessor, has been re- 
elected a Trustee of tlie Massachu- 
setts Board of Real Estate Ap- 
praisers which he collaborated ill 
establishing about eighteen years 
ago. He is also Legal Counsel of 
the Board whose membership con- 
sists id' Realtors who specialize in 
real estate appraisal. 

Among bis extra interests, Mr. 
Pihl is Co-ordinater of tlie Real 
Estate Courses at the Boston Uni- 
versity Evening College of Com- 
merce, and lectures on Real Estate 
| Investments at Babson Institute. 

Specializing m Real E-tale Law 
and Real Estate Taxation, Mr. 
Pihl has long been recognized as 
an authority in that field and is 
Attorney for several Boston banks. 

SIGN Fit LETTER TO 
PRESIDENT TR IMA N 

Prof. Norman .1. Padelford of >; 
Ravenscroft road, professor of In- 
ternational Relation.-; at Massachu- 
setts Institute id' Technology, and 
I 'can Robert B. Stewart ot the 
Fletcher School of I. a w and Diplo- 
macy at Tufts College, whose home 
i- at i'>o Oxford street, are among 
25 prominent Massachusetts resi- 
dents who signed a letter to Presi- 
dent Harry S. Truman urging him 
to take the lead in calling into be- 
ing the Atlantic Union already pro- 
posed in Congress. 

The letter suggests the presi- 
dent consult the governments of 
France. Croat Britain and Canada, 
regarding the practicability of es- 
tablishing a Provisional Union to 
meet the current supreme crisis. 
It suggests furthei that the Presi- 
dent invite the i\ democracies that 
sponsored the North Atlantic 
Treaty: France, Belgium, Nether- 
lands, Luxembourg, Canada and 
the United Kingdom, to name de- 
legate; representing their princi- 
pal politico! parties, to meet with 
bipartisan delegates id' Cue United 
States in a federal convention. 
This convention would then in- 
cite other democracies wherevei 
-'tuuted to join in exploring how 
far their peoples can apply the 
;.i ncipals of free federal union 
within tlie framework of the 
United Nation-. 

i OMING F V r NTS 



■ I, 

T'-e,i,leinu, pi 
vV'i • i . 
H.itu Si-boel ii 
■ 

It, An Ileum. 
■ h'st-i- II. 
- hum.- slides 
■unt il. l-v M 
'atmars 



lie— lie 

l,.|l. Met 



I..' 



Win. 
Ktnlie 

\llti>. 



lloOinmrii! frnm 
Jtihti Chi|>nu,n. 
Tliio-.ilm, '', : ,ii p Hi. - 
I'per Mii initr Men - - <' uli Kirst lVmi(i<- 
national Churrh Tin' T'n'krr- PomCMty 
i.-nl rtiiinmi-nt mmMhitiS nwntjil u»|pp«t:hy. 
nwif ii* afw! jriHul humor. In luMOiim sun?* 
by the Mvsti.- tilt*. Club Ujuartct. Stippci 
OHi' 81,25. 

.Iioniary Is, Tbui -iliiv, 7 : ',0 p. ni tfl il 
ii m. - |in<lmin*»n in ihf Iliirh Srhuol 
Kytnnasiuf!! fur WinrheMf r ml lis. 

.Innnnry 20, Sntitrdfty. - :00 p. m. - 
WinrhiptiT HiHttiHcul Swift y. Hay State 
lli-tei icul I...«t'iM' Curat ,.f Ronton Uni- 
.irsity. Speaker- lir Daniol ], Marsh 
i'r.-nlen' . anil fir Ruben K. Mumlv oti 
"I!.. -ten Men atiif tin- Winning "f Amcri- 

(•ari 111 epen.lenre. " 

January 24, We<!n«»s»iay, 7:45 p. m - An- 
nual Meeii'.v .,f The Pariah irf >he Kpi. 
lilianv at Parish Houae. Heating I ' . n . I 
Campaign will be launchiM 

January *$, H. Thursday, Friday. 
Saturday - VVintnn I 'lot, Cabaret, Town 
Hall. 9;«0 p. m. 

February ". Monday, Min p. m - Win. 
r-hester Hiirh Srhonl \uditnrium Panel i|Ib- 
ruswion "A .nlesceni e : whirr, way 



'iiroy ■"' Pur :>l 
Junior High Am 

February >.. 
Night Hub. Kim 
"Country Dance 



Ma- 

parents, -pnnsored by 

w-lates 

Tuesday - Wednesday 
Congregational Churrh, 
• mi Sugar-Hut." 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

FIRST AID CLASSES 

Civil Defense training teaches people how to perform the 
services needed before, during, and after an enemy attack. In 
conformity with our Civil Defense training program it is planned 
that all workers receive basic training in standard First Aid. 
Due to existing conditions and for the protection of our commu. 
nity should an emergency arise, it is essential that First Aid 
training be made available to the iargest number possible. 

Classes in First Aid under the direction of Winchester Chap- 
ter, American Red Cross, will commence the week of January 15, 
The first class is now rilled and additional classes are being or- 
ganised, the dates to be announced. They will be held one evening 
each week from 7:30 until 9:30 I'. M. Those interested should 
communicate with the local office of the Red Cross, telephone 
WInehe>ter 6-2300 or the Department of Civil Defense, te-ienhon-- 
Winchester 'i-3257. Both of these offices are in the Town Hail. 



James 
Direct' 



.cknam 

ivil Defenst 



2 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 12. 1951 




EVERY MVSSTVK SHOULD KNOW 
ABOUT THESE UTILITIES 



WE HAVE A PLAN TO SI IT EVERYONE 
WITH OR WITHOUT PRINCIPAL PAYMENTS 
AT REASONABLE INTEREST RATES 

VP TO TWENTY YEARS TO PAY 

G. I. — CONSTRUCTION — DIRECT REDUCTION 

SEE US IF YOU ARE PLANNING TO 
HI H I) — BUY - OR REFINANCE 
YOUR PRESENT MORTGAGE 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 

Telephone Winchester 6-2130 

Winchester Savings Bank 

26 MT. VERNON ST. ^^H^x WIN CHESTER, MASS 



MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 8 A M TO 2 P M. ^ 



NOT OPEN SATURDAYS 



INCORPORATED 187 



WINCHESTER 




THIRD K NOW- YOl |{- HOSPITAL 
EVENING 



Another of the short scries of in- 
formational evenings will he staged 
at 8 o'clock on Thursday, January 
lKth, in the Living Room of the 
Winchester Hospital Nurses' Home. 
Everyone who has had hospital ex- 
perience directly or through fami- 
ly or friends will find the subjects 
of this panel specially important. 
You are invited to come and to 
join in the exchange of questions 
and answers. Coffee is served at 
7:45, and the program begins 
promptly at eight o'clock, with 
Mrs. George A. Marks as Chair- 
man. The new women's auxiliary, 
"Friends of Winchester Hospital," 
is sponsoring the series as part of 
ts first year's service to its mem- 
bers and the community. 

The subject of Medical Records 
will be presented by Mrs. Mabel L. 
Bayers, Medical Record Librarian, 
who is in charge of this department 
at Winchester Hospital. Using an 
authentic patient'.- record as a basis 
for her talk, Mrs. Mayers will show- 
how the full history of a case is 



built up. and what parts the doctor, 
the nurse, and the record room play 
ill making the entries at the proper 
time and in the approved form. She 
Will tell enough about classifica- 
tion and terminology to give us a 

.better understanding of the need 
of having a hospital record room 
expertly staffed, and of the reasons 

[why the American College of Sur- 
geons emphasizes this department 
in its rating of a hospital. 

The other important subject to 
be discussed by the speakers and 
audience is that of the hospital's 
"front office" with its many ser- 

j vices to the public. This is the of- 
fice where patients are admitted, 
where their charges are recorded 
and accounts issued, where the tele- 
phone switchboard is located, and 
where the Cray Ladies now stand 

int the desk during visiting hours. 
Miss Ada R. Sleeth will present all 
t hese problems and many others, in- 
cluding Blue Cross payments, and 
the most recent addition to the 
iasks of the office, namely, that of 
Social Security deductions from 
salaries and wages, which have 
gone into effect with January 1, 
l!>5l, following the decision of the 
Directors to make Social Security 
benefits available to the hospital 
employees and the favorable vote 
of the employees themselves. 

Even if you have missed the first 

' two numbers of this series, it is 
worthwhile to take advantage of 
the program on the 18th, and of the 
other three to be given during 
March. April, and May. An under- 
standing of hospital service as- 
sures fuller participation in all of 
its advantages. 

WINCHESTER DRUG COMPANY 
CHANGES HANDS 




THK TUCKERS 



FIRST CON GREG VTIONAL 
MEN S CLUB 




MOFFETT 
FUNERAL SERVICE 

M. G. MOFFETT 

Reg. Funeral Director and 
Embalmer 

177 Washington Street. Winchester 

Tel. \\ luchester 6-1730 

m»13-tf 



Announcement was made this 
week of the purchase of the Win- 
chester Drug Company, at 564 
Main street by Earl H. Hutt, Reg- 
istered Pharmacist, who will con- 
tinue the business under his per- 
sonal management. 

Mr. Hutt was born in Westboro, 
and for the past eight years was 
associated with the pharmacy in 
that town. A graduate of West- 
boro High School, he has also grad- 
uated from the I'nited States Me- 
dical Corps School at San Diego. 
California, and from the Massa- 
chusetts College of Pharmacy in 
Boston, holding the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy. 

Mr. Hutt has moved to Winches- 
ter and intends to make the town 
his home. He is presently living 
at 62 Bacon street. 



Thursday evening, January 18th, 
6:30 p. m„ Parish Hall. Supper: 

j "Swedish Chicken" menu. Pro- 
gram: The Tuckers. 

All members and wives of the 
Church and their friends are in- 
vited to come and enjoy an evening 
of fun with the brilliant young 

I mentalists, The Tuckers. 

People from coast-to-coast and 
in fifteen foreign countries have en- 

; joyed this comedy entertainment of 
astonishing telepathy, riotous 
spirit seances, and hilarious au. 
dience participation. A wonder- 
fully fast -moving program, already 
enjoyed by over three million 
people, who enjoy a smashing suc- 
cess. They're terrific, sophisticat- 
ed, amusing and amazing! Come 
and see for yourself. 

As an added attraction, the very 
popular quartette from the Mystic 
Glee Club, composed of Ben Mar- 
shall, William Hopkins, William 
Towner, and James deRevere will 
entertain us with their tine sing- 
ing. 

Don't delay! Be sure to make an 
early reservation to be assured of 
j an evening of smiles, chuckles and 
laughs! 



OFFFTT NURSERY SCHOOL 
BEGINS 5TH YEAR 



THE METHODIST YOFTH 
FELLOWSHIP NEWS 



Next Sunday, January 14, the 
planning committee will meet at 
5:00 p. m. The fellowship will meet 
at 6:30 p. m. To become acquainted 
with their counselors, Mr. Pingree 
and Mr. Mingins, they will hear 
talks presented by each of them. 




The Dorothea B. Offutt Nursery 
School will begin its 5th year on 
January loth. Mrs. Offutt has 
been very successful in working 
with her select small groups and 
has received commendations from 
families in Winchester as well as 
cities all over the country to which 
her pupils have moved. Her school 
has had an excellent health record, 
with no epidemics of children's dis- 
eases in four years. 

Mrs. Offutt is a graduate of 
Jackson College for Women at 
Tufts College, and has taught in 
the Newport, N. H., Milford, N. H., 
and Lexington. Massachusetts 
school systems as well as the Bart- 
lett School in Arlington, and as 
substitute in the Winchester school 
system. Mrs. Offutt has had prac- 
tical as well as professional experi- 
ence in that she has two small 
daughters. 

Mrs. Offutt is planning to con- 
duct a Summer Play-School this 
year during July and August. Her 
home is so situated that she has her 
own private beach on Wedge Pond 
where she will have a fenced in 
wading area for the children. Her 
fall term will begin around the 
middle of September. 




LOCAL and DISTANT 

NON-SECTARIAN 
• 

Prict Range to S«rr« AM 
Information Upon B>q» j — I 

OFFICES & CHAPELS 
CENTRALLY LOCATED 

Waterman 




Write, phone or stop in for your free copy 
of our new survey of utility companies, 
each representing an opportunity to in- 
vest in the great future of Electrical Living. 



AjQALLYN & CO. 



Members *>t 

New York Stock Exchange Midwest Stock Exchange 

New York C urb Exchange (Associate) 



MM HICK C HIRI). Kegistond !!. pn-, t.tathc 
30 Federal Street. l!..-t..n. Ma--, 
Tvli'phonv: II tmack (>-IJ~)<> 



< hicago 



New York 



Boston 



LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS 

At the joint meeting of the 
League and the Fortnightly on Jan- 
uary 8, Mrs. L A. Richards, who 
was in Peking from April to Aug- 
ust, 1P50, gave a most interesting 
talk on "Life in China Today." 
Mrs. Richards, stressed the skill of 
the Communists in spreading pro- 
paganda, and the fact that many 
Chinese who are not in sympathy 
with the Russian ideas supported 
the present government because 
Chiang's regime was completely 
corrupt. 

The twenty-ninth School of In- 
ternational Relations, conducted by 
the Massachusetts League, will 
meet at Radcliffe on January 24th 
and 2oth. On Wednesday evening 
the 24th, Sir Benegal Ran, Chief 
Delegate from India to the United 
Nations, will be the speaker at the 
Rindge Technical High School. Any- 
one interested in course or single 
tickets may contact Mrs. Rowland 
Patrick at Winchester 0-.T29H as to 
price, or send in the application in 
the current League Bulletin. 



< OMVII'1 I FF OP SAFETY 
CHAPTER, D. A. R. 



PAST NOBLE GRAN DS 

The Christmas Parly of the Past 
Noble Grands Service Club of Vic- 
toria Rebekah Lodge was held on 
Wednesday evening, December 27, 
1950 at the new home of Mrs. 
George Bragdon, North Woburn, 
Massachusetts. 

The meeting was led by the Pres- 
ident, Miss Olive Stevenson. Our 
"Good Time" evening was discussed 
hut no definite plans made. The 
Mystery was won by Mrs. Henry 
Roberts. Our January meeting 
will be with Mrs. Josephine Arnold. 
Plans for a Covered Dish Supper 
in February were discussed. 

After the meeting gifts were ex- 
changed and delicious refreshments 
were served by the Hostess at a 
very prettily decorated table. 

Many thanks Peggy and Good 
Luck to you and George in your 
new home! 

Stuart S. Rae. fire control tech- 
nician, third class, USN, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Rae of 229 
Pond street, is serving aboard the 
destroyer USS Massey in Korean 
waters. 



The Committee of Safety Chap- 
ter, Daughters of the American 
Revolution, will meet in the Ladies' 
Parlor of the First Congregational 
church on Monday, January 15 at 
2:80 p. m. 

The guest speaker, Mrs. David D. 
Nickeison of Maiden arid Quincy, 
will use as her subject, ••There is 
a Tide - - -." 

For many years as Grand Vice 
President of Pi Beta Phi fraternity, 
Mrs. Nickeison traveled through- 
out the United States and Canada 
counseling with Deans of Women 
as to policies and plans for better- 
ment of campus life. 

As a former State Chairman of 
the Department of Education of 
the Federation of Women's Clubs 
of Massachusetts, she helped to in- 
augurate several new trends in 
education. She is President of 
Willcox Hall in Maiden and an in- 
corporator of the Panhellenic House 
connected with Boston University, 
as well as one of its directors. 

She is trustee of Maiden Hospital 
and teaches a class in Parliamen- 
tary Law. She has done editorial 
work for the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts on Tax Publications. 
One of her most interesting activi- 
ties is the illustrating of deluxe 
editions of books on art, history, 
music, and opera, among which the 
$•".,000. deluxe edition on American 
Indians is outstanding. 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 
January 15-31 

Picture 

Framing 

at 

Winslow Press 
on 

% Common Street 

^7J. .>M>1. 




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Inc. 

632 Main St. Winchester, Mass. 

TEL. Winchester 6-3133 



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" JANUARY 1J-J1 




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Church Street Opposite Winchester Trust Co. 

For 



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BROILERS - FRYERS - ROASTERS 

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FRESH FRUIT and VEGETABLES 

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WI 6-2332 WI 6-0534 

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THE FINEST IN 

TELEVISION 

FROM $180.50 UP. 

Philco Refrigerators AT NEW 
LOW PRICES 

RADIO AND TELEVISION SERVICE 
AT REASONABLE PRICES 

PARK RADIO CO. 

618 MAIN STREET Winchester 6-2280 

Serving Winchester for Over 17 Years 




Cummings the Florist 



j 18 Thompson Street 



Tel. WI 6-1077 



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FLOWERS j 

A Full Line of Cut Flowers and Plants 



Winchester 
Cleaning Service 



MIKE PENTA, Proprietor 



Winchester fi-0513-J 



Homes - Offices - Stores 

WE ( LEAN 

Windows, walls, floors, Venetian blinds, rugs, cellars, and at- 
tics. Windows repaired, glass set; screen and storm window 
service. Gardens, lawns, etc., cared for. Rubbish removal. 
Floors shellaced and waxed. 



ELECTRIC WATER PUMP AT YOUR SERVICE 

FRANK REEG0 

- CONTRACTOR - 

Landscape Gardener and General Trucking. Asphalt Drive- 
ways, Roads. Equipped with 3-ton roller. Owned and Operated. 
GRADING — DRIVEWAYS — DRY WELLS 
LOAM, SAND. GRAVEL, CRUSHED STONE FOR SALE 

AU Men Insured 

Tel. Winchester 6-2412 or Winchester 6-0098- W 



FALL CLEANING 

FOR YOUR 

RUGS & CARPETS 



No time like the present to try our thorough cleaning 
service and give new spring to rug fibres — lustrous beauty 
anil years of extra life to precious floor coverings. Our 
cleaning is the result of years of experience with both Orien- 
tal and Domestic rugs — any wonder our customers enjoy 
using our service year after year. 




^J^oho (jSoodah 
14 Lochwan Street 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



& So 



Winchester 6-2213 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, JANUARY 12. 1951 



3 




WINCHESTER KEEPS ON 
WINNING 



WINCHESTER OVERWHELMED 
CONCORD 



Melrose. 56 - 36 Victim Last Friday 



Ourden Victory Gave Indians First 
Place in Middlesex League 



WINCHESTER BATTLES 
BELMONT TO RETAIN LEAGUE 
LEAD 



N 1 USING HOME 



One of the largest nursing homes 
in Massachusetts, The Orland 
House, will open on January 15th, 
at 342 Forest street, Maiden. Ac- 
commodating about 06 patient- foi 
the complete nursing care of 
chronic and semi-chronic disease*, 
elderly and convalescent patient.-, 
it was originally known as the Mai- 
den Contagious Hospital. 

During the last war it served as 
headquarters for an anti-aircraft 
unit. Recently it was known as the 



Billotte Hospital. 

Completely redecorated and re- 
equipped to meet all requirements 
of the State Department of Public 
Health, the Orland House com- 
prises a main building of three 
stories, a west win*? with pavilion, 
and east wing with pavilion and ad- 
joining annex. 

There will be ample available ac- 
commodations in private, semi- 
private and ward rooms. The nurs- 
ing home is equipped for the most 
up-to-date sanitary bath rooms and 
toilet facilities for ambulatory pa. 
tients. 



ALBREE COMMISSIONED 



The Department of the Army- 
has announced that John A. Albree, 
of Winchester and Cambridge, has 
been selected for appointment as a 
Second Lieutenant in the Regular 
Army. Mr. Albree, son of Mr. 
George N. Albree, 7 Stratford road, 
and Mrs. Grace M. Albree, 10 
Chauncy street, Cambridge, is a 
Senior at Norwich University and 
a First Lieutenant in the Norwich 
Corps of Cadets. 

Mr. Albree served two years in 
the United States Marine Corps, 
being discharged with the grade of 
Sergeant. He was awarded the 
Presidential Unit Citation. He is 
majoring in English at Norwich 
University and is a member of 
Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. He 
is also co-captain of the Norwich 
cheerleaders and a member of the 
literary board for the Guidon, Uni- 
versity newspaper. He was de- 
signated as a "Distinguished Mili- 
tary Student" by the Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics for his 
impressive record i n military 
studies. 

Mr. Albree's choice of branch of 
service is Armor, in which branch 
his appointment is tendered. He will 
finish a four year ROTC course 
in Armor upon his graduation and 
is considered by his military in- 
structors to be "outstanding officer 
material." 

This interim appointment is sub- 
ject to confirmation by the Senate 
and the passing of the required 
physical examination. Effective 
date of appointment, if accepted by 
the student, will be 15 June 1951 
which will allow for a week of leave 



after graduation before reporting 
for duty. 

Mr. Albree was among forty- 

j two Norwich cadets who applied 
for Regular Army commissions, a 
privilege reserved for those de- 
signated as Distinguished Military 
Students. Of these forty-two, 

| twenty-four were chosen by the De- 
partment of the Army. Although 
only two branches of the service 
are represented in the Norwich 
ROTC program, Signal Corps and 
Armor, Regular Army appoint- 
ments were awarded in eight 
branches of the Army: Signal 
Corps, Armor, Military Police 
Corps, Ordnance Corps, Corps of 
Engineers. Finance Corps, Trans- 
portation Corps and the Quarter- 
master Corps. 



BOB AND RAY AT HIGH 
SCHOOL 



Bob and Ray, well-known radio 
performers on Station WHDH, ap- 
peared on the Winchester High 
School stage last Friday morning 
. in a series of skits from their radio 
show. 

Engaged for the Winchester ap- 
pearance by the staff of the high 

; school year-book, The Aberjona, 
Bob and Ray delighted their au- 
dience with imitations, reminiscen- 
ces, and impersonations. 

Bob Elliott needed no introduc- 
tion to the high school teachers who 
remembered him as a student not 
too long ago. In his school days 

| he was especially interested in 
radio and wrote scripts and pre. 
pared production details for many 
an intramural broadcast. 







1 TUXEDOS 






FOR HIRE 






For All 






Occasions 


PHILIP CHITEL 


MEN'S SHOP 


596 Main 


Street 



DilORIO GETS W( OP SALUTE 



John Dilorio, left forward on 
Winchester High's fast-stepping 
basketball team, will receive a ra- 
dio salute from sportscaster Len 
Masters and WCOP tomorrow on 
the High School Sports Parade at 
0:45 p. m. in recognition of his 
outstanding athletic ability in bas- 
ketball. 

Each week, Masters, the top 
sports reporter on high school 
athletics, salutes the ten best play- 
ers of the preceding week, naming 
them to the WCOP Sports Honor 
Roll. 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



The Winchester High hoopsters 
continued on the victory path by 
defeating Melrose High by a score 
of 5G - 36 at Melrose last Friday 
night. This was the sixth straight 
victory of the season for the Red 
and Black and their third in Mid- 
dlesex League competition. This 
marks the fifth time in six games 
that the locals have scored over 50 
points as they continued to control 
the ball well and shoot accurately, 
connecting on 39 per cent of their 
shots at the basket. 

Over the first half the locals 
played top notch basketball as they 
moved the ball well to score free- 
ly while limiting Melrose to four 
baskets from the floor. Winches- 
ter started fast to outscore Mel- 
rose 18 - 9 in the first period and 
IT - 0 in the second period to lead 
35 - 15 at the half. The second half 
was poorly played as Melrose up- 
set the Winchester attack with their 
aggressive and rough type of play. 
As a result Melrose lost four of 
four of their five regulars via the 
personal foul route in this second 
half. In spite of this Winchester 
was able to match Melrose point 
for point as the scoring in the sec- 
ond half was exactly even. 

Johnny Dilorio and Charlie 
Murphy played outstanding games 
for Winchester as Murphy pro- 
vided the spark in the first half 
drive and Dilorio held the locals to- 
gether with timely baskets during 
the rough second half. Rodney- 
Long, Doug Hawkins and Dilorio 
battled the rangy Melrose team off 
the backboards and did an excellent 
job of controlling the boards for 
Winchester. Once again it was very 
pleasing to Coach Bartlett to see 
the Winchester scoring so well dis- 
tributed as all ten local performers 
entered the scoring column. 

The Winchester Seconds con- 
tinued to provide local fans with 
great hopes for the future as they 
won their sixth straight game by 
defeating the Melrose Seconds by 
a score of 52 - 40. Norman Howard 
with 13 points and John Atkinson 
with 12 points were the high scor- 
ers for Winchester. 

The summary: 

Winchester High 



Dilorio. If 
Coon, If 
SymmcH, rf 
Forester, rf 
I.onif. c 
Dnnlon, c 
Murphy. Ig 
Cirurso, ]g 
Hawkins, re 
Farrell, rg 



Wincheste) High won its seventh 
straight victory of the season by 
overwhelming Concord High 54 - 
16 at the Boston Arena on Tuesday 
afternoon. The Red and Black had 
an easy time with their opposition 
and Coach Bartlett vyas able to 
give his reserves considerable play- 
ing time which will help in future 
close contests. 

Winchester had a slight attack 
of Arena jitters in the first half 
and were not scoring in their cus- 
toriiary rapid fashion. Concord was 
considerably worse off in this re- 
spect and were unable to make a 
basket until the third quarter. Win- 
cheater went ahead 1 1 - 0 at the 
end of the first period and was lead- 
ing lit - 1 at the half. John Dilorio 
and Rodney Lmg were' the only ef- ' 
feetive local scorers during this 
stretch. The whole team loosened 
up in the second half and with John 
Farrell and Stowell Symmes pae- 
! ing the attack moved ahead 33 - 10 
: at the end of the third period and 
j then coasted to an easy victory. 

Game captain Johnny Farrell and 
! Stowell Symmes played outstand- 
j ing ball for Winchester. Both 
played excellent all-around games 
! as well as scoring heavily, with 
Symmes collecting 13 points and 
Farrell 10 points. The Red and 
I Black continued to shoot accurate- 
ly as they made good on 33 per cent 
| of their shots which is good shoot- 
j ing on a strange floor. 
The summary: 

Winche«ler High 



Totn a 



Seaman*. If 
Hnrnhiim, If 
Bonn, if 
Skelley, rf 
Whitney, e 
Siefral, o 
MrMulley. lg 
Flynn. lg 
Demiirts. rg 
Donnghy, rg 

Totnls 

Refer* 



Melrose High 



e 


f 


pts. 


ti 


2 


14 


0 


T 


1 


:i 


i 


7 


0 


5 


s 


:t 


1 




0 


1 


1 


:i 


4 


10 


0 


1 


l 


:i 


2 


8 


1 


II 


2 


19 


18 


5« 


8 


f 


pts. 




0 


6 


0 


0 


0 




2 


0 


0 


2 


2 


3 


5 


11 


0 


0 


0 


l 


1 


8 


0 


(1 


0 


H 


2 


K 


0 


i) 


0 


12 


12 


36 



Dilorio, If 


t 


f 


pts. 


5 


0 


10 


Coon, If 


1 


I 


:l 


Symmes. rf 


6 


1 


18 


Forester, if 


0 




1 


Hawkins, v 




1 


5 


Donlon. c 


o 


0 


0 


Knrrell. Ig 


5 


0 


10 


Long, Ig 


4 


II 


8 


Cit mso, ig 


1 


II 


■> 


Murphy, rg 


1 


II 


2 


Totnls 


25 


4 


.14 


Concord 


High 




Olsen. If 


g 


f 


ptK. 


4 


2 


10 


Ca dwell. If 


0 


0 


0 


Cotighlin, rf 


0 


0 


0 


Mills, rf 


1 


U 


2 


Kitian, c 


1 


0 


2 


Arthur, c 


0 


0 


0 


Sweeney. Ig 


0 


0 


0 


Atwootl, ]g 


0 


0 


0 


Tuttle, rg 


l 


0 


2 


eletcher, rg 


0 


0 


n 


Totals 




2 


16 


lieferees. Segadelli 


and O'Ncil 







WINCHESTER FRESHMEN WON 
OPENER 



LOCAL SERVICE 

r 



LOCAL SERVICE 



TELEVISION 

S INSTALLATION 
1 SERVICE 
m SALES 

5 LOCAL SERVICE IS BETTER 

P Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 

| WINCHESTER APPLIANCE CO. 

£ 15 Thompson Street Winchester 6-2990 



y 
> 

ui 

in 

_i 
< 

u 

3 

UJ 

U 
> 

UJ 

(T) 

-I 
< 

3 



LOCAL SERVICE 



LOCAL SERVICE 



Charter No. 11.103. Reserve Diatrict No. 1 
Report of condition of 

Winchester National 

/ BANK — 

/ Wl NCHESTER .MASSACHUSETTS 

of Winchester, in the State of Massachusetts at the cloae of business on 

DECEMBER 29. 1950 

Published in response to call made by Comptroller of the Currency, under 
Section 5211. I nited States Revised Statutes 
Assets 

Cash, ba ancts with ether bunks, including reserve balance, and cash 

items in process of collection $ 728. 310. S2 

I'niusd States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed . 1,795,412.50 

1'iirtHvrate stocks (Including 16,000.00 stock of Federal Reserve bank i K.000.00 

U«ni> and discounts mending *4 HP.lt overdraft*! 1.278.661. 6C 

Furniture and fixtures HS.391.5H 48.3iJl.5S 

Investments and other assets indirectly representing bank premises or 

other real estate 38.634.00 

Other assets 1,032.05 

Total Assets I5.896.442.63 

Liabilities 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations $1 .807. 6i 6.04 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations 1,278.201.53 

Deposits of United States Government i including postal savings' 60.220.4! 

Deposits of States and political subdivisions 311,267.80 

Deposits of banks 75.483.75 

Other deposits (certified and cashier's checks, etc. i 62.937.09 

Total Deposits 13,595.716.62 

Other liabilities 38.617.43 

Total Liabilities $3,634,334.05 

(spital Accounts 

Capita) Stock : 

Common stock total par $100, 000.00 $ 100.000 ,1 0 

Surplus 100.000.00 

Undivided profit.- 62.lfg.58 

Total Capital Accounts 262.108.58 

Total Liabilities and Capital Accounts $3,896,442.63 

Memoranda 

Assets pledged or assigned to secure liabilities and for other purposes $ 350.000.00 

State of Massachusetts County of Middlesex, ss. 

1. A V Korsberg. Cashier of the above-named bank, do solemnly 
swear that the above statement is true to the best of my knowledge 
and belief 

A K Korsberg. Cashier 
Sworn to and subscribed before Correct— Attest : 

me this 5th day of January. 1951. 
I\ PRICE WILSON. Frunkiin J Lane 

Notary Public Frank Y. Crawford 

My commission expires September 26. 1952 Leslie J. Scott 

Directors 



Thomas and Stillman 1 

AMERICAN LEGION 
AUXILIARY 

There will he a Special Meeting 
of all the members of the Auxiliary 
on Monday night, January 15 at the 
Legion Home. Please make an ef- 
fort to he present as there are some 
very important issues to he voted 
on as soon as possible. 

Remember the date - Saturday 
night, January 27, at 8 o'clock. 

There will he a very interesting 
party at the Legion Home. 

An old-fashioned "Box Social" 
where the Ladies furnish the re- 
freshments and the gentlemen have 
an opportunity to hid on each sur- 
prise package. The lucky winner 
then has the privilege of eating this 
delectable supper with the charm- 
ing chef who has extended all her 
culinary efforts to produce the 
masterpiece. An added attraction 
is the entertainment and dancing 
which follows and it promises to be 
very exciting and plenty of fun. 
The plans are all in the hands of a 
very capable committee. Ruby Mc- 
Kee, Lola Rennett and Barbara 
Murphy, so do not miss it. 



The Winchester Freshmen opened 
their season in impressive fashion 
by pinning a 48 - 27 defeat on the 
Stoneham Freshmen at the high 
school gym last Friday afternoon. 
Dave Pratt took up from where he 
left off last year by scoring 20 
points to lead his team to an easy 
victory. "Moose" Bellino and A! 
Lindsey teamed up well in the back 
court and the speed and showman- 
ship of this small pair was a real 
crowd-plcaser. 

In a preliminary game the Win- 
chester Junior High quintet was 
roundly drubbed 37 - 17 by their 
Stoneham opponents. This marked 
the first loss for the Junior High 
team in three years of competition 
as this years' outfit looked far in- 
ferior to its two predecessors. 

The summary: 

Winchester Freshmen 



Winchester High meets its big- 
gest test Of the season when it en- 
tertains Belmont High tonight be- 
fore a capacity crowd at the high 
school gym. Belmont is the de- 
fending champion of the Middlesex 
League, a perennial power in 
schoolboy basketball, and can be de- 
pended upon to defend their three- 
year reign a s champions to a 
lighting finish. The visitors are 
smarting from an unexpected upset 
handed to them by Stoneham on 
Tuesday which will make them that 
much tougher to beat. 

The locals have been the sur- 
prise package of the Middlesex 
League this season and a victory to- 
night will put them in a strong 
position for the bitter last half of 
the league schedule. Coach Bart- 
let has done a magnificent job 
with a young and inexperienced 
team and firmly believes that his , 
boys can stand up under the pres- 
sure. The boys themselves have 
done a magnificent job out there on 
the court and make an interesting 
team to watch because of their 
ability to score heavily. The best 
feature of this team is its all- 
around balance as no one boy is 
outstanding and the scoring is "well 
divided among the seven regulars. 
Winchester finished strongly last 
year by defeating Belmont at Bel- 
mont a year ago and figures that 
its chances are good of repeating 
tonight. 

League Standing 

Winchester 
Belmont 
Melrose 
Wakefield 
Lexington 
Reading 
Stoneham 
Concord 



4 

3 

o 
•> 
o 
2 

! 
(i 



OUR FIXTURES ARE 
NOT BEAUTIFUL 



BUT 

OUR MERCHANDISE 
USUAL NOTHING 
THE BEST 



IS AS 
BUT 



\\ <• arc temporarily located .it .">')() Main Street pending 
our moving hack to our former location .it <> Mt. Vernon 
Street Hut it's still tin- -anu- good service good mer- 
chandise - the >ame polir\ of oerving you in the best way 
we possibly can. 

PHILIP CHITEL MENS SHOP 

I ACK CHITEL Tel. Inchesler h-OTM-W 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



HOLY 



NAME TO 
JESUIT 



HEAR 



WINTON (LIB 

The Winton Club held its Jan- 
uary meeting at the home of Mrs. 
FVank C. d'Elseaux on Monday. A 
very enthusiastic and interested 
audience listened to the report of 
the Cabaret chairman. Mrs. Charles 
W. Butler, on the progress of the 
Cabaret which is to he held in the 
Town Hall on January 25, 26, 27. 

Mrs. Butler then introduced the 
new director, Mr. Richard R. 
Rector, who represents the Charles 
H. Blake Productions. His pleas- 
ing personality and vivaciousness 
in presenting the forthcoming 
cabaret was rewarding. He told 
the members that the show this 
year was to be a fast night club 
musical review with peppy numbers 
dating back to the 20's, such as the 
Black Bottom, and the Charleston, 
up to the present time of the jitter- 
bug. There will be the ever pop- 
uar Winton Club drill as well as 
the old time favorite, the Waltz. 
There will be an especially funny 





I 


f 


pts. 


Ftiardan, If 


2 


1 


5 


Becker, if 


1) 


I) 


0 


Mrllonouch, if 


(I 


II 


n 


Dilorio. rf 


1 


1 


3 


I'ratt, c 


s 


4 


■ 20 


O'Brien, <• 


1 


II 


2 


IVrkins, ljr 


:t 


0 


6 


tiinqWy, Ig 


I 


0 


9 


Bellino, r« 


4 


0 


H 


McKinley, rg 


1 


tl 


■j 


Butler, ik 


0 


0 


0 


totals 


21 


6 


4K 


Stnneham 


Freshmen 






Steele. If 


K 


f 


pts. 


4 


2 


10 


J. Dixon, rf 


A 


II 


6 


It. Dixon, if 


1 


0 


2 


Woodbury, c 


2 


II 


4 


Woods, . 


(i 


1 


I 


Boyle, Ik 


0 


1 




(iriffin, Ik 


II 


1 


1 


Fleisher, rfr 


n 


1 


1 


Walah, i k 


0 


1 


1 


Totals 


JO 


7 


27 



On Sunday, January 14, the Holy 
Name Society of St. Mary's Church 
will attend the 8:00 o'clock Mass 
and Communion and will then ad- 
journ to the Knights of Columbus; 
Hall for the breakfast and a meet- 
ing, at which the speaker will be 
Rev. John Calvin, S. J., who has 
chosen for his subject, "Whom Do 
You Know?" 

Father Calvin is assistant treas- 
urer and auditor of the New F.ng- 
land Province of the Jesuit Order 
and was ordained in 1941. He 
holds a Master's Degree from St. 

Louis University and has studied number, the hula, featuring on all 
at Shadowbrook in Lenox, at Wes- | men cast. 

ton College, and is an alumnus of All the music will be entirely 
the Harvard Business School. original and Mr. Rector stressed the 

Program Chairman William J. fact that all of the show will be 
Croughwell expects an overflow j brand new in every respect. The 
meeting, the Society having had costumes are especially intriguing 
three laymen as speakers this sea- and very colorful, 
son, making it certain that Father Mrs. Frank C. d'Elseaux is in 
Calvin will be particularly well re. charge of the table tickets for both 
eeived. 'nights, although Saturday night 

It is interesting to note that already is sold out. Mrs. Herbert 
the guest speaker for the "Family T. Wadsworrb is in charge of tick- 
Communion Breakfast", slated for ets for the balcony for both nights. 
February 11, is none other than and also for Thursday, Theatre 
"Jim Megan", catcher for the Night, which is a complete show. 
Cleveland Indians. This affair will j Rehearsals started Wednesdav 
be held at Winchester Town Hall night and will be in full swing next 

week in Waterfield Hall, after 
which they will go into their final 
week at the Town Hall. 



and it would be wise for all mem- 
bers planning to attend with their 
wives, sweethearts, daughters, 
sons, nephews, nieces, etc., to pro- 
cure their reservations in advance 
since the Mall is limited in seating 
capacity. 

GOOD GOVERNMENT DAY AT 
WINCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 



WYMAN SCHOOL NEWS 





SERIES y 
OIL BURNER 

$297.oo 

COMPLETELY INSTALLED 

We remove and 
credit your coal 

Phone WOburn 2-0800 
CUMMINGS & CHUTE INC. 

Established 1*S6 
i Hixh Street Woburn 



Referee, Silvg 

W. H. S. PRESENT "DEATH 
TAKES A HOLIDAY" 

"Death Takes a Holiday", which 
experienced a great deal of success 
in New York City in 1929, will be 
presented by the senior and junior 
chisses of Winchester High School 
on Saturday evening February 17, 
at 8:15 in the High School audito- 
rium. The highly dramatic play- 
was originally written by Alberto 
Casella and wa% re-written for the 
American stage by Walter Ferris. 

The cast chosen by Mr. Thomas 
Morse, Speech Teacher and Dra- 
matic Coach at Winchester High 
School, is as follows: 
Cora Dorothy Parker* 

Fedele Harold Quigley 

Duke Lambert Jost Micheisen 
Alda Sheila Gray 

Duchess Stephanie 

Carolyn Buracker 
Princess of San Luca Sona Norian 
Baron Cesarea John Borden* 

Rhoda Fenton Marjorie Dexter 
Eric Fenton Ronald MacKenzie 
Corrado Richard Rush 

Grazia Dorothy Brandt 

His Serene Highness. Prince 

Sirki, of Yitalba Alexandri 

Karl Carrier 
Major Whitread David Archibald* 

♦National Thespian — Troupe 
729. 



Students of Winchester High 
School are voting today. Good Gov- 
ernment Day, to elect a delegate to 
represent them on Beacon Hill 
later in the year when students 
from all over the Commonwealth 
will preside over the executive and 
legislative branches of the govern- 
ment. 

From the list of delegates elected 
in the various schools will b e 
chosen a governor, lieutenant gov- 
ernor, councillors, senators, and 
representatives. 

Besides the election, appropriate 
recognition of the day will be taken 
by social studies classes. The 
teaching of state government is 
not the affair of a single day, but 
rather a long-term period of study, 
one of the highlights being the an- 
nual Good Government Day. 

Candidates are David Archibald, 
Paul Boyle, Robert McLaughlin, 
and Robert Mirak. 



C. A. P. 



NEWS MEDFORD 
FLIGHT 



Harry "Lally" Myers, former 
Winchester football and track star, 
was among those recently awarded 
freshman football numerals at Mid- 
dlebury College. He was regular 
back on this year's yearling team. 



"What is the C. A. P." is the 
question that is asked by many. 

i The C. A. P., Civil Air Patrol, is a 

i civilian auxiliary of the United 
States Air Force. The job of the 

j C. A. P. is to promote civil aviation 
in peacetime and in wartime to as- 

i sist the Air Force in patroling the 
coast for submarines and enemy- 
craft. In peace and war the C. A. 
P. aids in air-sea rescue of crashed 
planes and other types of disasters. 

The C. A. P. trains Cadets in pre- 
flight training for future careers 
in the Air Force or in Civil Avia- 
tion. A Cadet who has completed 
3 years of training and had two 
summer encampments can enter the 
Air Force as a private first class 
after passing an Air Force Profi- 
ciency Examination. 

Any person interested in joining 
the Civil Air Patrol should get in 
touch with Second Lieutenant 
Henry A. Dellicker, telephone num- 
ber — - WI 6-0495. Minimum age is 
15 years. 



Mrs. William Mitchell showed 
moving pictures to the children of 
Miss Batchelder's fourth grade, of 
her trip to Mexico, which added 
greatly to the interest in their 
study of Mexico. An interesting 
exhibit is on display in the class 
FOOm, made possible by the children 
bringing Mexican objects from 
home. 

The children at Wyman were 
very busy previous to Christmas 
making articles for the Junior Red 
Cross. They completed: - 50 Christ* 
mas place cards. i!2 nut Clips and 
stilted nuts, 25 Christmas greeting 
cards, 41; napkin holders. 33 scrap 
books. IX tray favors, 26 candy 
baskets. 4 large stockings filled 
with toys. 24 jointed paper teddy 
bears, 35 pipe and yarn dolls. 12 
joke books, 20 containers of home 
made cookies. 20 yarn thills and one 
afghan. 

Some of the places to which these 
articles were sent are: - Bedford 
Veterans' Hospital, Murphy Gener- 
al Hospital. Cushing General Hos- 
pital, Home For Little Wanderers, 
Winchester Hospital, Children's 
Hospital, Peabody Home For Crip- 
pled Children and Home For Aged 
in Winchester. 

We are happy to welcome Mrs. K 
Riegert. t h e new fourth grade 
teacher, to Wyman School. 

FOR M ER RESI DENT VISITING 
TOWN 

Miss Dorothy Prescott Allen has 
been vacationing with her sister. 
Mrs. William A. Frizzell at 64 
Church street. 

Miss Allen left Winchester to 
accept an administrative appoint- 
ment at Columbia University, New 



DONAGHEY — GALES 

There is Winchester interest in 
the wedding which took place on 
Saturday evening, December 30, at 
the Medford Hillside Methodist 
Church, when Miss Marjorie Es- 
ther Oules, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward C. Gales of Medford, 
became the bride of Cpl. Kenneth 
Allan Donaghey, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence S Donaghey of 
Olenwood avenue. 

White flowers and candelabra 
decorated the altar for the double- 
ring candlelight ceremony, which 
was performed at 7 o'clock by the 
Pastor, Rev. Miller C. Lovett." The 
bridal music was played by Miss 
Doris Watson, the church organist, 
and the soloist, Mr. Paul Chinchillo 
of Medford, sang "Oh Promise Me" 
and "Perfect Love". 

Miss Gale was given in mar- 
riage by her father. Her wedding 
gown of white satin was styled 
with a sweetheart neckline, fitted 
bodice and full skirt extending into 
a long train. Her fingertip length 
veil fell from a headpiece of tiny 
seed pearls and she carried a bou. 
quet of white chrysanthemums 
combined with ivy. 

Mrs. Doris Erickson of Medford 
was her sister's matron of honor 
and the bridesmaids were Miss June 
Strong and Miss Gloria Mander, 
both of Medford. All of the at-, 
tendants wore identical gowns of' 
white satin brocade, styled with 
oval necklines, fitted bodices and 
full skirts. They carried arm bou- 
quets of poinsettias, tied with white 
satin ribbon, and wore long red 
velvet gloves and close fitting hats 
to match, 

Herman E, Erickson of Medford 
was best man for Cpl. Donaghey 
and the usher corps comprised 
William Campbell, Howard Sterns 
and Edward Johnston, all of Med 
ford. 

A reception was held in the 
church vestry immediately after 

the ceremony, the bride and bride- 
groom being assisted in receiving 
by their parents, the matron of 
honor and the bridesmaids. Deco- 
rations for the reception were 
white chrysanthemums and poin- 
settias. 

Miss Nancy Donaghey, sister of 
the bridegroom, had charge of the 
guest book and she wore a red silk 
tatfeta dress, silver slippers, white 
corsage and a band of white flowers 
fur a head piece. 

Mrs. Gales chose a peacock blue 
taffeta gown with light grey acces- 
sories I'm her daughter's wedding. 
Mi-. Donaghey. the bridegroom's 
mother was gowned in powder-blue 
crepe with blue and silver accesso- 
ries. Both mothers wore corsages 
of tiny white chrysanthemums. 

After a honeymoon, Cpl, Donag. 
hey will return to Camp Lejeune, 
N. C. He graduated from Win- 
chester High School and from 
Wentwoi th Institute in June, 
1950. During World War II Cpl. 
Donaghey served with the Marine 
Corps in Cuam and China. 

His bride was graduated from 
Medford High School and is now 
attending Boston University. 



MacDORM AND 



HORN 



Miss Sally Margaret Horn, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gordo II. 
Horn of Wendell street, and Rob- 
ert Clarence MacDormand, son of 
Mr. and Mrs, Clarence MacDor- 
mand of Peach Orchard road. Burl- 
ington, were married on Sunday 
afternoon, December 31, at the 
«'hurch of the Epiphany. The rec- 
tor. Rev. Dwight W. Hadley, read 
York City two years ago. During tbe service at 3 o'clock and a recep- 



this time she attended the Art Stu- 
dents' League and studied oil paint- 
ing privately with Professor Alton 
S. Tobey. 

Miss Allen plans to return to 
Winchester permanently on Feb- 
ruary first and will devote her time 
to oil painting, specializing in por- 
traits, 



YOUR HELP ASKED 



PUBLIC SCHOOL 
ATTENDANCE FIGURES FOR THE MONTH OF DECEMBER. 1 950 



Morgan Memorial is now asking 
its contributions to help them meet 
an emergency that exists for many 
of the poor people it tries to serve. 
They desperately need warm cloth- 
ing and shoes, especially for chil- 
dern. The reconditioning and re- 
pair of these garments gives other 

handicapped people self-respecting avenue, and Mrs. John j" Dolan" 



tion followed at the home of the 
bride's parents. 

Given in marriage by her fath- 
er, the bride wore a street length 
dress of white sheer wool trimmed 
with gold. Her hat was white, 
matching her dress and she wore a 
corsage of white roses. 

Mrs, Virginia Wheaton of Wil- 
mington was her sister's only at- 
tendant. She wore a brown sheer 
wool dress with a hat of brown and 
gold and a corsage of yellow roses. 
Erling Olsen of Burlington was 
best man for Mr. MacDormand. 

Following their wedding jour- 
ney Mr. and Mrs. MacDormand art- 
making their home in Winchester. 

Miss Mary McAuley, 2 Elmwood 



School 

High School 
Junior High School 
Lincoln School 
Mystic School 
Noonan School 
Parkhurst School 
Washington School 
Wyman School 



Mem- 
ber 

ship 

744 

365 
232 
325 
207 
180 
24* 
375 



. <7c of 
atten- 
dance 

94.00 
94.07 
92.93 
90.50 
94.87 
88.80 
93.71 
89.89 



Atten- 
dance 
Rank 

3 
o 

5 
6 
1 
8 
4 
7 



2676 



Tardi- 
ness 
Cases 

281 
105 

22 

16 

19 

34 
8 

28 

513 



7c of 
Tardi- 
ness 

37.77 
34.76 
9.48 
4.92 
9.17 
1X.88 
3 22 
7^47 



work and wages and the clothing 
Tardi- will be a godsend for families that 
ness cannot afford today's prices. If you 
Rank have some clothing, please call Mor- 
gan Memorial at HAncock 6-9670 
for a truck to call and pick up your 
appreciated donation. 



8 
7 
5 
2 
4 
6 
1 
3 



341 Washington street, returned 
recently by plane from Clearwater 
Beach, Florida, where they spent 
a ten day day vacation visiting with 
Miss McAuley's father, William P. 
McAuley. a former resident of this 
town. 




/V^MARCH or DIMES 

™ JANUARY 11-11 



4 



The Winchester Star 

< Established 1*80) 
STAR Bl'lLDING 
3 cm R< || STREET 
WINCHESTER, MASS. 
Theodore I'. Wilson 
Editor and Publisher 
PublUhed Every Friday 



SINGLE COPIES, TEN < ENTS 
Left at Your Residence for 1 Year 
The Winchester Star. $2.50 in 
Advance, 

\e»s Item*, Lodge Meetintts, So- 
ciety Events, Personals, etc, sent 
to this office «i|| be welcomed b> 
the lid it or. 



for good schools. To date they stand 
in opposition to the School Build- 
ing Committee, School Committee, 
Selectmen, Planning Board, Fi. 
nance Committee and nearly all of 
the limited town meeting members 
who accepted the "Alternate Plan" 
"f the School Building Committee 
on November 30. They must have 
some, or shall we say should have, 
some very good reason for such op- 
position. Isn't it time for them to 
tell what it is? 



STATEMENT FROM 
111 II. DISC ( OMMITTEE 



M; 



at Win 'Neuter 



The Winchester Star assumes no 
financial responsibility tor typo- 
graphical errors in advertisements 
but will puhli>h without charge a 
correction in the next issue, or re- 
publish that portion of the adver- 
tisement which is incorrect. 

Telephone Winchester 6-0029 



Only Newspaper 
Printed In Winchester 

Serving the Community for 
70 Years 

Largest Sworn Circulation 



Representina Winchester j 

I 
I 



Senators in Congress 

Leverett Saltonstall | 

Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. j 

Congressman, ">th District | 

Edith Xotnse Rogers j 

Senator fith Middlesex | 

District | 

Harris S. Richardson ^ 

Representative in General > 
\ oiirt 

Harrison Chadwick I 

County Commissioner 

James A. Ctillen ' 
s t 



Way back in the days of World 
War 1 there was a sons that went 
"Where do we go from here, boys, 
where do we go from here!" If 
those who attended Tuesday own 
ing's school hearing had taken up 
this refrain at the close of the ses- 
sion in the town hall, the words 
would have been very apropos. 
Where do we go from here. If any- 
one thought anything productive 
would come from Tuesday's meet- 
ing, he was surely doomed to dis- 
appointment. The opponents to the 
school plan refused to say in what 
way, or ways, the plan does not 
meet with their approval, or what 
can be done to the plan to make it 
satisfactory to them. In fact, aside 
from a brief statement from the 
so called "Referendum Committee, *' 
nothing was heard from opponents 
of the school plan at all. The "Ref- 
erendum Committee," on its own 
statement, believes that the town 
has rejected the School Building 
Committee's "Alternate Plan," in- 
volving the enlarging of the junior 
high school to be used its a four- 
year senior high school and the re 
modeling of the present senior 
high to house a two-year junior 
high school tit a cost of about 
$l.»>00,000. They have also stated 
they can see no reason for further 
discussion of tins plan. What do 
they want, and why didn't they tell 
the hearing? That is what it was 
called for! The School Building 
Committee hoped to learn just 
what the real objections to their 
plan are, and it' possible to revise 
the plan so as to satisfy at least 
a majority of the objectors. Of 
course, if the entire plan is objec- 
tionable, that is one thing. If the 
opponents do not intend to cooper- 
ate with the Building Committee, 
that is another. One is, no matter 
how regretfully, drawn to the latter 
supposition, at least on what hap- 
pened at Tuesday's hearing, though 
the opponents did not say at that 
time they ate opposed to the Com- 
mittee. They did not say anything, 
except for the brief statement of 
tlu- "Referendum Committee," the 
members of which probably do not 
represent all those opposed to the 
school plan undei discussion. The 
Star believes the tint" has come for 
those who oppose the school plan 
to speak up. We are going to have 
another special town meeting on 
January 2s». tit which, unless oppon- 
ents tell what they want in a re- 
vised plan, we are going to have 
the same "Alternate Plan" pres- 
ented for consideration. Presum- 
ably the plan, in view of the over- 
whelming majorities in its favor 
at the meeting when it was ac- 
cepted, will again be passed by the 
same precinct delegates who ap- 
proved it before, Again, just as 
presumably, the opponents will in- 
voke another referendum, aftet 
which there will Ik' a dog fight, 
with school proponents trying to 
get out enough more votes to en- 
sure a two-thirds majority this 
time ami opponents attempting to 
influence enough people to keep 
their minority vote high enough 
to block the necessary two-thirds 
vote. And if they succeed, then 
what! We repeat, let's heat from 
the School opponents. If they 
sincerely want to give our school 
children in the secondary grades 
adequate school facilities, as some 
of them at least have professed, 
and they really believe the plan put 
forward by the School Building 
Committee, aftet mote than a year 
of study, is not what we should 
have, then it would seem the bur- 
den of proof is with, them. If they 
continue to remain silent, and re- 
fuse to tell what they do want, 
they can not blame people for 
coming to think they want only 
to defeat any sort of school build- 
ing project. There are. of course, 
some in town, because of the in- 
creased tax load, who want to do 
just that, but the "Referendum 
Group," on Captain Rush's state- 
ment are not of this mind. They 
have openly professed their desire 



Kditoi of the Stai : 

The undersigned Committee will 
very much appreciate the oppor- 
tunity to present in your paper a 
brief statement of their position 
With respect to the forthcoming 
special town meeting to consider 
further the problem of housing the 
j Town's Secondary School popula. 
t ion. 

The petition foi the calling of 
this meeting was not instigated or 
inspired in any way by the Building 
( ommittee. We do not mean to 
imply by this that we are in any 
sense opposed to the holding of 
such meeting; the point is that the 
petition represents a spontaneous 
1 movement on the part of a large 
number of the citizen.-, of the Town. 
The number of signatures on the 
petition, together with the substan. 
tial majority of votes which were 
cast on the recent referendum in 
' favor of the proposed schools, 
' causes us to be confident that a 
large number of the voters of the 
Town are strongly in favor of an 
immediate solution to the Second- 
aiy School facilities problem, It 
also leads us to the belief that there 
is not a great deal of strong senti- 
ment in the Town opposed to tak- 
ing action of any kind at the pres- 
1 sent time. Under the circum- 
, stances it seems that it should he 
possible to present a solution at 
the forthcoming meeting which will 
meet with the approval of the 
necessary two-thirds of the voters. 

As we see it, it is our duty to 
make every possible effort to pre- 
sent such a proposal to the meet- 
ing. On this question, we are in 
agreement with tiie Editorial which 
: was in the Star last week. It was 
for just this purpose that we held 
our open meeting in the Town Hall 
I last Tuesday night, arranging foi 
the architects to be present to 
answer questions ami receive sug- 
gestions. It was our strong hope 
that there would be presented at 
this meeting specific suggestions 
w hich could be considered and per. 
haps incorporated in our plans. It 
must be admitted that the meeting, 
although well attended, was not 
very productive in this regard and 
the Building Committee received 
no inkling of what must be done to 
meet the objections of the Referen- 
dum Committee. 

Most of the criticism so far has 
been very vague. The Referendum 
Committee has been specific only in 
requesting more shop space and in 
suggesting that there be one heat- 
ing plant for the two buildings. 
Moth of these matters have receiv- 
ed the most careful consideration. 
; With reference to the shops, it is 
not the function of the Building 
Committee to formulate the educa- 
tional policies of the Town; that 
duty is delegated to the elected 
! School Committee together with 
the School Administration. We 
j have satisfied ourselves as a Build- 
ing Committee that the space pro- 
vided is sufficient to meet the pro- 
gram requested by these bodies, 
and at that point our function ends. 
It should he added however, that it 
is our belief that it will be prac- 
ticable to add additional shop space 
to the proposed Senior High School 
Building in the future if such a 
course should appear to be desir- 
able. 

With reference to the heating 
plan;, it is the considered conclu. 
si on of the architects and the heat- 
ing engineers who were consulted 
that two plants, one for each build- 
ing, will not be more expensive to 
install and maintain than one plant 
for both buildings. We do not see 
how we can do other than take the 
opinion of these experts who have 
been dealing With such problems 
for many years. 

x'one of the Building ( ommittee 
has a closed mind on the present 
plans. Certainly we should be 
seriously failing in our duty to the 
To.vn it this were the case." On the 
other hand, it is equally clear that 
we should not make changes in the 
present plans unless such changes 
result in Improved facilities oi 
-eem to be desired by a substantial 
number of citizens. We are anx- 
ious to receive suggestions look- 
ing toward this end. Time is get- 
ting short; changes to be incor- 
porated in the plans to be presented 
at the forthcoming special meeting 
must be made within the next few 
days. Accordingly, we repeat our 
earnest reques; that if anyone has 
specific changes to suggest, get in 
touch with us immediately. 

Respectfully submitted. 

High School and Enlarge.! 

Jr, High School Bldg. Comm. 

Howard R. Bartlett 

William DaVtes 

Robert J. Fletcher 

Charles H. Gallagher 

Ruth Higgins 

Charles E. Jeliison 

Leslie A. Tuckei 

Rachel T. Kimball. Chan man 



amicably and in good faith a pro- 
posal which would command the 
support of the whole town. This 
result could have been accomplish- 
ed in time for the Annual Town 
Meeting in March. 

■j. The precipitate and unwise 
action of the proponents in imme- 
diately petitioning for another 
Special lown Meeting in which to 
again force through the same pro- 
ject that had just been turned 
down by the voters not only alien- 
ates completely the desires for sen- 
sible compromise but flouts the 
will and the intelligence of those 
voters. Xo better proof that in- 
sensate pressure groups are at 
work could be had. 

1. The use of a public hearing on 
the defunct plans in an abortive 
attempt to breathe new life into a 
discredited project was based on 
poor judgment. To our knowledge 
the present Building < ommittee 
has never entertained, much less 
used, any constructive criticism 
from any source. The Referendum 
Committee declined at that hear- 
ing to be drawn into discussion of 

plans already rejected by the town 

and will reserve its discussion for 
the Special Town Meeting. 

5. The High School and En- 
larged Junior High School Build- 
ing Committee will best serve the 
interests of Winchester if it will 
use the Special Town Meeting as 
the opportunity to request and re- 
ceive its discharge. 

»'•. In the meantime, the Referen- 
dum Committee offers for the con- 
sideration of the Town Meeting 
Members the appointment at the 
Annual Town Meeting in March of 
a town-wide committee of citizens, 
preferably those with knowledge of 
building construction and its com- 
ponents. Our town is blessed with 
a wealth of such able citizens. We 
suggest that this committee study 

the plans already available from 
all sources and that it serve with- 
out funds. 

Richard M. Hush, Chairman 
Referendum Committee . 



MANDATE TO CITIZEN'S 

Editor of the Star: 

A group of citizens, interested in 
the school problems id' Winchester, 
held a meeting on December .'(1st to 
discuss what action they felt should 
be taken as a result of the refer- 
endum held December 2*th on the 
action of the Town Meeting of No- 
vember 30th. 

No member of the Building Com- 
mittee, School Committee, or any 
Town Board was present, as it was 
decided to have a completely inde- 
pendent viewpoint on the subject. 

It was decided that the March 
Town Meeting was not the time nor 
the place to discuss this matter and 
that it should again be the subject 
of a special Town Meeting. 

A petition to the Selectmen was 
drawn up, requesting that a speci- 
al Town Meeting he called to de- 
cide what further action shall be 
taken to solve our Junior and 
Senior High School facilities prob- 
lem. It was presented to the 
Selectmen on January 2nd and con- 
tained hundreds of names from all 
parts of the Town. 

Spontaneous activity on the part 
of our townsmen gained so much 
strength that I believe the follow- 
ing information to be helpful and 
timely. 

L The vote at the November 
30th Town Meeting w a s over- 
whelmingly in favor of the Junior 
and Senior High School develop- 
ment, as planned and presented by 
the appointed Building Committee. 

2. The vote at the polls on De- 
cember 28th, while failing by a 
scant margin to produce the neces- 
sary two-thirds vote to affirm the 
action of the Town Meeting mem- 
bers, did produce a great majority 
of votes in favor of their action 
earlier In November. 

3. In past weeks at open hear- 
ings and forums, everyone that 
w ishc 



into Boston and Greater Boston 
homes by the Boston press; from 
coast to coast by the Associated 
Puss; and the World Wide Broad- 
casting Foundation would carry the 
program not only to Belgium but to 
countless other countries. 

Watching and listening in the 
audience was Mr. James H. Keely, 
Jr., of the Dept. of State and 
resident of Winchester; Dr. Robert 
Stewart. Dean of the Fletcher 
School of Law and Diplomacy; 
Monsieur Jean Buckens a Belgian 
student of the school, and several 
other out-of-town guests who 
joined with our townspeople in 
braving the elements to take part 
in a program of peace and good 
will. 

We were extremely sorry that 
Count Ivan Dumonceau was 
grounded, but neither he nor the 
Committee could control the ele- 
ments. 

A lot of thought and a lot of love 
went into this program and the 
writer finds it difficult, so soon 
after the affair, to put into words 
tiie emotions of participants and 
audience - just "Thank you" for 
myself and Belgium. 

Sincerely yours, 

Gladys X. Toye. Chairman 
Winchester Hemroulle Friendship 
Committee 

REFERENDUM ( ( >M M ITT E E'S 
POSITION 

Kditor of the Star: 

At a meeting of the Referendum 
Committee held January 7, 1951, 
the Committee Chairman was dir- 
ected by unanimous vote to read 
the following statement at a public 
hearing January '.), 1951 at the 
Winchester Town Hall, on the 
merits of plans for the Junior- 
Se nior High School Building Pro- 
gram; 

"On December 28, 1950, the peo- 
ple of Winchester rejected, by their 
vote, the Bond Issue requested by 
the Junior-Senioi High School 
Building Committee for construc- 
tion of additions and renovations 
to the Secondary Schools as pro- 
vided in then Alternate Plan. 

The Referendum Committee is 
anxious to endorse a School Build- 
ing Program, which includes facil. 
lities for till children of the Town 
in an adequate and economical 
plant, but sees no point in further 
discussion of the Building Commit- 
tee's Alternate Plan, which has al- 
ready received extensive construc- 
tive criticism prim to the town vote 
and was deemed by the people of 
the Town, by their vote, to be un- 
satisfactory." 

Richard M. Rush, Chairman 
Referendum Committee 



^t^onalittc 
OPTOMETRIST 

NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 
13 CHURCH STREET 
WINCHESTER, MASS. 



Winchester 6-1021 



mat S-tl 



the fine Georgian architecture of 
the present Junioi High School 
building. 

Elizabeth M. Lobingier 
-1 Manchester road 



MRS. MARY CULLEN 



SCHOOL ADDITIONS SHOULD 
HARMONIZE WITH MAIN 
BUILDING 

Following is an open letter to the 
High School and Enlarged Junior 
High School Building (Ommittee. 
The writer, Mrs. Elizabeth M. 
Lobingier, is a professional artist 
and art feather of established re- 
putation. Ed, 



To the High School and Enlarged 
.1 unior 

High School Building Committee: 

Since your committee is in pro- 
cess of reconsidering the plans for 
enlarging the present Junior High 
School building, I should like to 
offer a suggestion. 

In both your Supplementary Re- 
port and your statement printed 
since the referendum you ask for 
constructive criticisms, and I am 
writing in response to these re- 
quests. 

I am disturbed about one point, 
namely, the proposed exterior of 
this building. At the meeting in 
the High School auditorium in No- 
vember one of your committee made 
the statement that the architects 
"purposely chose yellow brick and 
■d to do so had an opportunity a modern design" for the two addi- 



to express his personal views and turns to the dignified red brick 
feelings. Again, the record shows Georgian building, in order to make 
that all who did speak agreed that these wings appear different and as 
Winchester must have additional "additions," rather than as integral 

parts of the whole. 



classroom space. 

Obviously, the above record pro- 
duced a mandate to these citizens. 
They feel they would neglect their 
duties to the children of Winches- 
ter if they failed to provide the cri- 
tically needed additions. 

There have been some differences 
of opinion on details, but these 
should be easily reconciled. Noth- 
ing need be left undone. Our citi- 
zenry has risen to get what they 
need, what they want, and what the 
iaige majority have voted. 

Let us all get behind the School 
Building Committee, vote the ap- 
propriations as we did on Novem- 
er 30th. and no further referendum. 

Yours very truly, 
H. V. Farnsworth 
4 Central street 

A THANK YOU FROM 
THE HEART! 



Editi 
M; 
since 



REFER EN Dl M \ 
"NO CONFIDENCE" VOTE 



Kditor of the Stai : 

T it e Referendum Committee 
seeks a better solution of the 
secondary school problem, In ol- 
der that citizens of Winchester of 
like mind may understand oui 
present position, the following 
statements are made: 

1. The vote of tiie Town at the 
referendum of December 28, 1950 
rejected the proposed bond issues 
and the plans upon which the pro. 
ject was based. It was also, in 
effect, a vote of "no confidence" in 
the High School and Enlarged 
Junioi High School Building Com- 
mittee. 

2. Following that vote the Refer- 
endum Committee would gladly 
have sent its representatives to a 

meeting with the representatives 
of the proponents to work out 



i of the Star: 

y 1 take this opportunity to 
ely thank all those who helped 
in arranging the program for ac- 
ceptance o f the paintings from 
Hemroulle, Without the coopera- 
tion of the clergy and their rep- 
resentatives; the Steering Commit- 
tee; the School Committee, the 
Supt. of Schools, the Principal of 
the High School together with the 
teachers and students and janitors 
thereof; the Winchester Police 
Dept.; the church sextons: Henry 
Knowlton and Louis Goddu and the 
Winchester Star, the program 
could not have gone on. Personal 
letters of thanks to all involved are 
being sent out as fast as possible. 

t if all the programs I have evei 
presented here, or elsewhere, this 
one of January 
remain the m 
memory because I 
behind the story 
story ahead. As I 
horseshoe on the 
clergy, 
flanked 



7th will always 
t vivid in my 
know the story 
and sense the 
looked over the 
platform - the 



o u r guests of honor - 
mi one side by the Belgian 
representatives and the military. 

and on the other side by two mem- the committee's Supplementary Re 

port is in no sense a satisfactory 
answer to this problem. For 



This is certainly a mistake in 
judgment on the architect's part, 
and if such a plan should be re- 
tained I feel confident that the time 
will not be far off when the com- 
mittee will regret the decision, as 
will all citizens who have a concern 
for the beauty of our tow n. We now 
have a beautiful Georgian build- 
ing, and any addition to it should 
conform and harmonize in both 
color and design. The total effect 
should be one of complete unity. 
Any additions niust become in- 
tegral parts of the whole scheme, 
with the central building dominat- 
ing. 

There is no reason why this can- 
not be done! The problem of a 
pleasing exterior appearance should 
he just as important to the archi- 
tects as other problems they have 
to solve. Even if this should in- 
volve a little extra expense that 
would not be significant compared 
with the total expenditure which 
the town will make in this whole 
project. If we are spending so 
much money anyway, the building 
ought to look right." This is main- 
ly a matter of good design, har- 
monious color, fine proportions, and 
the determination to integrate the 
additions so that they become 
necessary part.s of the entire plan. 

The question becomes one o !' 
good taste. There is no excuse 
for violating this by mixing types 
of architecture. Why spoil ' the 
beautiful building we now have by 
adding w ings of another color which 
will stick out like sore thumbs? 
They will not be lovely in thorn- 
delves, and they will detiact from 
the central building because 
their inappropi iatetiess. The total 
effect will be a mixture of archi- 
tectural styles with emphasis upon 
the ugly wings because they so oh- 
viously will not belong where they 
a r e placed. They will forever 
seem to be an afterthought, care- 
lessly added. 

The attempt :n paragraph 8 of , 



Mrs. Mary Cullcn, wife of James 
Cullen, of 37 Sheridan Circle, and 
mother of Chairman James A. Cul- 
len of the Board of Middlesex- 
County Commissioners, died Mon- 
day afternoon, January 8. sud- 
denly, at the Winchester Hospital. 
She had undergone an operation at 
the hospital and had been recover- 
ing satisfactorily, her condition be- 
ing deemed sufficiently good to 
permit her return home Tuesday. 
An embolism caused her sudden 
passing: which came as a severe 
shock t o her family and many 
friends. 

Mis. Cullen was the daughter of 
Patrick, and Bridget (Cullen) 
Maguire. She was born Novem- 
ber 17. 1ST:*, in Glen Fame, County 
Leitrim, Ireland, coming to this 
country in 1898 as a girl of 11*. For 
a time while living in New York she 
was in the employ of Cornelius 
Vanderhilt and it was while in that 
city she was married more than 45 
, years ago. 

At the time of her marriage Mrs. 
Cullen and her husband moved to 
Boston and after two years in that 
city, they came t o Winchester, 
making their home here in the 
North End of the town ever since. 
For lit years the family home was 
on Clark street and for the past 
20 years, on Sheridan ( Tide, 

Aside from her home and family. 
Mrs, Cullen's principal interest was 
centered in her church. For 
years she was active in the work of 
St. .Mary's Parish, and she con- 
tinued her efforts in behalf of the 
Immaculate Conception Parish 
when upon the establishment of 
that paiish, her home fell within 
its boundaries. 

She was a member of the Im- 
maculate Conception Sodality and 
for many years served as chairman 
of the refreshment committee at 
the annual parish lawn parties. A 
highlight of her life in recent years 
was a visit to her home by Arch- 
bishop Richard J. dishing on 
Christmas, 1949, during which the 
Archbishop posed for a picture 
with the Cullens. 

A kindly person, with a great 
capacity for friendliness and ser- 
vice, Mrs. Cullen was held in high 
esteem by all who knew her. 

Surviving, besides her husband 
and son, James, are six daughters, 
Sister Serena. S. S. J., of St. Pius 
Convent, Lynn, and Sister Mary 
Romula, S. S. J., of St. Catherine's 
Convent, Somerville; Mrs. John W. 
O'Brien and Miss Florence L. Cul- 
len of Winchester, Mrs. John J. 
Hogan of Somerville and Mrs. 
Charles D. McCarthy of Medford; 
a son, William F. Cullen of Win- 
chester and 11 grandchildren. Also 
surviving are a brother and sister 
living in Glen Fame, County Lei- 
trim, Ireland, Theodore and' Ellen 
Maguire, and another sister, Mrs. 
Frank M. Burns of Arlington. A 
daughter. Mary Josephine, died in 
1912, and an uncle, the late Theo- 
dore Maguire, was a state senator 
and prominent in Colorado politics 
in the old days of the far west. 

The funeral was held Thursday ' 
morning from the late residence 
with solemn requiem high mass 
celebrated at the Immaculate Con- 
ception Church. 

Rev. Fr. Herbert K. A. Driscoll, 
pastor, was celebrant. Rev. Fr. 
Stephen E, Burke was deacon and 
Rev. Fr. Francis O'Neil of St. 
Mary's Church, subdeacon. 

Seated in the sanctuary were 
Rev. Fr. John P. O'Riordan* pastor 
of St. Mary's Church; Rev. Fr. John 
J. Me.Mahon. pastor of St. Cather- 
ine's, Somerville; Rev. Fr. Bernard 
S. O'Kane, pastor of St. Pius, 
Lynn; Rev. Fr. J. Joseph Kieree of 
St. Kevin's, Dorchester; and Rev. 
Fr. Gerard Brennan of St. Pius, 
Lynn. 

Among State and County officers 
attending the funeral were Mid- 
dlesex County Commissioners Wil- 




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of Suyirup 
a cm ? 



A low-cost bank 
atito loan can save 
you money. Get 
our figures first. 




2nd-CH0OSE 
A CAR 

3rd -FINANCE 
IT HERE 




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Winchester National 



BAN K 



WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

M KM B ER FCOCRAL OBPOSIT !N»URANCt CORPORATION 

Banking Hours S:00 A. M. to 2:00 P. M. Daily 
Wednesday and Saturday 8:00 A. M. to 12 Noon 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



THOMAS F. LYDON 

Thomas F. Lydon of 208 Cam- 
bridge road. Wohurn, a native of 
Winchester and a widely known 
farm and dairy produce dealer, 
• lied Friday. January 5, at the Win- 
chester Hospital after a brief ill- 
ness. He suffered a shock on the 
Tuesday preceding his death and 
was removed to the hospital at that 
time. 

Mr. Lydon had operated for some 
years a large produce and dairy 
farm at his home, serving both 
Wohurn and Winchester. Born in 
Winchester 43 years ago, he was 
the son of Michael and Bridget 
(Grady) Lydon. He was educated 
in the Winchester schools and at 
Winchester High School, from 
which he w a s graduated with 
honors, subsequently graduating 
from Harvard University with the 
Bachelor of Arts Degree in YX1W. 
He was a member of the Harvard 
Club of Boston. 

Mr. Lydon is survived by a sis- 
tor. ( apt. Josephine Lydon. I'SA, 
assigned to Fort Balhore Military 
District of Washington, I). ('., who 

went to the bedside of her brother 

as soon its news of his serious ill- 
ness reached her. 

The funeral was held from the 
late residence Monday morning 
with solemn requiem high mass 
celebrated at St. Charles Church, 
Wohurn. Interment was in Wild- 
wood < ometorv. 



SECOND CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 



Second Congregational Church 
is proud to report that its new 
parsonage will be completed and 
its minister moved in by January 
15. A public open house will be 
held on a date, to he announced 
later, at which time the people of 
Winchester will lie cordially invited 
to view the results that their 
generous support combined with 
the bard work of the members has 
accomplished. The foundation of 
the parsonage was laid the first 
week m June, 1950. Since that 
time the work has virt <lly all 
been done by the men of the p. ' ;h 
who have given their evening.. 
Saturdays and every spare moment 



of the leisure time 
a success at the 
cost. 

During this timt 
ing < 'ommittee ha; 
hard to keep funds 
builders. The 
and are only 



to make the job 
lowest possible 



SAMUEL A. OSBORNE 



liam G. Amli 
Thomas B. Brennan of 
Sheriff Howard Fitzpatric 
den, Register of Probate 



of ( 'amhridge and 
Medford. 
s of Mal- 
John J. 



Butler of Wakefield, Register of 
Deeds Albei t T. Gutheim of Arling- 
ton. Assistant Register of Deeds 
William Fitzgerald of Cambridge, 
County Engineer Howard S. Hatch 
of Waltham and Chief Probation 
Officer Joseph J. O'Brien of Milton. 
Among town and neighboring city 
dignitaries were Justice William 
G. Henchey of the Wohurn District 
Court and Postmaster Thomas J. 
Gilgun of Winchester. 

Rearers were Francis Burns of 
Arlington, nephew of Mrs. Cullen: 
and five cousins of the deceased. 
Frank Cullen of Wohurn. Fiank 
Keaney, Terrance Keatiey and 
L'tiies P. Cullen. all of Winchester; 
.md Joseph Armstrong of Maiden. 

Interment was in Calvary Ceme- 
tery where the committal prayers 
weie read by Father Driscoll. with 
responses by Father McMahon, 
Fathei < > Kane. Father Kierce and 
Father Brennan. 



Samuel A. Osborne, well known 
building contractor with headquar- 
ters at 7 Park street, died Tuesday 
night at the New Kngland Deacon- 
ni'-< Hospital, following a month's 
illness. 

Mr. Osborne made his home at 12 
Fairfield street in West Medford. 
having lived in West Medford for 
30 years. Son of Samuel, and Lois 
i Shaw i Osborne, he was born in 
HillsllOlo, N. R., September 1, 1X80. 
He had been in business in Win- 
chester for 20 years, was a member 
of the Royal Arcanum and attended 
the First Baptist Church in West 
Medford. He leaves his wife, the 
ra Steeves. 

services will be huld 
afternoon at the Ward 
une .m Maple street in 
2 o'clock. Rev. Edward 
pastor of the First 
ii in West Medford, 
will officiate. Interment will be in 
Puritan Lawn Cemetery, West Pea- 
body. 

JUNIOR FLORENCE 
CRITTENTON 



the Fund-Rais- 
worked equally 
available to the 
have raised $7,200 
$2,000 short in the 
objective of having the building 

and its partial furnishings com- 
pletely paid for when their minister 
moves into his new house. 

Though the people of Second 
Congregational Church parish are 
justly proud of their part in this 
accomplishment, they view it more 
as a tribute to the generous support 
of the people of Winchester and 
feel that it is only another proof 
of the fine community spirit that 
makes Winchester such a tine town 
in which to live. 

IN THE HOCKEY LIMELIGHT 



•i ; 



rormei 
Fun 
this Frida' 
Funeral H 
Maiden at 
P. Brink man 
Baptist Chui 



Two Winchester boys wore in the 
hockey spotlight at the Boston 
Garden Monday night. 'Wimpy" 
Burlnett, Boston College sopho- 
more, scored the clinching goal as 
the Eagles scored a great upset 
victory over Boston University, 
4 - 2. "Scotty" Doub, captain of the 
Tufts hockey team, scored four 
goals for what may be a college 
record, as the Jumbos turned back- 
American International from 
Springfield. Both "Wimpy" and 
"Scotty" played hockey and foot- 
ball at high school before going on 
to college. Burtnett has been one 
of the high scorers from B. C in 
the Eagles games thus far this 
season. 



flTIGtUALV'f fU€L UiD< 



WINS STATE TENNIS 
RANKING 



oers of our Selectmen, our M. ( 
from the High School and a news- 
paperman, the impact was terrific. 
This was America, this was unity, 
this was international friendship in 
action, and. above all, Christianity 
united. And on the floor was the 
free press and radio united with 
us - their stories would be carried 



in this statement the com- 
mittee indicates that it i s still 
uncertain whether or not there 
wil! be any harmony in the final 
structure My plea is that the com- 
mittee insist that these wings har- 
monize in color and design with 



Nancy Morse, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Carl Morse of Lloyd 
street, was ranked seventh among 
the younger girl tennis players of 
Massachusetts in the rankings 
made public at Longwnod this 
week. Younger girls are those not 
15 when the year began. Another 
Winchester girl. Sylvia Crowelli 
o f Collamore street, would un- 
doubtedly have been among the 
first ten ;n the rankings, if she had 
not neglected to be registered. 



The Junior Circle of the Florence 
Crittenton League held it- winter 
meeting on Tuesday, January 9th, 
8:00 p. m. at the home of Mis. 
David Walton. 

Mi-. Sanborn Vincent, President 
presided at the business meeting. 
Reports were read by the commit, 
tee chairmen followed by discus- 
sions on activities. The spring 
formal dam e- will be held on Satur- 
day, April 28th. 

After the meeting Mrs. Manning 
Morrill entertained the gioup with 
her delightful monologues, and 
later a movie on The Man n of 
Dimes was shown. 

At the close of the evening de- 
licious refreshments, effectively 
arianged, were served by Mrs. C. 
Andrew Perkins Jr., and her tea 
committee. 



EVERYTHING IS 
eWEET A KiD ROSV, 
WHEW A HOME IS 
WARM AND COZY/ 




Those who have short wave sets 
can hear the program at last Sun- 
day's reception of gifts from Hem- 
roulle broadcast to Belgium over 
Station WRUL of the World Wide 
Broadcasting Foundation at 3:30 
p. m. Saturday. 



HTZGEMLD 

FUEL CO. 

WINCHfSTER 6-5000 

OIL BUBNtR<AUU«RVI(t 
FUEL OIL 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 12. 1951 



5 



CLASSIFIED 

LOST AND FOUND 

LOST fioM Seelant) wrist watch wi-h 
b'ack (trap, in of sew center, Tuesday 
Finder call WI 



SCHOOL 



erviced 



HEARING OF 
VALUE 



LITTLE 



MARCH OF DIMES 



(Continued from pape 1 1 



SI NDAY. JAM ARV 1 *. 19:.l 



Operation Porchlight to be 
Highlight of The 1951 March 
Dimes ( ampaign 



of 



LOST 

silt- 6 : 



. whit, 
of Wi 



fancy .shoe ska* 
iter I'ond. Findi 



THK LUTHERAN CHURCH OF 
THE REDEEMER 



Mnntvalv Ave., Woburn 



LOST 



On December I. vicinity Chester 
and Swanton streets. I.adv's eold 
liamund rinir. -mall diamund on 
?ach side nf renter scilinit. Reward 
Finder please rail HI 2-3Q50 day- 
time- ; or EAst Boston 7-I1.1S-R 
evenings. 



Rev, 
Res, 
Tel 



Ralph Hjelm, Pastor 
lit- Montwile Avenue 

wo z-soii 



SI. MARY'S CHURCH 

Rev. John P. ORiordan. Pastor 

Assistants: P.ev. Charles Anadore. 
Rev. Francis O'Neil and Rev. William 
Walsh. 



Masses at 7. 9. 10. 11 and 11:50 
Sundav School after the S o'clock 



a. m. 
Mass. 



Morning Worship - 

Church School - t* :4! 



11:1" A. 
A. M 



NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH 



FOR SALE 



i IIURCH OK THE EPIPHANY 

Rev, Hvvight W. Hadlev. Rertor. Rec- 
tory, :i t.lengarrv. Tel. Winchester 6-1364. 
Parish House. Tel. Winchester 6-1925. 



Rev. 



FOR SALE 

exeepttonulb c' 
heater - liefiost 
owner, rush oi 
Offer. T. I. WI 



Chevrolet tuilor. 
n.ilcagr - radio • 
l.'i extras. Private 



itnda 
;()0 i 



- M 



FOR SALE < la rage, •icim'ty uf Mary- 
cliff ami Parkhurst district. $H per month 
Tel. WI r..'.»,.'J-U 



January l l 
a. m. Holy Communion 
!>:'«) a. m. Church School (Upper School. 
11:00 a. m. Morning Prayer and S.'i - 
n . ,, n , 

Kindergarten and Primary Departments. 
Tuesihiy. January II 
10:15 n m. Holy Communion. 
S,w:ng Meeting, Surgical Drew-injjs. 
Chuifh World Service. 
112 :!10 p. m. Luncheon 



Virgess Hill. Pastor. 

30 Pleasant View Avenue. Everett. 
Tel. EVerett 3-0826-M. 

10:4') a. m. Morning Service. 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
CATHOLIC CHURCH 



FOR SALE 



raiiK't 

unable 



FOR SALE lv< 
Brand piano, hand-cu 
full-length Victorian 
buffet. WI li-.'I5U!1 



Modern Crawford elec- 
ible top model, 4 healing 
•oilei - excellent con :ition - 
WI MI5S2.M 

[vers and Pond parlor 
ved mahogany case . 
•ofa. and mahogan;. 



Res Herbert K. A. Driscoll, Pastor 
Rev. Stephen E. Burke 

Masses at 7. 8:45, 10 anl 11:15, 



SECOND CONCREGATIONAL CHURCH 



ell seasoned fireplace 
a/el's Poultry Farm, 
janlJ-H* 



FOR SALE W 

w ood moetly oak. It 
WO Z.a»9l - 2-0*62 

FOR SALE Saddle horse ribbon win- 
liar Ha> Ma:e at Rita Marie stables name 
i'andu. Also complete western tack. See 
John Farlev at Una Marie. jan'-tf 

FOR SALE — Rebuilt washing machine 
and electric refrigerators, standard reliable 
makes only, (lahm and Erickson Co., Inc. 
44? Mass. Aw.. Arlington. Tel. AKlington 
5-432.i d'J-tf 

FIREPLACE WOOD FOR SALE — 
Mostly oak, well seasoned, cut any length, 
delivered to cellar; also kindling for sale. 
J. C. Walker, WAyland, Us Ring 3. 

septS-ti 



WINt HESTER UNITARIAN CHURCH 

Mvstic Valley Parkway and Main Street 

Robert A Storer. Minister 
Mrs, Mary Ranton Witham, Director of 
Music and Organist 

Mrs, Walter Srnallcy, Church Secretary. 
Church Telephone - Winchester 6-0949 



Washington St. at Kenwin Rd. 
Rev. John William Cook. Minister 
10 Kenwin Road 
Tel. WI 6.0766-W 
Church Study, WI 6-lfisa 
Mrs. George Lochman. Organist 



Sunday. January 14. 1951 
'<:<>» A. M. Junior Choir - Metcalf Union 
Room 

School Worship Ser- 



00 A. M Lo 



'• 10 A M. Uppri 
vice - Mover Chapel. 

1 1 
Hal 

1 1 :00 A. 
"Facing T 

km v. 

- :00 p. 

January 
Janua rj 



L-hool 



ptat ion 
Juniitr 
Metcnlf 



Lawrance 

of Worship. Sermon : 

Ilio-h Fellowship 
Union 



Sunday. January 14 

9:45 a. m. Church School. Mrs Itony 
Snyder, superintendent. Classes for ages 
:i to 2::. 

11:00 a. m, Morning Worship. Mr, Cook 
will preach. Sermon title: "Hardening of 
the Heart." 

5:16 p. m. The Youth Group will meet 
at the church and go to the Dorr Memo, 
rial Methodist Church. Lynnhurst, to meet 



Activities for 

Wednesday, 

*:00 p. m. 
held at the 



th grout. ' 
the Week 

January 
The Ann : 
church. 



January 1'. 



a' 7 :00 P. M. Hoy Scouts 
at lo : o A. M Sewing Meet- 

at 'J : I". I' M, Motion Choir 



WANTED 



WAN! EH 

I rooms. adults 
preferred, (all WI 



Small apartment, minimum 
Immediate occupancy 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Corner Mt. Vernon and Washington 

streets. 

Rev. Walter Leo Bailey, Minister. 
Residence: 10 Fnirmount Street. Tele- 
i phone Winchester 6-0427. 



tl Meeting will be 
All members are 
urged to he present. Reports will he given 
and new officers elected. 

Thursday, January 1" 

2:0o p. m The Missionary Society will 
meet at the church. Flection of officers. 

T :O0 p. m. Thi' Chancel Choir will re- 
hearse at the church. 

Friday. January 1" 

SiSHJ P- m. The Junior Choir will rehearse 

at the church. 

Turning Events: 

January 24. Merry Marthas 

January 25. A Night of Magic' 

February 1. Bible Studs Group. 

February v Adult Group. 

Febr ary 15, Church and Prudential 

Committees. 



Mis=. Kimball introduced Mr. 
Greeley of Kilham, Hopkins, Gree- 
ley and Brodie, architects for the 
proposed school plans, who went 
over the plans of the two buildings 
shown on a large screen by Mr. 
Thomas Drupeau of the School De- 
partment. After explaining the 
floor plans in some detail Mr. 
Greeley answered many questions 
which ranged all the way from the 
architecture of the proposed wings 
on the enlarged junior high school 
to the possibility of doing the job 
for the announced cost. Shops, 
stairways, liffhtinK, high school 
i t novations, size of auditorium and 
gyni, w indows, gym exits, possibil- 
ity nf using the buildings while al- 
teration* are in progress, band 
quarters and physical education 
layout were some of l he thinirs 
about w h i c h information was 
sought and supplied by Mr. Gree- 
ley from the platform. Dr. Norn's 
in an attempt to clear up some mis- 
conceptions of what the School De- 
partment wants for shop work, ex. 
plained that Winchester's aim in 
this direction is toward industrial 
arts instruction to give the in- 
dividual the fee! of tools rathel 
than a government prescribed and 
partially subsidized trade school 

Those who came to the hearing 
expecting some verbal pyrotechnics 
were doomed to disappointment. 
The opposition was saying nothing, 
even making no comeback when 
Mrs. Woodward questioned Cap- 
tain Rush's statement that the 
referendum vote showed the town 
rejected the school plan, or when 
VI rs. Spaulding sought to learn b.v 



The March of Dimes campaign 
for 1951, w hich opens Monday, Jan- 
uary 15 and runs through January 
31, will be highlighted here in 
Winchester by a house-to-house 
canvass called Operation Porch- 
light - The Mothers' March on 
Polio. 

• »n Wednesday evening, January 
31, the last night of the campaign. 
Winchester mothers will march on 
Polio. The time is one hour - from 
o'clock. 

place is every home - on 
street - in every neighbor- 



7 to 8 
The 

every 

hood. 
The 

which 



theme is voluntary giving, 
is symbolized, by a glowing 
a shining sign of wel- 



porchlight - 
come. 

The slogan is "Turn On Your 
Porchlight - Fight Polio Tonight.'' 
The star is a mother - multiplied 
over and over again into a vast 
parade of foot soldiers coming to 
call and collect contributions for 
the fight against polio. 

I t should be remembered ,in 
spite of the false optimism across 
the country that the tide of polio 
had receded during the past year, 
that lftTVO was second only to 1949 
as the most serious epidemic year 
on record. Might here at home 
the Middlesex County chapter of 
the National Foundation for In- 
fantile Paralysis owes over $30,- 
(100 for medical care given Middle- 
sex residents and has an empty 
treasury. Last year the chapter 
spent more on Winchester victims 
of polio than it received from Win- 
chester contributions. 

Fighting polio is everyone's job 




Going Away? 



You'll enjoy your trip more if you know that 
your travel funds are safe from risks of loss. Carry 
Travelers Cheques which provide cash as you need 
i:. If lost, you will get a prompt refund. 



Buy Travelers Cheque* hen 1 before you go away. 
They cost only 7r> cents per $100, Furnished in a 
convenient wallet for pocket or purse. 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



Winchester Trust Company 

85 CHURCH STREET • 16 MT. VERNON ST. 

WINCHESTER. MASSACHUSETTS 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT IN»UHANCf CORPORATION 
MEMBER FEDERAL SIltSVE SYSTEM 

BANKING HOI RS: S A. M. to 2 P. M. 
Except Wednesday and Saturday S A. M. to 12 Noon 



a direct question who the members and one way we all can get into the 

of the Referendum Committee are. fight is to turn <>n your porchlight 

The nearest thing to vehemence on January 111 and give generously, 

at the meeting came when Prof. The March of Dimes committee, 

Borden made a personal appeal to headed by campaign chairman, Mrs. 

Captain Rush to consider and co- (I. Moulton Herriek, urgently needs 

operate for the lust interests of volunteers for the Mothers' March. 



WANTED V- ill d •• > inn at. I iron- 
ing at home, everything in the family 
Inn. Call Alt r.-T^V-J. 

WANTED K\ poi'ieneed Woman desire 
baby f,f\iv,' Call WI i-LfTJu * 



W 



W AN ! KI1 

barn, studio 
tn Wineh.st, 
liox I)- 1 II 



Remodelling possibilities of 
tu.retakers cottage wanted 
couple, Writ.- Star Office 



WANTED Mine, to tak, KI50 Buick 
to St. Petersburg, Clurida first week in 
February, lias anil oil furnished. Tel. WI B- 
U10H 

WANTED Exec, secretary mow em- 
ployed! wishes work locally- Arlington. Med- 
ford or Winchester. General office experi- 
ence, stenography, typing, filing, figuring, 
estimating, payroll, accts. rec hilling, etc. 
Write Star Office Box L-10 



Lawrence Cook Organist nnd Director 
of Senior and Youth Choirs 

Mrs Dana R. Perkins, Soloist nnd 
Director of Junior Choir 

John Hunt Chappie, Youth Director 
» • • 

Mrs Hi Stanley Kinsley. Church School 
Superintendent. 

Church Office hours : 

Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. 

Telephone Winchester fi-CUU. At other 
times call Mrs. I. E. Leavitt, WI 6-3062. 



I ll.UVI llllll MKMOHIM. MfTHODIST 
CHt'RCH 



FRIENDLY CIU'RCH AT 
FORK OF THE ROAD 



THE 



Rev. John Snook. Jr.. 
dime .10 Bis St. - 6-0139. 

W. Rnvmund Chase, 
nf the Sunday School 155 

» : '1 1 s - 

Mr. Charles P. Potter. 



Hi-. 



Minister. 

General Supt. 
( ambridge St., 

Organist and 



Sunday. January 14 
Or.'lO n m Church School 
9s30 a. m. Brotherhood. Mr Bailey 
the forum on "Religion in 



will 

the 



APT. NEEDED By March 1 by Win- 
chester couple. Call WI U-0329-R 



WANTED Russell J. Taylor, well 

known Winchester pHperhanger and inside 
painter wishes to add some new customers 
to his list. For expert workmanship call 
WI 6-08T9-W. janS-^t* 



RENTAL WANTED — 7, or more, room 
house, in good residential section, Highland 
avenue district preferred, for adult fami- 
ly. Write Star Office Box I.-l>li. dec29-4t* 



condur 
News. " 

10:4", a. m. Nursery 
10:45 «. m. Morning 
Sermon by Mr. Railey: 
is Civi." 

6:00 p. m. Church Family Service Hymn- 
sing ami showing of the sound film "In 
His Name." 

7:00 p. m. Youth Fellowship 

Monday, January 15 

7 :00 p. m. Boy Scouts. Troop 7. in 
creation Hall 

Wednesday, January 17 

7 :4. r , p. m. Diaronate Meeting 

Thursday. January 1 s 

6:4-i p. m Youth Choir rehearsal 

7 :Mrt p. m. Senior Choir rehearsal 



and Kindergarten. 
Sanctuary Service. 
"Where on Earth 



Re- 



Choir Director 

Morning Service - 10:13 

Sunday School 

9:30 a. m. - Junior 
Drpts. 

10:45 a. m. - Nursery, 
and Primary Depts. 



and Intermediate 
Kindergarten. 



Antiques Wanted 

Call Mr. Reebenacker 

\ Reliable Dealer 



REading 2-1991 



sept2!>-tf 



FIRST CHl'RCH OK CHRIST 
SCIENTIST. WINCHESTER 



Sunday Services at 11 a. m 

Sunday School is held at the same hour 

as the church service. 

Wednesday testimonial meeting S p. m. 

Reading room, 5 Winchester Terrace 
(off Thompson Street I. Open dni'y ex- 
cept Sundays and holidays from 11 a. m. 
to 4 p. m. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



DOMESTIC HELP bull or part time 
domestic help. Nurse-.' Registry, Dennison 
Home Service ST li-1407-M janlS-st* 

BAGGING SPRINGS — In upholstered 
furniture seats repaired and completely 
restored to original position with SAG 
PRUfc' Work done in your home. Divan 
120.76 ; chair. 19.75. Written Lifetime 
guarantee. Quality Upholstering since 
1901. R. L. Wicks & Sons Co. Call 
BEL 5-0991 jy9-tf 

UPHOLSTERING & CANE SEATING — 

For expert work of all kinds. Cali Miss 
Davis. WI 6-051 C-M .formerly Hobby & 
Craft Nook . or B 4 S Upholstery Co. AR1. 
6- lt> IS ja6-tf 



HELP — lor the Problem Drinker I 
There is a way out 1 Alcoholics Anonymous 
can show you 1 Write P. O. Box 16S. Win- 
chester. ja20-tf 

TRAVEL INFORMATION — For reser- 
vations on Airplanes, Shipa. Trains, and 
• t Hotels anywhere in the United States 
or foreign countries Call your Author- 
ited Travel Agent, J. F. McGrath. Jr.. 
Travel Service. WOburn 2-12:14 or Win- 
chester 6-3130. nl9-tf 

WEDDING l AKES — When you want a 
real nice one. or a birthday cake that will 
thrill you. call a studio that makes a 
specialty of only the best in party cakes 
of any kind. Delivery can he made. Tel. 
Emile V. ■, ■ x;( Central street. Woburn. 
WOburn J-1773 ffi-tf 

HELP WANTED 



A more spiritual worship of God through 
individual purity, right motives, inspired 
thinking, and Christian deeds, will he the 
central theme of Christian Science ser- 
vices next Sunday. Subject of the Lesson- 
Sermon is "Sacrament." 

A verse from John i6::t:{. supplies the 
Golden Text I "The bread of God is he which 
cometh down from heaven, and giveth life 
unto the World." 

Matthew's account nf the Last Supper is 
included in the readings from the Bible 
King James Version I : "And as they were 
eating. Jesus took bread, and blessed it. 
and brake it. and gave it to the disciples, 
and said. Take, eat . this is my body. And 
he took the cup. and gave thanks, and gave 
it to them, saying, Drink ye all of it ; For 
this is my blmsl of the new testament, 
which is shed for many for the remission 
of sins' i Matthew 26: 26-29 •. 

The lesson in this story is brought out 
in passages to he read from "Science and 
Health with Key to the Scriptures" by 
Mary Baker Eddy, which include: "If all 
who ever partook of the sacrament had 
really commemorated the sufferings of 
Jesus and drunk of his cup. they would 
have revolutionized the world. If all who 
seek his commemoration through material 
symbols will take up the cross, heal the 
sick, cast out evils, and preach Christ, or 
Truth, to the piMir. — the receptive thought, 
thev will bring in the millennium" Up, 



10:45 A M, Subject for morning ser- 
mon: "Remembering and Forgetting" 
This will be a continuance of last week's 
message. 

6:30 P. M. Methodist Youth Fellowship 
Fireside worship with Mr. Ralph Pingree 
and Dr. Charles Mingins. new counsellors, 
seting off a challenge for the new year. 
iNote: Officers and all members who wish, 
will meet at 5:00 P. M to work on the 
years' programs. . 
This Week: 

Thursday 

7 :4."i P. M - \nnual meeting of the Men's 
Club. It is the last meeting under our 
faithful president Ken Lamprey and our 
hest expression of thanks will be by our 
attendance Norman Hall. Assistant En- 
gineer of the Construction Division of the 
M. D. C. will he the guest speaker. His 
subject will concern the Intricacies of the 
water supply system of greater Boston. 
See You Thursday, 
looking Ahead 
There will be a reception of members on 
j Sunday. February Itth when the pastor 
begins his fourth year as minister at Win- 
Chester. This will also he the beginning 
| of the Lenten season and an appropriate 
i time to renew our efforts of steady church- 
j going Registration will be taken each 
I Sunday to get information in the interest 
of the church. If any new people desire to 
j join our fellowship, who have not spoken 
j to the pastor, he will be pleased to serve 

( you. 

I Note - This coming Wednesday, Mrs Frank 
J, Hodge of 17 Kdgehlll Road will he cele- 
brating her BOth birthday. She will he in- 

I formally at home from 2 to ."> P. M. to 
Welcome friends who desire to visit. 



the schools, and when Mr. Clarke 
of the finance Committee leaped 
hastily to his feet to protest a pro- 
posal to rut out the bond issues in 
payment fqr the schools and pay 
for the job from revsriue as a 
means of thwarting another refer- 
endum! 

During the meeting assurance 
was given that the proposed addi- 
tions to the Junior High School will 
harmonize with the present build- 
ing, and that the auditorium can be 
enlarged to a capacity of 1,120(1 
seats if the town wants to spend 
the extra money involved. 

Mr. Tansey was introduced by 
Mrs. Kimball as moderator for the 
meeting and handled his important 
post ably, impartially and with 
just the right blend of ditrnity and 
humor. 

NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 

Mr. James P. White of Wedge- I 
mere avenue has been appointed 
a member of the Massachusetts j 
Market Authority by Governor i 
Dever, his appointment having been 
i confirmed by the Governor's Coun 
oil. Mr. White is a former presi- 
dent of the Boston Fruit and Pro- | 
duce Exchange, 

Mrs. Celia Dawson, who passed 
away suddenly Wednesday even- 
at her home in Stoneham, was the 
mother of Mrs. Edward L. Xeer- 
gaard of Ardley road. 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Samp- 
son (Eileen F.ason) announce the 
birth of their second son, Robert 
Jeffrey, on December 27th at the 
Winchester Hospital. Maternal 
grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Rob- 
ert II. Kason of Highland avenue. 



Women willing to join in the one 
hour Operation Porchlight are 
a^ko<l to call the March chairman, 
Mrs. Frank Garleton, WI 6-1584, 
or their precinct chairman: 
Precinct 1 

Mrs. Paul I.amarche 
Precinct 2 

Mrs. John Doherty 

Mrs. Harvey Macaulay 
Precinct 1! 

Mrs. Donald Dalrymple 

Mrs. Dean ( arleton 
Precinct 1 

Mrs. Irving Tourtellot 

Mrs. Richard Hateman 

Mrs. John Gibbons 

Mrs. Ronald Davis 
Precinct 5 — 

Mis. Charles Jellison 

Mrs. Michael Donlon 
Precinct f> — 

Mrs. William Abbott 



Den f> none 

Den IS Peter Bryant 

Den 7 Jack Ghiranlini 

Den S Gerry Sarno 

The Pack will conduct a waste 
paper drive im Saturday, January 
13 in Precinct ". Notices have 
been circulated and people a r e 
asked to have the paper ready for 
pick-up on Saturday morning. The 
Cubs will be around early to get 
the paper from the houses onto 
the side walk from where trucks 
will collect it from 10:00 to 12:00 
and from 1:30 to 3:30. Help the 
Cubs by giving your old papers anil 
magazines. 

All but one Cub of Den 3, in 
spite of the bad storm last week- 
end took a hike in the Fells con- 
ducted by the Den Dad, W. James 
Masterton, and Mr. Dana Kelly. ! 
Finding and identifying squirrel | 
tracks, locating a hole where a 
mouse had" tunneled under the snow j 
and flushing out a pheasant were ; 
the highlights of the day. A hot- 
dog cook-out before returning home 
kept the spirits high. 



FIRST CONGREGATIONAL, CHI RCH 
110 Years of Service to Winchester 



WANTED Man for full or pan time 
work in gas station Tel WI 6>010'J this 
afternoon or evening. 



TO LET 



Hev. Howard J. Chidley, D. D. Minister. 
Residence. Fernwav. 

Rev Donald B Tarr. S. T. B., Assistant 
nnd Director ot Religious Education. WI 6- 

t ORIS 

.1. Albert Wilson. Organist and Choir- 
master. Tel. HYstic 8-4972. 

Mis. James F. Canning. Church Sec- 
retary. WI 6.0328, 

Mrs. Donald B. Tarr. B. S Assistant Di- 
rector of Religious Education : Secretary, 
Church School. WI 6-1056 

Miss Elise A, Belcher. Executive Hostess 
Church. WI 6-17M6; Home, WI 6-1545-W 



FOR RKN'T Furnished room - avail- 
aide for business man or woman - two 
minutes ti. center Tel. WI 6-07H9 



CHURCH SCHOOL STAFF 
TO MEET 



The entire staff of the First Con- 
gregational Church School, includ- 
ing teachers, officers, superinten- 
dents, substitute teachers. Board of 
Directors, pastors, and High School 
helpers, will meet for a supper and 
inspiration Wednesday evening at 
0:45 in the Social Hall. The par- 
ents of the Nursery and Kindeigar- 
ten teachers are providing the sup- 
per so that the staff may enjoy the 
supper as guests of honor in rec- 
ognition of the work they do for 
the children week after week. Mrs. 
William Mock is chairman of the 
supper committee, assisted by Mrs. 
William Burrows. Mis Windsor 
1 arpettter, Mrs. Wilson Lome, and 
Mrs. Lawrence Pexton. 

The feature of the meeting will 
be the presentation by Rev. Donald 
B. Tarr of the highlights of the 
World Conference of Christian 
Education at Toronto last summer 
where he was sent as a representa- 
tive of the First Congregational 
i'hureh School. Mr. Tarr has film- 
strips to illustrate his experiences 
and will use the new machine re- 
cently bought by the Church School 
for projecting kedachrome slides 
and film strips. 

A large attendance is expected. 



Next Sunday morning at 1.1.4". Dr 
i'hidle> will preach on "The Wings of 
an Kagle." 

Church School Hours 

Intermediate and Junior High Depart- 
ments at 9:30; Nursery. Kindergarten, 
Primary, and Junior Departments at 10:4". 

Senior Forum at 9 :30. A movie. "Again 
Pioneers." depicting the migrant prob- 
lem in our counrty. 

Events of th* Week 

Monday 

7 no P. M. - Troop III, Boy Scout Meet- 
ing in Parish Hall 

7:4c P M. - Parish Players Rehearsal 
Tuesday 

10:00 A. M - Social Service Sewing in 
Kindergarten Room 

1' :00 A. M. - Women's Association Board 
Meeting in Ladies' Parlor 

2:30 P M - Chairmen and Co-Chairmen 
of the Kau at Mrs. Stones, 10 Warren 



" I' M 

K i leiergarter. 

Wednesday 

' V V M 

in Social Hal 
" 1.1 P M 



- Cubs 
Room . 



Court of Honoi 



s'aff Suppel 



Rehe 



IX 1 1 



i'i*'a rU' 



Thursii 



P M 



P M 



P M 

Hal! 
P M 



•- Me, 



- M, 



Rehi 



in P. 



■M P. M 
Cars lea 



Rehe 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 
January 15-31 



The Church of the Open Bible 

. C ndenom i na '. ional 
Lord's Ds> : 9:30 A.M.. ( hurch-School : 
1(1:45 A.M.. Worship Service: 7:00 
P.M.. Gospel Service. Rev. C. Helger- 
son. Past„ r . 

Thursday. 7: to P.M.. Prayer Meeting. 

Montvale Ave.. Woburn 

.Incorporated 1S»9> jan.1-4: 



PHIL ATHEA (il EST NIGHT 

The annual Philathea finest 
Night held in the Social Hall of the I 
First Baptist Church. Tuesday 
evening, January 9th, was a most 
successful affair. Contributing in' 
a large part to the success of the 
evening was music by the Win- 
chester High School Girls' Octette, 
trained and directed by Miss 
Eleanor Anifantis. This group has 
graciously and with great talent 
performed for various organiza- 
tions in the town from time to' 
time. It is composed of Shirley 
C ary and Dorothy Brandt, 
sopranos; Joan McFarlane. Patri- 
cia Carroll and Mary Orgettas, sec- 
ond sopranos: Louise Orgettas, 
Janet Archibald and Phoebe Green- 
Wood, altos. The girls sang beauti- 
fully, reflecting their training and 
ability. The selections were "Rain 
and the River" by Oscar J. Fox; 
"Wanting You" from "New Moon" 
by Signiund Romberg; "I Must and 
Will Get Married." An Appalachian 
folk song; "If I Loved You" from 
"Carousel" by Richard Rodgers; 
and "A Wonderful Guy" from 
"South Pacific" by Rodgers. Mar- 
garet Reid skillfully accompanied 
the octette. 

Mrs. Eleanor Foreman of Dan- 
vers presented a most delightful 
talk on the most fascinating of all 
subjects to women - bonnets. Start- 
ing from about the year 1850 she 
showed bonnets and hats of all 
shapes and descriptions, modeled 
by three attractive young ladies. 
Jeanne Barstow, Adele Jonah and 
Pearl Ray. Much amusement and 
pleasure was derived from many of 
those about a hundred years old 
which could almost have been dupli- 
cated in tile past few years. .Nils. 
Foreman interspersed the showing 
..f tiiese bonnets with comments on 
sonic ..f the virtues which we be- 
lieves are portrayed by these bats, 
particularly among them a sense 
of humor, courage, service and love. 
The models emerged from a giant 
hat box on the stage and it is hard 
tu >ay whether the hats made 
them lovelier or they made the hats 
j lovelier. The finale of the dis- 
I play was a beautiful bride's "bon- 
net." modeled so winsomely b y 
Adele Jonah. Margaret Reid also 
accompanied the showing of the 
bonnets with appropriate music. 

Refreshments and a social hour 
followed the evening's program. 
The hostesses for the evening were: 
Mrs. Elmer Ripley, Mrs. Eliza- 
beth MacLeod. Mrs. Harold Ek- 
strom, Mrs. Cecil Pride and Mrs. 
Finest Dade. 



BIRTH 

Mr. and Mrs. Clellan O. Burin of 
o Central street, Woburn, announce 
the birth of a second son Donald 
Alan born December 27, 1950 at 
the Winchester Hospital. Grand- 
parents are Mr. ami Mrs. Wind- 
over Robinson of 125 Washington 
street. Mrs. bitinn is the former 
Annette Robinson of this town. 



WINCHESTER ( I B SCOL'TS 
PACK 6 

At the Pack meeting on Friday, 
January 5, the following awards 
were made: 

Wolf 

David Allen 
Parker Allen 
David Kennedy 
Henry Ki ley- 
Dick Peterson 
Gerry Sarno 
Shawn Scan Ion 
Robert Williams 
Wolf Gold 
Dannv Dennett 
Rilly Ooten 
Hoyt Masterton 
James Towle 
Be a r 

Steve Rochow 
Richard Sears 
Hear '.old 

Walter Ungerman 
Bear Silver 

Stevenson Davies 
Richard Niles 
A service star was awarded to 
Robert deRivera. The following 
received denner stripes: 

Den 1 David Yanl'nimersen 
Den 2 David Littleton 
Den .'1 John Hosmer 
Den 4 Dennis Baker 



MISS GROSS ENGAGED 



Mr. and Mrs. Finest Whitman 
Gross of Wellesley Hills, formerly 
of Winchester, announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Lil- 
lian Hedwig. to Mr. Peter Michael 
Grosz, son of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Grosz of Huntington, L. I. 

Miss Gross attended Boston Uni- 
versity where she was a member of 
Delta Delta Delta. Mr. Grosz is a 
graduate of Phillips Andover Acad- 
emy. After Navy service he was 
graduated from Harvard with the 
class of 1950. being a member of 
the Hastv Pudding-institute of 1770 
and of Pi Eta. 



School Superintendent Forbes H. 
N'orris, with Mrs. Norris. their son. 
Ted, and the Norris pup, motored 
to Winter Park, Fla., last week to 
visit their daughter, "Marnee," who 
is a senior at Rollins College. They 
also visited relatives, Mr. and Mrs. 
William Hartwick at Sanford, Fla., 
and made the whole trip without a 
motoring mishap, which is a good 
ad for thos,. Pontiacs that "Hy" 
Moody dispenses. 



FRAME YOUR PICTURES 

Your photographs, pastels, oils, and water colors will take on 
an added feeling when framed in a moulding STYLED BY 
STEVENS. 

Visit our large showrooms soon. See our selection of hand- 
some, inexpensive frames and mouldings. Documents, degrees, 
and diplomas last longer, look nicer when framed. 

GIFTS — CLASS TOPS — MIRRORS 

Malcolm G. Stevens 

78 Summer Street ARlington 5-4112 

(Cor. Mill Street — Sear Arlington Center) 



WEDDING GOWNS 

Exclusive creations. Beauti- 
ful workmanship. Made to 
order, ready to wear, also 
bridesmaids gowns. 

SERI GELEMAN 

9 Ravine Road. West Medford 
Tel. ARIinitton 5-051C-J janl2-:it* 



FOR ALL 

Automobile repairs on all make* 
of earn, rail 

Christian W. Eriksen 

20 Grove Plaee. Wineheater 
WI 6-3132 

Specializing on Buicks and 
(ieneral Motor ears. 

.!.■.'-■ -f 



Shaker Glen Farm Store 

8 Thompson Street Winchester 
Tel. Winchester 6-1754 



SPECIAL THIS WEEK 
- CUT CHICKEN - 



BREAST 
THIGHS 
LEGS 
LIVERS 



$1.10 
95c 
95c 
75c 



lb. 
lb. 
lb. 

1 2 



lb. 



Try our own home made Chicken Soup 
and Clam Chowder 



FRESH KGGS 



CHICKEN and FOWL 



FIREPLACE WOOD 

LOAM — MANURE 
Asphalt Driveways 
Chimney Repairing and 
Mason work 

J. A. COSTANZA 

MElrose 4-7812 novK-tf 



Harvey's Barber Shop 

Plenty of Parking Space 

Winchester Place 

opposite Police Station 



rs-tf 



CARPENTER 

Specializing in small home 
repairs 
ROY W. WILSON 
5 Cliff St. WI 6-OlsO-W 

aept2!i-tf 



EMBASSY HAND 
LAUNDRY 

Complete Laundry and 
Dry Cleaning Service 

595 Main Street 

Same Building as First Nat'l. 
Store Super Market 

For delivery call WI 6-2220 

aepta-tf 



MOFFETT 

TAXI SER VICE 

Winchester 6-1730 

malH-tl 



GALUFF0 S TAXI 

Wedding* and Long Trips 
Special Kates 

TEL. WI 6-0602 




ALLEN'S TAXI 

PROMPT DEPENDABLE 
SERVICE 

Call Winchester 6 0792 

aeptl-tf 



LANE TAXI 
SERVICE 

Local and distance tripB 

Call Winchester 6-2580 



THE NEW 

WINCHESTER CAB 
TAXI 

Local and Long Distance 
21 — HOI R SERVICE 

Karl C. Jordan 

Phones 
Days - 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Winchester 6-1931 

Nights - Sundays - Holidays 
Winchester 6-3583 




COUGHLIN JUNK CO. 

Ham. Paper. Mafailnaa 
Metal 

Tel. Winchester 6-2040 

maS-tf 



Dr. Ruth A. Boule 

Chiropodist — Podiatrist 

-.» VINE ST. W1NCHE8TM 
ioppoalt« Winchester Theatra) 
Honrs bj Appointment Only 

Tel. Winchester 6-19K9 



FLOORS 

NEW FLOORS LAID 
OLD ONES RESURFACED 

MERENDA FLOOR CO. 

Tel. Winchester 6-1771 or 
Winchester 6-3123 



WILLIAM BLANCHARD 

CO.. INC. 
Awnings Tents 
Venetians Blinds Shades 
Tel. CRystal 9-0379 
456 Main St., Wakefield 

raalS-tf 



Thomas Quigley, Jr. 

CONTRACTORS 
CEMENT AND STONE MASON 
MOTOR TRANSPORTATION 
Power Shovel Air LompreaMr 

Road Roller Drillinc 

Concrete Miler Blaatinc 
Tractor Kork Kicaratlns 



WINCHESTER'S 

JUNK DEALER 

HIGHEST PRICES PAID 

Call Ed Murphy 

TEL WI 6-1346-M 



MACEFIELO 

hand wrought 
jewelry and silver 
10 Winchester place 
wi 6-2989 

JjrT-tf 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 1951 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
EARL H. BUTT. Reg. Pharm. 

Announces the purchase of 

THE WINCHESTER DRUG CO. 

AT 564 MAIN STREET 

and the continuance of 
the business under his 
Personal Management 




WINCHESTER SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE NOTES 




LIBRARY ACTIVITIES 



Best sellers ten years ago — 1911. 
Have you read them? 



GIRL scons 

The program Committee of the 
Girl Scouts Council met this past 
week to discuss the details of com- 
iiiK events. This committee along 
with the other planning groups is 
responsible for the excellent pro- 
gram offered to our girls. This 
program aided by the unusually 
fine leadership proves to be very 
popular as shown by the unprece- 
dented high enrollment. We start 
l!t"il with 751 Scouts and Brownies 
(52 troops* 118 troop committee 
members, seven associate Scouts, 
11 assistant leaders and 67 Council 
members - a total of 1041. 

On March 13 the annual Father 
and Daughter Banquet will be held 
at the Town Hall. Mrs. Ernest 
Parker and Mrs. James McElroy 
are Co-Chairmen for this popular 
event. 

The many friends of the Neff 
family, formerly residing on Wood- 
side road, Winchester will be happy 
to know that there is a possibility 
that the Neffs may soon be trans- 
ferred back East. They now make 
their home in Olathe, Colorado. 
While in Winchester Mrs. Neff and 
the two girls were active in Girl 
Scout work. 

Mrs. Barbara Metcalf was asked 
to show the slides of* the trip to 
England at the Melrose Annual 
Meeting of Leaders and Council on 
Tuesday, January 9, 

The Public Relations Committee 
for the Girl Scout National Con- 
vention (to be held this fall in 
Boston) held its first monthly 
meeting last week and appointed 
Mrs. Robert Lowry, of Winchester 
as Chairman of the Exhibits. These 
are to be window displays through- 
out Metropolitan Boston. The ex- 
hibits and displays at the conven- 
tion proper will be handled by a 
different committee. 

The 5,000 envelopes for the 
March of Dimes Campaign have 
been prepared by the Girl Scouts 
and are now ready for distribution. 

Do you have a couple of hours 
to give to your community? In 
these troubled times it helps to 
know that the children in our com- 
munity are well supervised There is 
an urgent need for three Troop 
leaders. It is not necessary to 
have had special training or to 
have special talents, a willing hand 
and heart are the two require- 
ments. Do call the Scout Office 
i Winchester 0-2592) if you can 
help. 

50TH BIRTHDAY 

Carl E. Morse of Lloyd street 
was pleasantly surprised by friends, 
neighbors and relatives on Wednes- 
day evening of last week on his 
Fiftieth Birthday. 

The feature of the evening was a 
huge birthday cake appropriately 
decorated with stamped letters, 
addressed to him bearing birthday- 
wishes; street letter boxes; parcel 
post boxes; and a replica of the 
front of the local Post Office build- 
ing. All of those were cleverly 
moulded on the frosting. 

Carl is a carrier at the local Post 
Office and is married to the former 
Priseilla Laraway of this town. 
They have three daughters; Cyn- 
thia, a freshman at the University 
of Massachusetts, Marjorie, and 
Nancy, members of the sophomore 
and freshman classes, respectively, 
at the local high school. 



Fiction 

L The Keys of the Kingdom, by 
A. J. Cronin 

2. Random Harvest, bv James 

Hilton 

3. This Above All, by Eric Knight 

4. The Sun Is My Undoing, by 

Marguerite Steen 

5. For Whom The Bell Tolls, by 

Ernest Hemingway 

6. Oliver Wiswell, by Kenneth 

Roberts 

7. H. M. Pulham, Esquire, by John 

P. Marquand 

8. Mr. and Mrs. Cugat, by Isabel 

Scott Roriek 

9. Saratoga Trunk, by Edna For. 

ber 

10. Windswept, by Mary Ellen 
Chase 

Non-Fiction 

1. Berlin Diary, by William L. 

Shirer 

2. The White Cliffs, by Alice Duer 

Miller 

3. Out Of The Night, bv Jan 

Valtin 

4. Inside Latin America, by John 

G unt her 

5. Blood, Sweat and Tears, bv 

Winston S. Churchill 

6. You Can't Do Business With 

Hitler, by Douglas S. Miller 

7. Reading I've Liked, ed. by Clif- 

ton Fadiman 
X. Reveille In Washington, bv 

Margaret Leech 
9. Exit Laughing, by L-vin S. 

Cobb 

10. My Sister And I, by Dirk van 
der Heide 
Recorded music every Wednes- 
day at 3 p. m. and agsiin at 7:30 
p. m. in the Downs Room. Music 
Program for Wednesday, Januarv 
17: 

Quintet in F Minor (Third move- 
ment) — Franek. 

Symphony No. 98 (Third and 
Fourth movements) — Haydn. 

Concerto for Piano and Orches- 
tra No. 1 — Tchaikovskv. 
Siegfried Idyll — Wagner. 
Pomp and Circumstance March 
I — Elgar. 

Educational films every Friday- 
evening at 7:30 (Family Night") 
and every Saturday morning at 
10:15 a. m. (for the children). Film 
program for next week Friday, 
January 19 and .Saturday, Jan- 
uary 20: 

Children of Switzerland 
People of Western China 
Our Foster Mother the Cow 
Cartoon 

Library Hours 
Adult Department 10 a. m. to 9 
p. m. Saturdays 10 a. m. to t! p. m. 

Boys' and Girls' Library 10 to 12 
noon. 1 to 6 p. m. 

Tel. Winchester 6-1106 



VIVIAN GILES 

PLAYS FOR PROFESSIONAL 
WOMEN'S CLUB 

Vivian Giles, internationally 
known concert pianist, played to a 
most enthusiastic audience of mem- 
bers of the Professional Women's 
Club of Boston and their guests on 
the evening of January second in 
the Bay State Room of the Hotel 
Statler. Among the compositions 
which gave particular pleasure to 
her audience were "Improvisa- 
ations" by Edward MacDowell, 
"Love's Awakening Concert Walse" 
by Moritz Moszkowski, "The But. 
terfly" by Edvard Grieg, and "Lie- 
bestraume" by Franz Liszt. 

An honor graduate of the New 
England Conservatory of Music 
and a former member of the Pro- 
fessional Women's Club during her 
residence in Winchester, Mrs. Giles 
has lived for the past fifteen years 
in Buenos Aires, where she" has 
given many unique concerts before 
the music lovers in that city. Be- 
fore she returns to South America 
next month she plans to make re- 
cordings of her skillful and sensitive 
interpretations of the works of the 
great composers, which will be a 
satisfaction to her many friends 
and admirers here in the United 
States. 



Delegates from the west side 
of Winchester appeared before the 
School Committee last Monday 
evening to report misconduct of 
pupils im the school bus. 

Steps are being taken at once to 
correct tJ )e situation. 

The School Committee gave fur- 
ther consideration to the school 
budget and ; ( . salary requests. 

It was voted to have a special 
School Committee meeting next 
Monday night to discuss certain 
matters with the Washington 
School Building Committee and to 
consider further the wage and 
[ salary requests received from 
school personnel. 

The School Committee voted that 
beginning on Monday, January 15 
the lunch hour at all elementary 
schools will begin at eleven forty- 
rive and end at twelve-thirty. Dis- 
missal will be at two-thirty. Notes 
will be sent to each home stating 
that parents should decide whether, 
under the new schedule, their child- 
ren are to take lunches to school or 
not. In either case, the pupil 
should follow the same plan every- 
day, and not change. The school 
will expect this. 




FORI M TO SEE MOVIE. 
"AGAIN PIONEERS' 



CO-OPERATIVE BANK PAID-UP 
SHARES 



M.KC TF.MPLF.TON 



REPUBLICAN 21 CLUB 



HERE NEXT TUESDAY 
EVENING 



I The annual business meeting of 
the Winchester Republican 21 Club 
was held last Friday, Januarv 5, 

, 1951 at the home of William Wilde. 

1 After a short business meeting 

; the election of officers took place. 

I The following members will be 

: officers for 1951. 
President - William Wilde 

list Vice-Pros. - William Twombly 

1 2nd Vice-Pres. - Joan Zimmerman 

| Secretary - Jeanne Wilde 

I Treasurer - Janet Pride 



MANN APPOINTED CHAIRMAN 



GIRL SCOUT SKI SCHOOL 



The early demand for the Girl 
Scout Ski School has not been re- 
flected in the response for ticket 
books. Nevertheless the first class 
will be held at 10:00 a. m. Satur- 
day, meeting place, Winchester 
Country Club parking area. How- 
ever if there are not sufficient 
; books sold by the end of the first 
. class, the program may have to be 
curtailed. Ticket books will be 
available at the Girl Scout office — 
; Friday p. m. and at the Ski School 
on Saturday a. m. 



Harvard L. Mann, of 5 Myopia 
Hill road, has been appointed 
Chairmatrof the Committee on Co- 
operation with Bankers, Bar As- 
sociations and others for the 
Massachusetts Society of Certi- 
fied Public Accountants. 

In addition to his activity in the 
Massachusetts Society, of which he 
was president in 1944 - 45, Mr. 
Mann is a member of the New York 
Society of Certified Public Accoun- 
tants, the American Accounting 
Association, and Boston Chapter, 
National Association of Cost Ac- 
countants. 



Alec Templeton, incomparable 
star of concert, radio, motion pic- 
tures and recordings will appear in 
Winchester next Tuesday evening, 
January 10th, in the second conceit 
of the Winchester Community 
Concert Series, which benefits the 
local Smith College club scholar- 
ship fund. 

The concert will be given at the 
High School auditorium at 8:30 
p. m. and Mrs. Gilbert H. Hood, Jr., 
is in charge of arrangements. 

Join TH|TmARCH~~o7 DIMES 



"Again Pioneers," starring Col- 
leen Townsend, will bring the mes- 
sage t.. the members of the Senior 
Forum of the First Congregational 
( hurch when they meet in Ripley 
Chapel Sunday morning at 9:15. 
■earlier than usual. Colleen Town- 
send is the pretty girl, recently 
written up in Life, who gave up a 
promising Hollywood career to 
: study to become a Director of Reli- 
gious Education. This was the last 
; movie she made. 

"Again Pioneers" is a full-length 
movie produced by the Protestant 
Film Commission. It was previewed 
recently by David Archibald, Presi- 
dent of the Forum, who says that 
it presents a gripping message. It 
will draw attention to the problems 
of migrant peoples by showing the 
effects in a small town when the 
question comes up at a town meet- 
ing as to whether children from 
"The Patch" should be allowed to 
attend the public schools. The 
movie presents no solution to the 
problem, but will probably stir 
up discussion as to causes and ef- 
fects of migrant life and responsi- 
bility of Christian young people to 
show some concern. 

The movie will start at 9:15 in 
: order to be finished at the usual 
time. 

The following Sunday, six young 
people of the Forum will be the 
speakers with the thought, "What 
Are We doing to Do About It?" 
They will present ideas growing 
Out of the film, and suggest ways 
in which Forum can work toward 
helping people caught in these cir- 
cumstances. 



T h e Winchester Co-operative 
Bank is now offering to the public 
a limited number of paid-up shares. 
Earnings of 2V . per annum make 
Paid-l'p shares attractive invest- 
ments for educational reserve 
funds, future travel funds, sav- 
ings for security in your advanced 
years, funds for emergencies and 
funds with which to take advantage 
of future business opportunities. 

Paid-t*p shares are sold at $200.. 
Oil per share. An individual may 
hold not more than twenty (20) 
shares ($4000.) Forty (40) share* 
i $8000. 1 may be held in a joint ac- 
count. Interest is adjusted at the 
time the shares are purchased, 



It 

shares, 
ter Co- 
street, 
shares 
quickly 



easy to 
just call 
iperative 
purchase 



ise these 
at the Winches. 
Bank. 19 Church 
the number of 
you wish, interest will be 
adjusted, and sign your 
identifi cation card. 

A check representing your earn- 
ings will be sent you semi-annually 
on or about the first Monday of 
May and November. 

Holders of Paid-l'p shares may 
borrow up to 95'; of the value of 
the shares for any purpose at very 
reasonable rates. 

Unless a banking emergency 
exists, Paid- Up shares are readily 
converted to cash at the Bank. 

The Star acknowledges with sin- 
cere thanks the g-ift of fine calen- 
dars from Parker Lane Winn Com. 
pany, Winton's Hardware, A. Miles 
Holbrook and the Cooperative 
Hank. 



A Classified 
brings Results. 



Ad in the Star 



APPOINTED CHAIRMAN ON 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

j Frederick L. Patton, of 22 Ever- 
ell road, has been apointed Chair- 
man of the Advisory Committee on 
Industrial Accountants, according 
to an announcement bv Richard S 
j Chamberlain, President of that or- 
ganization. 

In addition to his activity in the 
Massachusetts organization, he is 
a member of the American Insti. 
tute of Accountants, the Control- 
lers Institute of America, the Tax 
Executives Institute, and Boston 
Chapter National Association of 
Cost Accountants. 




INFANTILIS 
MNALYUt 



LfeMAlfMj^MlMll 

™ JANUARY II-S1 



WINCHESTER CONSERVATORIES 

186 Cambridge Street Call Winchester 6-0210 

or visit our spacious showrooms 



FOSTER ELECTED TO A. I. A. 

Lewis M. Foster of 34 Lloyd 
street, certified public accountant, 
has been elected a member of the 
American Institute of Accountants, 
national professional society of 
CPA's. He has been associated for 
17 years with the Boston office of 
Spark, Mann and Companv, ac- 
countants and auditors. 

Mr. Foster who was born in Man- 
chester. Massachusetts, is a grad- 
uate of Hawthorne Institute in 
Salem. He also studied at Burdett 
College in Lynn, Boston Univer- 
sity, and Northeastern University. 
He holds a CPA certified from the 
State of Massachusetts, obtained 
by written examination, and is a 
member of the Massachusetts So- 
ciety of Certified Public Accoun- 
tants. 



LET US PLAN 




Join THE MARCH OF OIMES 
January 15-31 



BAKED BEAN 
SUPPER 

Sponsored b\ 
•Mi Kin MARTHAS" 

Second ( iuugregatioual 
< .litirch 

January 13. 6:30 85c 

lor ticket.- telephone 
W inchester 6- 1366 



For Your Present Home 

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2A MT. VERNON STREET 
— KITCHEN SPECIALISTS — 

• Hotpoint Appliances • Youngstown Sinks 

• Hoover Cleaners • Kitchen Maid Cabinets 

• Roper Gas Ranges « Maytag Washers 

During Alterations Caused By Fire 

Call Winchester 6-3061 or Winchester 6-0417 
Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 




TOR HKWfcH 



sut»mm m a ft M 



Thousands of smart shoppers all over New England 
know thai all First National prices are just as low 
as possible, any day, every day. They know that 
the dollars they save on total food bills are more 
important than a few pennies saved on one or two 
items. Thai's why they do all of their shopping 
at First National Stores. 



Fresh Young Roasting Pork 

Pork Loins • lb 4 3c 

Mild, Lean, Sugar Cured 

Cooked Horns »T * 59c 

FACE HALF Lb 6<? c 

Large, Plump, Meaty A - 6 Lb Ave. 

Fresh Fowl "> 45c 

DRAWN READY TO COOK Lb 0 5 c 

Fresh Young Najtive - 2>/2 to 31/ 2 Lb. Ave 

Broilers or Fryers lB 43c 

DRAWN READY TO COOK Lb 59 e 

Fresh, Lerge, Plump For Roasting 5 - 6 Lb Ave. 

Chickens « 55c 

CRAWf- READY FOR THE OVEN Lb 0 O e 

Large, Plump, Mountain Grown, Fine Quality 

Turkeys «-«> 5o c 

TRAWN READY FOR THE OVIN Lb 73 c 
FRESH . Lean, Meaty, Economical 

Shoulders " 45c 

Lean, Rindless, Sugar Cured 

Sliced Bacon " 59c 

£** Qood Value* 

MACKEREL Finer C.oe LB 1 9C 

SWORDFISH Fiitcy Sliced LB 49c 

HADDOCK FILLETS ci..r m*m 



Fancy New England Mcintosh 

Apples 4 >» 29c 

Juicy California Navel - Large Sire 

Oranges D « 49c 

Florida Babiiuice - Natural Color 

Oranges D " 39c 

Juicy Florida - Thin Skinned 

Grapefruit 4 F 29c 



^ 29' 



lb 43c 



Firm Red Rip« 

Torrscstcc* 

Fresh Crisp Iceberg 

Lettuce E £,/' 15c 

New Firm Green Solid Meeds 

Cabbage 2 io c 



BROOKSIDE 

FRESH EGGS 

All Native Grade A 



Large 

SI2E 
DOZ 



65c 



California Pea 

Beans 

Fancy Southern 



19c 



CELLO 



Blue Rose Rice CELLO 29c 



Colored, White, Pimento 

Sliced Cheese 

First National - All Purpose 

Cheese Food 

Cloverdale - Yellow '/ 4 Lb Prinle 

Oleomargarine 29c 

Finest - Smoothy Style 

Peanut Butter 



lb 47 c 



LOAF 79c 

LB 



Save cmc *7UeAe 4iH* 7ea* 
Cost Less Than One cent pmr Cup 

- Golden Rose 



Fine Ceylon Blend 



PKG 25c 



pkg 47c 



Homeland 



Fine India &> CWylon Tea 

PKG dIC 



PKG 



27% . 



Finest - Makes Light Textured Cakes 



29c 



JAR 



Cake Flour % B 29c 

Finest Flaky - Enough for a 9 Inch Pie 

Pie Crust 2 p 9 kgs 27c 



Fancy Large Size 

Walnuts 

Sweet Mixed 

Pickles 



LB 

CELLO 

QT 
JAR 



Timber Lake - Fancy Alaska 

Red Salmon 

Finast Fancy Columbia Riyer 

Steak Salmon 

Norse Prince - In Olive) Oil 

Sardines can 19c 

Timber Lake - Fancy Solid Pack 

White Tuna 

Cloverdale - Solid Pack 

29c Light Tuna 



43c 



can 73c 



can 1 53c 



CAN 39c 



:an 30C 




Saoe. wiik *JiiU JtuvUy M*U 

Finest - New England Style 

BAKED BEANS 

Finest ■ Old Fashioned 

BROWN BREAD 

Fancy Quality Tomato 

FINAST KETCHUP 2 b 'St1 39c 



CAN 21C 



& 17c IS] 




AJI Prices in This Advertisement Effective; at First National Self-Service Super Markets in This Vicinity 



FIRST NATIONAL STORES 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 12. 1951 



7 



POLIO FACTS 



to be able to tell you 
problem of infantile 



I would like 
today that th< 

paralysis eased considerably in the 
year just past. I would like to be 
able to tell you that 1950 was a 
"light" polio year, and that there 
are concrete indications that the 
force of recent polio attacks is 
diminishing. Unfortunately, w e 
must meet realism with realism. 
For polio came with grim reality 
to well over 30.000 Americans in 
1950. 

Under the best possible condi- 
tions, an epidemic of 30.000 cases 
is a staggering load to carry. Com- 
ing as it did on the heels of the 
t ragic, record-breaking epidemic of 
1049, the result was devastating. In 
hundreds of communities scattered 
through every state in the nation, 
the terrible effects o f unpre- 
cedented incidence in 1948 and 1949 
were still evident. When the new 
epidemic broke, it found hospitals 
and convalescent homes still caring 
for hoys and girls and adults, 
too - many of whom would need 
continued assistance during the 
year. Some 30,000 carry-over cases 
remained from as far hack as 1934 
who could not and would not — ■ 
be ignored. All of them were get- 
ting needed help. And, whether you 
realize it or not, it was you who 
were giving that assistance. 

Through the years, your con- 
tributions to the work of the N'a- 
tional Foundation for Infantile 
Paralysis had made possible aid to 
the stricken. Rut by the time 1949 
was over, more than 1,000 Chapters 
in 45 states had gone broke meet- 
ing increased demands for patient j 
care and were operating on emer- 
gency advances from the national 
office. The national office itself 
was in a financial crisis, having 
poured out all its patient care re- 
serves to meet emergencies in the 
field. This item alone bad cost 
$27,000,000 in 1949 and. for the 
first time in its history, your Na- 
tional Foundation had to conduct 
an emergency drive. The critical 
situation was temporarily relieved 
by the $30,000,000 you contributed 
to the March of Dimes in January, 
1950, Hut we needed everv penny 
of it. 

We found out in 1950 that light- 
ning can strike twice even three 
times in the same place. For the 
third consecutive year, the summer 
months brought all the dread, all 
the heartaches, all the tragedy that 
we had hoped to he spared. Again 
in Texas and California and other 
states that had been dealt so many 
bludgeoning blows in the past, the 
disease developed and spread. In 
time, the mid-West and the North- 
east were slugged again — and 
severely. Some parts of the South, 
which had somehow escaped the 
worst blows of 1949, were hit hard 
this time. In Virginia, the little 
town of Wytheville. with a popula- 
tion of 50,000 people, and a record 
of no polio case in six years, sud 



denly found itself the center of the epidemic zones, 
most vicious, concentrated polio March of Dimes 
epidemic of the year. 

As polio returned in force in 



1950, your 2,8000 National Founda 
tion Chapters were working day in 
and day out to meet the pressing 
demands of the record case load. 
Overnight, their responsibilities 
Were doubled. The treatment and 
rehabilitation of "old" case 
could not be neglected for a single 
moment. But even more urgent 
were the needs of the ever-increas- 
ing numbers of new cases, as the 
epidemic developed. 

Here in your own community, 
your local Chapter of the National 
Foundation carried a heavy share 
of the burden. Your local Chap- 
ter — - like the others — paid bills 
for patient care, for nursing and 
physical therapy, for transporta- 
tion, for special hospital equipment 
and appliances — iron lungs, hot 
pack machines, wheelchairs, 
crutches and braces. Chapters 
everywhere saw that hospitals and 
treatment centers were sufficient- 
ly staffed and equipped to meet 
the emergency. They formed a con- 
tact-point between stricken fami- 
lies and the medical aid they so 
desperately needed. Mothers and 
fathers who suddenly found their 
whole world spinning about in the 
cold, inescapable reality of the 
word "polio," quickly discovered 
that neither they nor their children 
would have to fight their battle 
alone. 

Your March of Dimes money 
came back to Middlesex County to 
help your friends and neighbors. 
And it was helping to win the fight 
against polio in other places, too. 
Fifty per cent of the money you 
irave tn the Marc h of Dimes had re- 
mained with your local Chapter. 
The other half had been sent to Na- 
tional Foundation headquarters to 
finance research and professional 
education, and to be used for epi- 
demic emergency aid. Whenever a 
Chapter used all its local resources 
in caring for patients, the nation- 
al office poured mole money into 
the area from its emergency aid 
fund. Rut even that fund had its 
limitations. As more and more 
Chapters went broke, emergency- 
aid was being sent out at the rate 
of $1,000,000 a month. 

Before the year was out, there ! 
was no more money. The increase j 
in March of Dimes contributions 
bad been inspiring. Rut it just had 
not kept pace with the rising tide of 
polio. In the first ten years of its 
existence your National Foundation | 
had dealt with incidence that aver- 
aged slightly more than 11,000 
cases a year. Suddenly, in the short 
space of three years, more than ' 
100.000 persons "were hit by the 
disease. Four out of very five of j 
these needed help, in some measure, 
from your National Foundation. 

Today, the organization that you 
have supported so generously each 
year again is operating at a deficit. 
I. ate in 1950 we were forced to call 
upon all Chapters in lightly hit 
areas to place their uncommitted 
funds in a national pool to assure 
continuing financial assistance foi 




YOU CAN 
BE SURE 



How oan the patient kn,-w ihnt 
he is K«'UinK the 1»*'M in prescription 
medicine? By patronizing ;t phar- 
macy known to physicians nn<! lay- 
men alike tot it^ dependability ami 
the hifch Quality of its work, 
through years of community aer- 
vice. we have earned nst snrh a 
proud record When you have a 
prescription to be filled, entrust it 
to our experienced hands Then 
you can be sure of the best in 
prescription medicine. 



©PHARMACY^ 
294 WASH ST.fiVg 
WINCHESTERS^ 



Part of our 1951 
receipts — those 
accruing from special gifts — have 
been collected in 19">0 and already 
used to meet 1950's obligations. 
Rut. despite these emergency meas- 
ures, we still have not met all hills 
for the year, bills which continue 
to p:'e high on the desks of our 
Chapter offices. They will not stop 
entiling just because the year has 
ended. The polio problem is not 
that simple. All through the com- 
ing year we will be paying the price 
of epidemics that have long passed 
into history. All through the corn- 
ing year we will be paying for the 
rehabilitation of the thousands of 
boys and girls who are learning to 
live with the handicap of infantile 
paralysis. The extent of our as- 
sistance depends entirely upon your 
generosity in the forthcoming 
March of Dimes. 

While we are helping these chil- 
dren, while we are paying for pa- 
tient care and meeting the demands 
of new epidemics in 1951, we will 
be fighting another battle, too. In 
that battle, our prospects for the 
future are much more encouraging. 
Our main objective, your main ob- 
jective, is to find the means of end- 
ing this recurring problem for all 
time. We can do that only by find- 
ing a way to control the disease. 
Every day of the year your March 
of Dimes money is at work in the 
nation's laboratories and research 
centers, supporting scientific in- 
vestigations into the nature of the 
polio virus, how it is transmitted, 
how it grows, how it cripples, how- 
it descends upon whole com- 
munities with epidemic force. 

The news from those laboratories 
is heartening. It tells us that more 
progress has been made toward con- 
trol of infantile paralysis in the 
past ten years than was made in all 
the preceding centuries. Last year 



Announcing 



The New Plymouth Cranbrook Four-Door Sedan 




Featuring improvements which produce unprecedented roadability and riding qualities, the beautifully 
redesigned 1951 line of Plymouth cars have numerous mechanical improvements and have retained their 
traditional roominess. Shown above is Plymouth's Four-door Cranbnwk sedan. 



• * • 



• * • ' 



New Plymouth Combines 

Beauty and Riding Ease 

THE NEW 1951 PLYMOUTH CARS WILL BE ON DISPLAY 
SATURDAY. JANUARY 13. COME IN AND SEE 
THESE 1951 JEWELS! 

LOGAN and CHRUSZ MOTORS INC. 



Ginjjfer — Plymouth 





7 Shore Road 



SALES and SERVICE 

OPEN ALL DAY 
Tel. Winchester 6-3190-0920 



Winchester 



AMERICA'S 

MASTER 

MOVERS 




we learned that scientists definite- 
ly expect to find the means of con- 
trolling the diseases within our life- 
time. That was no idle prediction. 
It was based upon scientific fact, 
upon new knowledge developed 
through research that you have 
made possible. 

Today, we need the hope that 
such knowledge gives us. As we 
look to the job ahead of us, as we 
walk through the polio wards of 
our hospitals and watch these chil- 
dren as they struggle courageously 
to meet life with the odds stacked 
against them, we know that we 
can't quit now. We have to help 
them. Xext year there will be 
thousands more to help. But next 
year, too, we will be that much 



closer to the final answer to the 
problem of polio. 

So please give generously to the 
March of Dimes. Your money will 
give some child a chance to walk 
again. And it will hasten the day 
when children everywhere will walk 
in freedom from this crippling dis- 
ease. They need your help. 

Please lend a hand. 



WINCHESTER ART 
ASSOCIATION 



A. C. Doherty, Winchester, is 
chairman of the "Past Presidents' 
Night." honoring the Past Presf- 
dents of the Automotive Boosters 
Clubs, to be held at the Bradford 
Hotel, Monday evening, January 
15. Twenty-seven Past Presidents 
will be honored. Mr. Doherty is 
president of the organization. 



Take full advantage of the 
modern facilities and know- 
how of ALLIED VAN 
LINES— be sure of a safe, 
swift move . . . expert pack- 
ing and careful handling. 



As agents for ALLIED, 
that's the kind of service 
we offer for either a local 
or long-distance move. 
Both temporary and per- 
manent storage facilities. 



Arlington Storage Warehouse 



Edmund L. Frost, President 

20 Mill Street 



Thomas J. Keefe, Manager 

ARIington 5-0603 



Caff vi for cevaitf or »itiiraf$ 



A9INT 



1 ALL t ED VAJV HIVES, ire 

I WORLD'S LAROiST IONO OISTANCI MOVERS 



Your Family Wants 
The BEST Bread 

ind bv BEST is meant bread that is FRESH, WHOLE- 
SOME IN FLAVOR an.) HIGH IN NUTRITIONAL 
VALUE ... A lot to expect from ONE loaf hut you 
get all three in 

20th CENTURY BREAD 

t.et a loaf TODAY at vour neighborhood INDE- 
PENDENT GROCERS, who also has these famous 
products: 

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and the finest roll- of their kind: 

20th CENTURY BROWN n SERVE 
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lu-t Put rhem In The Oven Reach in 7 Minutes 



Professor Herbert D. Lamson, 
vice-president of the Winchester 
Ait Association, announced at the 
association's meeting opening the 
January exhibition in the art gal- 
leries of the Public Library, that on 
February -1 — the day before the 
holiday — those wishing to exhibit 
pictures at the Twentieth Century 
Association galleries, Joy street, 
Boston, will take their pictures to 
the home of G. Russell Mann. cor. 
tier of Fenwiek road and Grove 
street, that they may lie transport- 
ed to the exhibition rooms of the 
Twentieth Century. At the time 
the poll was taken last summer 
about thirty artists of the Win- 
chester Art Association signified 
their intentions to exhibit at this 
showing, then arrangements were 
made with tiie Twentieth Century 
Association to have Winchester 
represented. The exhibit will open 
February 25, Sunday, and run 
through until it is time for it to 
be homeward bound to take its 
place in the members' exhibition of 
the Winchester Association at the 
Winchester Public Library galleries 
in April. 

Professor Lamson, as presiding 
officer at the January meeting of 
j the Winchester Art Association, in- 
troduced Carol M. Nickerson. 
i Mrs. Mollis W.i, mistress of the 
- potter's art. who carried on an in- 
structive conversation as she dem- 
onstrated tiie work of making pot- 
tery. She mentioned that Robin- 
son Crusoe on his lonely Pacific 
isle tried his hand at making pot- 
tery and messed up his product in 
the tiring. In the tiring idea Mrs. 
Nickerson, Crusoe and Professor 
Lamson had something in common. 
Professor Lamson in his introduc- 
tion said that he had an especial 
interest in the evening's proceed, 
ings as he recalled that as a boy in 
New Hampshire he dodged the 
spooks that issued from the pottery 
kilns uf his grandfather and father. 



A few minutes after the professor's 
introduction Mrs. Nickerson gath- 
ered up clay and threw it at hei 
electric pottery wheel with deft and 
experienced hand and began shap- 
ing her wares. In the audience sat 
Laura \V. Watkins of Winchester, 
author of the book, "Early New 
Kngland Potters and Their Wares." 
which is on the shelves of the Win- 
chester Public Library. Sitting 
with Mrs. Watkins was her hus- 
band, Charles Hadley Watkins. 
print collector and past president 

of the Winchester Art Association. 

Marion Ladd Symmes and May 
Bennett Brown whose pictures 
grace tiie walls at the art exhibit 
for the month of January were in- 
terested observers of Mrs. Nicker- 
son 's demonstration. Miss Pauline 
Goodrich, chairman of the Exhibi- 
tion Committee made up the pro- 
gram. 

Le Petit Gourmet: It was superb. 
Interest among the large number 
attending this meeting was main- 
tained by Vivien Frazier, (Mrs, 
Richard H.) chairman of the hos. 
pitality committee, and her assis- 
tants, Dorothy Miller, (Mrs. Miller 
F.», the Misses Sue Gleason and 
Helen Redfern. Mrs. Frazier built 
the cake that greeted those who 
partook with the inscription, Win- 
chester Art Association, 1951. 



ST. MARY'S CYO TO PRESENT 
5TH SHOW 



At a meeting called Januarv 3 
l.y Rev. Francis O'Neill, CYO di- 
lector, plans were made for an- 
other of the organization's success- 
ful shows to be held at the high 
school auditorium on Saturday. 
February 3. An afternoon show 
for children will precede the even- 
ing production, 

Father O'Neill will serve as gen- 
eral chairman of the show with 
Culi Chairman Philip Savage as 
chairman and Mrs. Vincent F. 
Krhard as director. Mrs. Leo V. 
Manoli is to lie ticket chairman 
and a complete list of com- 
mittees will be announced later. 

Proceeds from the show will 
benefit St. Mary's CYO to support 
its Hoy Scouts. Girl Scouts, Cub 
Scouts and Brownies, boys' base- 
ball and basketball teams, girls' 
basketball and soft ball teams and 
the Dramatic Croup. At the after- 
noon performance this year it is 
expected that autographed base- 
balls will be given to lucky ticket 
holders. 

WLSWKLL IN NAVY 



DARTMOl TH WOMEN'S CLUB 



The Dartmouth Women's Club 
will hold their meeting in the Em- 
pire Room of the Hotel Yendome 
on Wednesday, January 17, with 
the president, Mrs. Percy K. Glea- 
son, presiding, at 1 o'clock. Mrs. 
Edward Pike and Mrs. Sidney E. 
Judkins will be the pourers at the 
dessert and coffee hour which will 
precede the meeting, commencing 
at 1:15. 

The guest speaker will be Marion 
Tucker Rudkin whose subject will 
be "Book Reviews". Mrs. Frank 
Ford will give Historical Readings 
of Dartmouth, Sketches.Old and 
New. 



Byron C. Wiswell of 70 Fletcher 
street, recently became a member 
of Organized Surface Division 1 - 5 
of the Naval Reserve in Boston. 

Wiswell will receive a nine- 
month training in Navy fundamen. 
tals and then be advanced to sea- 
man apprentice. Through personal 
effort he may speed his advance- 
ment to the next higher rating at 
the end of six months, by passing 
an examination. Upon advance- 
ment, his training in a specialist 
rating commences, 

In addition to this training, he 
will receive an intensive two week 
course along with regular Navy re- 
cruits at Great Lakes, Illinois with 
full pay. Thereafter, he will parti- 
cipate ;n a two week cruise each 
year aboard a Navy warship. 



8 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, JANUARY 12. 1951 



BELGIAN GIFTS RECEIVED 

(Continued from Page l> 

The paintings represent the su- 
preme gift <>f the poor villagers of 
Hemroulle. Nothing in their lives 
could possibly mean more. Before 
these painting they have gathered 
in joy and sorrow for nearly fifty 
years. They had become a real 



< harl 



A. Gallagher, Immaculate 



lives of the people of 



the exact age of 
hey are oils, done 
is that have mel- 

and they aie in 
Many bear the 
bullets and some 



part of the 
Hemroulle. 

No one knows 
the paintings. '1 

in beautiful colu 
lowed with time 
excellent taste, 
marks of Nazi 
were so badly damaged they could 
not be sent to America. They 
measure '-'■> by inches and had 
been hanging in the Bastogne con- 
vent for many yeais, as early as 
IKIif'.. The paintings were given by 
the convent to Mayor Ga^pard in 
1906 and it was he who had them 
placed in the chapel of Hemroulle. 

During the past fall Dr. Navez 
notified Mis. Toye of the proposed 
gift of the pictures to Winchester, 
• electing her first to receive the 
news because of their friendship 
which dates from the "Sheets foi 
Hemroulle" party in 1947 and be- 
cause she at that time headed the 
movement to return the bed linen 
to the Belgian villagers. 

Great care had to be exercised in 
taking down the paintings and in 
getting them to this country, be- 
cause, due to the:r great age and 
war damage, they ate very fragile. 
Mrs. Toye and a small committee, 
known as the Hemroulle Friendship 
Committee, originally planned to 
receive the gifts at a program to 
be held on the Hay before Christ- 
mas, choosing that date because it 
was the anniversary of the Battle 
of the Bulge. 

This date had to be abandoned, 
due to the length of time it took for 
the pictures to reach Dr. Nave-/ in 
Boston, and i: wasn't until just 
about Christmas time that the pic- 
tures actually arrived in New York 
and were sent on to Boston. Dr. 
Navez received them personally 
and brought them to Winchester 
on Sunday, every precaution being 
taken to gel them to town safely 
and to guard them after theii ar- 
rival. Patrolman Thomas Parsons 
was assigned by Police Chief 
Charles J. Harrold to meet the pic 
tures when thej arrived in Win- 
chester and remain with them until 
they were distributed to the Chur- 
ches at the high school last Sundav. 
afternoon. Office i Parsons was in 
the wings of the stage during the 
entile program. Outside the high 
school Traffic Officer James K 
Flaherty reserved space at the en- 
trance to the building for official 
cars of committee members Mid 
invited guests. 

In the halt the stage was decor 
ated with palms and ferns by Cum- 
mings the Florist through the kind- 
ness of Rev. John 1'. O'Riordan, 
pastor of S; Mary's Church, who 
from the first evinced the greatest 
interest and pleasure in the pro- 
gram. Also displayed at the front 
of the platform were the National 
and Belgian Colors, and above 
those seated on the stage were 
hung at the rear two large posters 
depicting the new Coat of Arms of 
Bastogne, with the American Eagle 
as an integral part of the new de- 
sign. 

Representatives of the churches 
of Winchester ushered, including 
Malcolm I >. Bennett. Church of the 
Kpiphany, Mrs. Leon Leavitt, First 
Baptist Church; Ernest Wright, 
First Church of Christ Scientist in 
Winchester; Milton Galucia, Craw- 
ford Memorial Methodist Church: 
Prof. Kugene C Rochow, Unitarian 
Church; George T. Davidson, First 
Congregational Church; Mrs. John 
J. Gorman, St. Mary's Church 



Conception Church, Hizkia Griffith, 
New Hope Baptist Church; and 
Commander Rony Snyder, Second 
' ongregational Church, 

Preceding the program a select- 
ed group of members of the Win- 
chester High School Band, in theii 
colorful scarlet and black uniforms, 
played a group of appropriate se- 
lections from the pit in front of 

the stage, conducted hy Fred Feb 



me: 



director of instrumental music 
in the Winchester Schools. 

When the cut tains parted there 
were seated on the stage in the 
front row, from left to right, Ed 
waid A. Bartlett, master of cere- 
monies; Vincent Farnsworth, Jr.. 
chairman of the Board of Select- 
men; Nicholas H. Fitzgerald, Se. 
lectman and member of the ar- 
rangements committee; John D 
llanlon, former I.t. Col., command- 
ing the 502 Airborne Infantry who 
defended Hemroulle from the Nazis 
duiing the Battle of the Bulge; 
Rev. Howard J. Chidley, D. D„ 
minister of the Fiist Congregation' . 
al Church; Rev. Virgess Hill, pas- 
tor of the New Hope Baptist 
Church; Rev. Dwight W. Hadley, 
lector of the Church of the Epi- 
phany; Rev. John Snook, Jr., pastoi 
of the Crawford Memorial Moth- : 
odist Church; Mr. Edward R. Simp- | 
son, first reader of the First ( hutch 
of Christ Scientist in Winchester; 
Mr. Charles A. Gallagher, repre- 
senting Rev. Herbert K. A. Driscoll, 
pastor of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion Church; Rev. John P. O'Rior. 
dan, pastor of St. Mary's Church; i 
Rev. Walter l.ee Bailey, pastor of 
the First Baptist Church; Rev. i 
John William Cook, minister of the 
Second Congregational Church; j 
Rev. Robert A. Stoicr, minister of] 
the Unitarian Church; Major 
Samuel I.. Hiebert, chaplain, First 
Service Command, Boston Army 
Base; Mrs. Albeit Navez; Col. Leo 
A. Btssett, commanding offieel 
Massachusetts Military District; 
Dr. Albert Nave/., Belgian Consul 
for New England and Mrs. Ken- 
neth B. Toye, chairman of the 
Hemroulle Friendship Committee. 

Behind these were seated from 
left to right James II. Penaligan 
and Mis. Penaligan, committee 
members; Mrs. Edward A. Bartlett 
and Mrs. Nicholas Fitzgerald, com- 
mittee members; Mrs. Vincent 
Farnsworth and Committee Mem- 
bei Kenneth B. Toye. 

An emergency call for his pas- 
toral services pi evented Father 
Driscoll from arriving at the high 
school in time to be seated with the 
other clergy. He did arrive at the 
the hall before the conclusion of 
the program and was seated on the 
stage, being present in time to re- 
ceive the picture for his church. 

Before the curtains were parted 
Mrs. Toye explained to the au- 
dience that with the exception of 
Dr, Navez, every speaker on the 
program was speaking directly to 
Hemroulle. A tape recording was 
made of the program by Fdwin 
Westley of Station WRUL of the 
World Wide Broadcasting Foun- 
dation, who in response to an in. 
traduction by Mrs. Toye, explained 
that the broadcast would be carried 
by his station not only to Hem- 
roulle, but to 58 foreign countries, 
including several behind the "iron 
curtain". Motion pictures of the 
program were taken for Dr. Navez 
from the balcony of the auditorium 
by the high school football camera 
men, "Reggie" and "Jake" Went- 
woi th. 

Because of broadcasting limita- 
tions the program was of about 45 
minutes duration. It had been 
carefully planned and proceeded 
with dispatch and smoothness un- 
der the able guidance of the Master 
of Ceremonies, Mr. Bartlett. 

Mr. Bartlett, teacher and coach 
at Winchester High School, was a 
; lieutenant colonel in the Armv Air 



Forces during World War II, and 
served as a master of ceremonies 
at the "Sheets - for - Hemroulle" 
exercises in 1947. 

Rev. Mr. Hadley, who made the 
invocation in 1047, opened the pro- 
gram in the same way on Sunday, 
asking a Divine blessing on the 
friendship of Hemroulle and Win- 
chester that it may lead the way to 
international peace. The audience 
then joined in singing the "Star 
Spangled Banner", led by Mr. Fel- 
met and accompanied by the band. 

Mr. Bartlett then gave something 
of the background of the Hem. 
l oulle- Winchester friendship, con- 
veyed to the people of Hemroulle 
the thanks of the residents of 
Winchester for the villagers' ex- 
pression of international good will, 
and called upon the Winchester 
High School Girls' Octette, eight 
young ladies in white blouses and 
scarlet skirts, to sing the "Belgian 
National Anthem", accompanied by 
their director, Miss Eleanor Ani- 
fantis, director of vocal music in 
the high and junior high schools. 

Mr. Farnsworth, as chairman of | Hemroul 
the Board of Selectmen, briefly ex- 
tended official greetings from Win- 
chester to Hemroulle, stressing the 
generosity of the Belgians as an 
expression of international good 
will. 

Mr. llanlon, tin- next speaker, 
began bis remarks with a "Hello" 
to his old friends in Hemroulle. 
He spoke of the snow in Hemroulle ! 
in 1944 iind in Winchester during 1 
the program on which he was ! 
speaking, expressing in an im- • 
piessive manner how deeply he was ] 
touched by tin- friendship bond be- j 
tween his home town of Winchester 
and the village of Hemroulle. He 

I seemed visibly moved as he spoke 
and contributed one of the out. 
standing features of the entire j 
program. 

A particularly pleasing feature 
was the presentation by Mr. Bart- 
lett of a corsage to Mrs. Navez, the 
charming wife of the Belgian con- 
sul, with a particularly gracious 
a n d wholly appropriate little 
' speech, the Master of Ceremonies 
adding the gallant touch of pin- 
ning the flowers on the shoulder 
of the smiling Belgian lady. 

Mi. Bartlett then called upon 
Mrs. Toye to introduce her old 
friend. Dr. Nave/., which she did 
briefly hut in a way that left no 
i doubt of the esteem in which this 
friendly Belgian official is held in 
Winchester by all who know him. 
Incidentally Mrs. Toye also wore 
flowers presented to her by the 
members of the arrangements 
committee she so ably led. 

Dr.* Navez' voice all but failed 
him as he told what the friendship 
of Winchester for his country 
means to him. Speaking with a 
charming accent, he told some- 
thing of the feelings of the people 
of Hemroulle as they sent theii' 
gifts to Winchester and how deeply 
they have all been moved by Win- 
chester's kindness and generosity. 

"A deep friendship has been ce- 
mented between our two Countries 
which will never die!", said Dr. 
Navez, as he also explained how 
delightedly the Hemroulle people 
would greet the announcement 
that ten clergymen of all creeds 
in Winchester were together on 
one platform to receive the vil- 
lagers' gifts. 

Concluding his remarks, Dr. 
Navez presented the pictures, 
which had remained during the 
program, face down on a table be- 
side the lectern. They were re- 
ceived for the town by Selectman 
Fitzgerald, who had been designat- 
ed by the Board of Selectmen to 
serve on the Hemroulle Friendship 

• 'ommittee. 

In his brief, but appropriate 
speech of acceptance Mr. Fitz- 
gerald touched upon not only the 
international friendship aspect of 



the gift from Hemroulle but also 
upon the religious significance of j 
the pictures and the strength 
which comes from religious faith in 
combatting the turbulent forces of 
evil in the world today. 

The clergy of the tow n were then I 
called individually by Selectman 
Fitzgerald to come forward and 
receive the pictures presented by 
Hemroulle to the churches they 
represented. The pictures were 
handed to the clergy by Dr. Navez 
in the order in which they happened 
to lie upon the table, and as the 
clergy were not assigned to their ; 
seats in any order each received the 
picture which chance dictated he 
should have. As they were turned 
j to the audience after their receipt 
the beautiful colors and craftman- 
j ship of the paintings brought a 
| gasp of admiration from those in 
. the hall. 

After the presentation Major 
j Hiebert, who had been on duty in 
j Bastogne during the Battle of the 
Bulge and had an intimate know- 
S ledge of the part the sheets of 
played in the defense of 
the village, spoke to the villagers. 
He was followed by Col. Bissett, 
who as representative of Major 
General Charles G. Helmiek, Com- 
manding General, New England 
Sub-Area, First Army, extended 
greetings and good wishes to the 
Belgian Army and civilians. 

Dr. Navez then returned to the 
lectern to read a telegram of feli- 
citation from Baron Silvercruys, 
Belgian Ambassador in Washing- 
ton, whose personal envoy, Major 
Count Izan Dumonceau, Military 
Attache at the Embassy, had been 
grounded by the storm in Newark, 



B VI' 



TIST CHURCH 
SERVICE 



FAMILY NEW 



LOW ROUND TRIP PLANE 
FARES TO EUROPE 



"BOB" McGUINTTY RETIRES 



Once more the families of the 
First Baptist Church will get to- 
gether in their monthly Church 
Family service from G to 7 o'clock 
Sunday evening. January 14th. This 
service of only one hour's duration 
is planned so that the whole family 
may attend and enjoy it together. 
There will fie a short worship 
period and a hymn-sing of your 
favorite hymns, led by Dr. Cecil 
Pride. 

The showing of the sound film 
"In His Name" will complete the 
program. In this story the beau- 
tiful glass window of a church on 
a busy street comes alive with a 
vital message for today, when a 
baseball accidentally hurled by 
some boys in the street comes 
crashing through to desttroy the 
head of the figure of Christ. The 
young minister is inspired to new 
visions of the church's responsibili- 
ty in the community through his 
contact with the unknown urchin. 
The story of how the youngster 
keeps faith through the years is 
dramatically and sincerely portray- 
ed. It is a truly moving story that 
motivates Christian action in every 
man. 

All are welcome. 



For pleasure travel, business. Or 
to visit relatives, 15 day excursion 
fares, round trip, from Boston to: 
Athens $M9:20 
London 402.60 
Paris 430.60 
Rome 522.10 
Shannon :570.70 
Amsterdam 430.00 
Frankfurt 462.00 
Glasgow 380.90 
Copenhagen 462.00 
Stockholm 489.90 
Lowest fares ever quoted. Travel 
from Boston via TWA, Pan Ameri- 
can, Air Fiance, British Overseas 
Airways, all National Scheduled 
Airlines. 

For information and reservations 
call your Authorized Travel Agent, 
J. F. McGrath, Jr., Travel Service, 
14 Eaton avenue. Woburn. Tele- 
phone: WOhurn 2-1234. - Winches, 
ter 6-3130. • 



Tog. 
other 
Star, 
old W 
Grand 



•ther with his check for an- 
year's subscription to the 
Robert F. "Bob" McGuinity, 
inchester boy now living in 
Blanc, Michigan, writes that 
fn 



he has retired 
Motors after 33 yeai 
pany's employ. lie 
at his retirement with 
priate scroll, and with a handsome 



om General 
in the corn- 
eas presented 
an appro- 
El 

case containing two tine pipes and 
a cannister of tobacco. 

"Bob" doesn't intend to rust out 
now that he doesn't have to go to 
business every day. Tiiis spring 
he plans to put in 200 to 300 rasp- 
berry bushes with his usual gar- 
den truck which will keep him and 
his tractor on the move. 

His welcome letter comments on 
the tire in Lyceum Hall and closes 
with the promise to take a trip to 
Winchester this summer to see his 
old time friends and also to visit 
his daughter in Brighton. 



Mr. and Mrs. Warren R. Healey 
left this week to spend the winter 
at Sarasota, Florida. 



A Classified 
brings Results. 



Ad in the Star 



WH€NJT£ 



N. J., en route to Winchester !>.. 
plan.'. 

Then with the hand accompany-! 
ing, Conductor Felmet led the 
gathering in singing "Auld Lang 
Syne", the words of which appear- 
ed on mimeoed programs done for 
the occasion by the high school 
Commercial Department, headed 
hy Miss Helen Bronson. Many 
sang the familiar refrain with 
dimmed eyes, and the emotion of 
the occasion held over for the bene- 
diction, pronounced by Father 
O'Riordan. People filed quietly 
from the hall after the brief pro. 
gram with a warmth in their hearts 
and the feeling of having partici- 
pated in something completely 
worthwhile. 

After the last flash-bull) had 
shot and I 
made theii 
natured Dr 
wife ad 
and Mi 



last flash-bull 
he visiting pr< 
tinal notes, ti 
Navez and his 
lined to the home 
Toye who held a 



icon 
s had 
good 
mi ling 
of Mr. 
harm- 




You'U never be burned 
way your possess' 



ingly informal party in 
their distinguished guest 



honor of 



w hen you have 
moving. 



ms 
us take 



up at the 
are bandied, 
care of your 



Judith Lane of Winchester is a 
member of the committee arrang- 
ing the annual midyear dance of 
the Tufts College senior class to 
he held in the main ballroom of the 
Bradford Hotel Friday evening, 
January 12. The dance will be 
sponsored also by the Jackson Col- 
lege senior class. 



H.J. ERMINES 

4 LINDEN ST.** INCHECTER.MAtt. 

<7eL 6-0568 



BELGIAN AMBASSADORS 
MESSAGE 



Rea. 

New 



Sunday by Dr. Vlbort Nave/.. Belgian Consul for 
Kngland at the Rcmroullp Friendship Meeting 
at the High School 



A deep significance is attached to the ceremony which is 
taking place today. At a crucial time in their destinies, the 
people of Winchester and of Hemroulle have been brought to- 
gether again in a spirit of gratefulness and of friendship. 



for 



the 



They ari' 
the futuri 



joining in a tribute to the past and in a prayer 



It is fitting that in 
Cross. 



doing, they revert to the Stations of 



These St;i 
reflect tin 



we 

in your own 
memories. 



•r.s which endured the siege of 
suffering we share in common. 



the Ardennes may 
Let them remain 
churches as a token of our faith as well as of our 



They 
and thev wi 



will 



stand as the symbol of the hop< 
lear witness to our trust in the 



■ by which wo abide 
light of God. 

Signed 

Baron Silvercruys, 
Belgian Embassy 



ftr a DEPENDABLE Used Car 
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Running out of dessert ideas? 
Here's one that promises to please 
the whole family. Dorothy Muriel's 
Orange Chiffon Pie — made with 
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leave the bakery. Not until then 
are these Orange Chiffon Pies 
topped with fresh whipped cream. 
What a delight! You'll agree — 
when you serve it tonight. 



S r o » f J 

542 Mam StrMt 
WI 6-J038 

A-;---- Dc ■ t I 

Fooa 5-;= ::".«" tntif i» 
ca>M i« A. -g-on 



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WINCHESTER 6-1157 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY. JANUARY 12, 1951 



9 



WUTTBZ fNAPf ty- Jim Connslly 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, «>.. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the trust 
estate under the will of ( LARA L. POND 
late of Wirn heater in Haul County, deceased, 
for the benefit of MARION W. POND. 

The truste**s of said estau- have presented 
to said Court fur allowance their sixth to 
eighth accounts inclusive. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file u written appear- 
ance in said Court at Cambridge before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on the twenty-sec- 
ond day of January 1951. the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, John ('. Leggat, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this twenty sixth day 
of December in the year one thousand nine 
h ndred and fifty. 

John J. Butler, Register. 

jan5-"t 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
ELIZABETH ARMISTE AO late of Win- 
cheater in said County, deceased. 

The administrator of sai l estate has pre- 
sented to i-aid Court for allowance his first 
account. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney shou'd file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the thirtieth 
day of January 1951, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, John (.'. Leggat, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this twenty-ninth day 
of December in the year one thousand nine 
hundred arid fifty. 

janl2-3t 

NOTICE OF LOST PASS BOOK 

In connection with the requirements of 
Chapter 107, Section 20, of the General 
Laws and Acts in amendment thereof or 
supplementary thereto, notice is hereby 
given of the loss of Pass Book til 74 DR. 453 
issued by the Winchester Cooperative Bank 
and that written application has been made 
to said hank for the payment of the amount 
of the deposit represented by said book 
or for the issuance of duplicate book there- 
for. 

WINCHESTER COOPERATIVE BANK 
By Ernest R. Kustis. Treasurer 
;anS-3t 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Mi Idlesex, si. Probate Court. 

To KI< HARD H. BRINE of Winchester 
in said County and the UNION SAVINGS 
BANK of Boston in the County of Suffolk 
and the Commonwealth aforesaid, JOSE- 
PHINE B. BRINE and GEORGE W. 
BRINE of Champaign. WILLIAM MAX- 
WELL BRINE of Haywood in the State of 
Illinois JANE BRINE SANSREGRET of 
Seattle in the State of Washington. LEWIS 
HOWE BRINE c „ General Motors de 
Brasll, Sao Paulo, Caiza Postal 291%, 
lira-, I ami to all other persons interested. 

A |*tition has been presented to said and to all whom it may concern 
Court by JOSEPHINE M. BRINE of Win- 
chester in said County of Middlesex repre- 
senting that she holds as tenant in common 
eleven undivided tifteenths parts or shares 
of certain land lying in Winchester in said 
County of Middlesex and briefly described 
Hi follows: I claiming to be the holder of a mortgage 

A certain parcel of land with the build- covering real property in said Winchester, 
ings thereon, bounded as follows: North- ■ numbered IMS Mam Street, 
westerly by Washington St. ^ibout 123. ft ; , 

Northeasterly by Webster St about 165. ft; given by the defendant to the plaintiff. 
Southeasterly by land now or formerly of j dated January ,i. 1950, recorded with Mid- 
CAROLINE A. PAYNE about 123. ft: and dlesex South Deeds, 7529, Page 118, and 
Southwesterly by land now or formerly of ; also being Document No. 2366S7, noted on 
AMELIA C. GREEN LAW about 170. ft ! Certificate of Title No !S206:i, issued from 
setting forth that she desires that all 1 the Middlesex South Registry District. 



Case No. 14077 Misc. 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Land Court 

i Seal ■ In Equity 

To CHILDREN'S OWN SCHOOL, INC.. 

a duly existing corporation, having an 
j usual place of business in Winchester, in 

the County of Middlesex and said Com- 
■ mon wealth ; 



MEDFORD CO-OPERATIVE BANK, a 

duly existing corporation, having an usual 
place of business in Medford. in said County 
"f Middlesex, 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
Kit HARD S. TAYLOR late of Winchester 
in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court, praying that CHARLOTTE T. 
KING of Maiden in said County, be ap- 
pointed administratrix of said estate, with- 
out giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the twenty- 
ninth day of January. 1951, the return -lay 
of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat. Esquire. First 
Judge of said Court, this eighth day of 
January in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Butler, Register. 

janl2-3t 

RECENT SALES BY 
Rl Til PORTER 




LET5 GET 
MARRIED — 
VOO LOOK 

ut*e A 

SENSIBLE 



FORTNIGHT!. Y NOTES 



of said land may be sold at private sale for 
not less than eleven thousand, seven hun- 
dred dollars, and praying that partition 
may be made of all the land aforesaid 
according to law and to that end that a 
commissioner be appointed to make such 
partition and be ordered to make sale and 
conveyance of all, or any part of said land 
which the Court finds cannot be advantage- 
ously divided either at private sale or public 
auction, and be ordered to distribute the 
net proceed! thereof. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written appear- 
ance in sari Court at Cambridge before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on the twenty-ninth 

day of January 1951, the return day of this I Judge of said Court this 4th day of Jan- 
citation. I uary. 1951. 
Witness. John C. Leggat. Esquire, First 



has filed with said cu rt a bill in equity 
for authority to foreclose said mortgage 
in the manner following: by entry and 
possession and exercise of power of sale. 

If you are entitled to the benefits of the 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act of man of Riverside, Connecticut. 
1910 as amended and you object t.. such f or Captain Eugene Weeks 

foreclosure you or your attorney should \ , 4 no f . . 

file a written appearance and answer in the home at 8.5 Gl'oye Street, Wltl- 

snid court at Boston on or before the ! chester to Mr. W, Henry Johnston 

12th day of February. 1951, or you may be i n f Winchester, 
from claiming that such 



Last Monday the joint meeting 
of the Fortnightly and the League 
of Women Voters was held under 
the sponsorship of the Internation- 
al Relations Committees: Mrs. 
Walter W. Winship, Chairman for 

the Fortnightly and Mrs. Rowland 

Sold for Mr. Norman C. Hitch- Patrick, Chairman for the League, 
cock the property at 121 Church The Dessert Hour preceding the 
street, Winchester to Mr. Norman meeting was made most delightful 
E. Harris of Englewood, N. J. through the efforts of the hostesses 

Sold for Mrs. Aileen D. Woolsey who were: 
the property at 37 Salisbury, Win- Mesdames Conrad S. Rosander, 
Chester to Mr. Marcus R. Water- Harold E. Bergquist, Ralph R. 




AHD A SENSIBLE t mini i 
TO OO TO OAf IS CO TO 

WINCHESTER 
CAMERA SHOP 

TMWft HUM STANSUBOJ 

WILL D€UOIT , 1 




WINCHESTER CAMERA SHOP HAS THE NEW 



for 



bai red 



foreclosure is invalid under said act. Sold for Mr. Bernard Donahue 

Witness. John E. FENTON, Esquire, the property at 7 Central street, 

Winchester to Mr. Robert B. L. 



this nineteenth day of 
one thousand nine 



NIVERSITY 

UN 4 -4580 



NOW THMt" SATI'P.OAY 
Jane Powell - Ricardo M-mtalban 

I \\ (» \\ EKKS W ITU LO\ R 

Joseph Cotten - Linda Parncll 

TWO Fl.\<;S \\ KS'I 



Judge of said Court, 
December in the 
hundred and fifty 

John J. Butler. Register. 

de29-3t 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
EMM AN TELLE POLITANO also known 
as EMM AN! ELLA POLITANO. MARIA 
E. POLITANO and EMMANl ELE POLI- 
TANO of Winchester in said County, de- 
ceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court, praying that ANGELINA POLI- 
TANO of Winchester in said County, be 
appointed administratrix of said estate, 
Without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written appear- 
ance at said Court at Cambridge before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on the fifteenth day 
of January 1951, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat, Esquire, First 
Judge of Said Court, this eighteenth day of 
December in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty. 

John J. Butler, Register 
deS&ftt 



Sybil H. Holme-, Recorder, 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

.•sex. ss. 1'iobate Court. 



i HItDREN'S MnVlE 

Sat . Jan. 1st. 1" V M 

I \\ I 1 I I VGS W KS'I 

l.l M il l? I hlllM, 

A Sportlight 
"Pirates of the High Seas" No. 9 
Sun.. Mon . Toes.. Wed . Jan. 14, 15, 16, II 
Deborah Kerr - Stewart (iranger 

MV; SOLOMONS MINES 

THE NEXT \OlCE 
YOl HE\K 



Thurv. Fri.. Sat.. Jan. IS, 19, 20 

Dana Andrews - Farley (iranger 
Joan Evans 

EDGE OF DOOM 



David Niven - Shirley Temple 

A KISS FOR CORLISS 

Continuous Daily from 1 :30 



STRUM 



WOburn 3-069* 



NOW THRU SATURDAY 
Due To Length Of Programme 
2 Complete Shows 1 :S0 - 7 :30 P. M. 

Thutn.. Kri., Sat . font. 
Voted The Best Picture Of 1950 
Bv N. Y. Critics 

ALL ABOUT EVE 

Bette Davis - Ann Baxter 

PRISONERS IN 
PETTICOATS 

Valentine Perkins - Robert Rockwell 

Sat at 1 :00 P. M. 
Special Children's Show 
Presenting 
I.anrel and Hardy 

THE FLYING DEUCES 

Plus Cartoons Reg Show Starts 
at 3 :30 Runs Continuous 

Sun . Mon , jRn 14. 15 
Mat. 1 .45 Eve. s HO font. 

I'LL GET BY 

Bill Landigan - June Haver 

DIAL 1119 

Mirshall Thompson 
Virginia Fi.W, 

Tues.. Wed., Jan. 16. 17 
Mat. 1 :45 Eve. 6:31) Cont. 

TWO FLAGS WEST 

Linda Darnell - Joseph Cotten 

STATE PENITENTIARY 

Warner Baxter - Onslow Stevens 



( OMMONWl; M I II OF 
MASSAI II I SKITS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons who are or may become 
interested and to all persons whose issue 
not now in being may become interested In 
the trust estate under the will of II. 
IRTHl'R HALL late of Winchester in 
said County, deceased, for the benefit of 
M \l 1) J. HALL and OTHERS. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court by the trustees of said estate for au- 
thority to sell, at private sale, certain per- 
sonal estate held by them as such trustees. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney shou'd file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the twenty- 
fourth day of January 1951, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this fifteenth day of 
December in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty. 

John J. Butler. Register. 

de29-8t 



STAR ADS 



BRING RESULTS 



□l T .T;Tt~i75 
SggQ FWnMRnlND-WI6 Z500| 



SEE 2 FEATURES LATE AS 8 V. M. 
TODAY THRU SATURDAY 

MAT 1:30 EVE. CONT FROM 6:15 

Bettv Hutton - Howard Keel 

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

Color By TECHNICOLOR 
PLUS 

Deborah Kerr - Robert Walker 

PLEASE BELIEVE ME 

Mark Stevens - Peter Lawford 



NOTE ! EVERY SAT. MAT ! 
Full Length Western Feature 
plus "Pirates of High Seas" 

IN ADDITION TO REGULAR 
2 FEATURES! 



SUN. - MON. - TUES. 
Jan. 14. 15. 16 
Greer Garson - Walter Pidgeon 

THE MINIVER STORY 

- And - 
Hedy I.amnrr - John Hrvt.ak 

LADY WITHOUT PASSPORT 



COMINC, 4 DAYS! 
WED THRU SAT 
Jan. 17 - 20 
Dorothy McGuire - Burt Lancaster 

MISTER 880 

Robert Walker - Joan Leslie 

SKIPPER SURPRISED 
HIS WIFE 




NOW ENDS SATURDAY 

Burt Lancaster 
Dorothy McGuire 
Edmund (iwenn 
in 

MISTER 880 

and 

FAREWELL TO 
YESTERDAY 

NEXT SUN.. MON.. TUES. 

Gloria De Haven 
Denni> Day 
Harrv Janus 
in 

I'LL GET BY 

r ilmed in lechnicolor 
and 
Vera Hal-ton 
in 

SURRENDER 



NOW ENDS SATURDAY 
Tyrone Tower 
in 

AMERICAN 
GUERRILLA 

IN THE 
PHILIPPINES 

and 

HI-JACKED 

NEXT SUN.. MON., TUES, 
Mala Powers 
in 

OUTRAGE 

and 

Edmund O'Brien 
Wanda Hendrix 
in 

THE ADMIRAL 
WAS A LADY 



KODAK 

Meigs and Miss Marian Clarke. «KRK l\wVltI\ 

Table decorations of silver and 
white drew many admiring: com- 
ments. Mrs. Clifton S. Hall and 
Mrs. William E. Priest served as 
pourers. 

Mrs. Long, President of the Win- 
chester League of Women Voters, 
introduced the speaker, .Mrs. Ivor 
\. Richards, who spoke on "Life in 
day". Mis. Richards and 
land, Prof. Richards of 
Harvard University, were in China 
from April to August 1950, as 
quests of Yeuohinjr University in 
Peking, Prof, and Mrs. Richards. 

first went to China in 1927 and ! per roll; negatives, 2 t ' i x2\' t . Camera, with hodet Lens, ?l.i.9>; with 
spent five years teaching in Univer- i Kodar f/S lens, $21.95. Flasholder for both models, $3,33. Price- in- 
County, praying that they be appointed ex- the house at 25 Stowell road, Win- 1 sities in various narts of China 1 i j t- j it 

ecutors thereof, without giving a surety on ..I..,.,,,,. ,,, \ fl . fhail.w T Fichor . i 1 a elude 1" ederal lax. 

their homis. cnestei to air. inants i . tusner, They returned a train and lived 

if \,.u desire to object thereto sou or Moline, Illinois. there for many years. The speak- 

Sold for Mrs. Helen K. Young e r. therefore, was well equipped to 

the property at^l KemhvMrth roail, ; [,ive first hand information on 

' China's past and present life of the 



Singer, Winchester. 

Sold for Mr. W. Henry Johnston 1 . 
the property at 197 Mystic Valley china I 

her bus 



Middlesex, ms. Probate Court. Parkway, Winchester to Mr. Eric 

To all persons Interested in the estate of Rvd of Newton, Mass. 
FLORENCE W. HITLER lute .,f Win- "o , i f(1 .. Frederick A Sim 

cheater in said County, deceased. ® ola ' ni ' V S ^- 

A petition hns been presented to mill : mons the property at 15 Fletcher 
Court f.u probate of a certain instrument street, Winchester to Mr. Francis 

purport,,,* to be the last will of said de- jj Xhomas of Winchester. 

Sold for Mr. Edward M. James 



ceased by tHARI.ES W. HITLER and 
HA ZEN II. AVER of Winchester in paid 




DUAFLEX II 



CAMERAS 



Stop in and let us show you how easy it is to take good picture- 
outdoors or indoors ... in color or black-and-white. You get 12 -hots 



Winchester to Mr. John L Keliher 
of Taunton, Mass. 

Sold for Mr. Ralph T. Jope the 



your attorney should file a written ap- 
l-rariince in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ti n o'clock in the forenoon on the 
twenty-third day of January 1951, the re- 
turn day of this citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat, Esquire. First 
Judge of said Court, this third day of 

January in the year one tie. sand nine propei'tv at 7 Chester:- -I'd road, 
hundred and fifty-one. .Winchester to Mr. Everett M. 

John J, Butler. Ueuistcr. , , « , r> i 

jan:,-3t Schenk of ( ranston, R. 1. 

Sold for Mr. Addison I:. Pike the 
' °M^SSACHr SETTS OF property at * Stratford road, Win- 

Middlesex, ss. " ' Prebate Court, chester to Mr. Jacob Scott Friou 

To ai persons interested in the .state of of Washington, D. C. 
DOKAMI II. IlERHIDlil-: lute of Wine' 



Sold the property at 12 Wedge- 
mere avenue, Winchester to Mr. 
Albert How,- of Raldwin. X. Y. 

Sold for Mr. Marcus I!. Water, 
man the property at 37 Salisbury 
street, Winchester to Mrs. Chester 
Hliss, Wakefield, Mass. 

Sold for Mr. Edmund < olgan the 
property at -18 Samoset road to Mr. 
" witness! a j''bn C. Leggat, Esquire, First Hichmond Page, of New York. 
Judge of sai-l Court, this fourth -lay of N>ld for Mr. John W. White the 
January in . the year one thousand nine nttn. property at 49 Yale street, Win- 

" '"'T.hn J Butler, Register. M"*^ to . «&. ™«™»« '' Hiviney 

j«nl2-3t ' ot Spnngheld, Mass. 



ter in sai-l County, deceased. 

A pet, -ion I... i, pt'tai nted to sai-l 

Court, praying that MAUVROSE IV M-- 
DEVITT "f Winchester in said County, be 
appointed udrmnistrutri* "f sai-l estate, 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written appear, 
nnce in sai-l Court at Cambridge la-fore 
ter, o'clock in the forenoon on the twenty- 
ninth -lay of January ItiSI, the return day 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
PATRICK QUIGLE1 late of Winchester in 
said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court for probate of a certain instrument 
purporting to be the Inst will of said de- 
ceased by PHILIP P. DEVER of Woburn 
in said County, praying that he be ap- 
pointed executor thereof. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in saiil Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
thirty-first day of January 1951, the re- 
turn day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat. Esquire. First 
Judge of snid Court, this fifth day of 
January in the yenr one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Butler, Register. 

jnnU'-Ht 



Miss Rosemarie J. Vezina of 
Hartford, Conn., a senior at Bouve- 
Boston School of Physical Educa- 
tion, Medford, has returned to her 
practice teaching at the Winchester 
High School after the Christmas 
holidays. 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
CHARLES H. DAVIS, late of Winchester 
in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court for probate of a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will of snid de- 
cesseil bv IJERTRI DE I.. DAVIS of Win- 
chester in snid County, praying that she he 
appointed executrix thereof, without giv- 
ing a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in snid Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
thirtieth ilav of January 1951, the return 
-lay of this citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat. Esquire. First 
Judge of sai-l Court, this eighth day of 
January in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Rutler. Register, 

janl2-3t 



Report of a Holding Company Affiliate 
of a Bank Which Is a Member of the 
Federal Reserve System, Published 
in Accordance with the Provi- 
sions of the Federal Reserve 

Report as of December HO, 1950. of Bny- 
state Corporation, Boston, Massachusetts 
which is affiliated with Winchester Trust 
Company. Winchester, Massachusetts. 

Kind of Business: Holding Company. 

Manner in which above-named organi- 
zation is affiliated with member bank, 
anil degree of control : The Haystate Cor- 
poration owns 10.200 shares of stock of 
the Winchester Trust Co., equnl to 51 r J. 

Financial relations with bank: 
Stock of affiliated bank own- 



people. 

Mrs. Richards described the 
changes that have taken place in j 
the life of the Chinese people under 
Communist rule. The traditional 
costume of embroidered silk and 
satin often worn with jade earring* 
has been replaced by shabby blue 
and grey cotton dresses cut in uni- 
form style, topped by the invari- 
able cap worn on tin- back of the 
head covering the rumpled hair of 
: he party workers. They now have 
: no time or money to spend on 
clothes or appearance or culture. 
All effort is directed toward tin- 
advancement of the party. The 
whole concentration of their effoi-l 
; is to make cloth for simple clothes, 
soap for washinir, anil paper for 
paper-covered books which consist 
mostly of case histories of down- 
trodden people who by the help of 
their government have found a 
better life. 

Mrs. Richards spoke of the clever 
Communist propaganda with which 
the people have been indoctrinated 
and through which they have been 
led to believe that the South Ko- 
reans attacked the North Koreans, 
and that America planned to take 
Manchuria by aggression. Fantas- 
tic as it seems to us, many evi- 
dences proving this belief were 
seen in the trenches dug in Peking 
and windows boarded up against 
the expected American invasion. 
The speaker emphasized the Com- 
munist policy of recognizing the 
previously untapped strength of 
the Chinese women as workers in 
the party program. 

On the other hand there were im. 



Winchester (hmerq ^hop 

570 MAIN fl". • WI-6-0952 • WINCHESTER 



ideology was, Mrs. Richards said, 
most difficult to understand. How- 
ever, the Communist machine 
works thoroughly and persistently, 
and countless pictures of Stalin and 
Renin, together with the ever 
present teachings of Marxism are 
continually paraded before the 
people. 

Committee Vetivities 

The second morning meeting ar- 
ranged by the Education Commit- 
tee will be held on Monday, Jan- 
uary 29th, at in a. m. The speaker 
will" be from the Massachusetts 
Hospital S e h o o 1 for Crippled 
Children in Canton. Coffee and a 
social hour will precede the lecture 



network. 

The story of Law! 
"Build a Better Coi 
jeet which won a stal 



in, Oklahoma, 
munity" pro- 
■ sweepstakes 
Federation of 
:is lu-en selected as 
to be dramatized. 
I urn in it tee 
the fust meeting 
Fortnightly mom- 
were privileged to 



None 

None I 
None \ 

None 



provements noted too. One of the 

Loans to affiliated hank 

Borrowings from affiliated hank 
Stock of affiliate? registered in 
name of bank or known to 
be owned by bank directly 

or indirectly 

Other obligations to, or known 
to be held by. affiliated hank 
Other information necessary to 
disclose fully relations with 

bank 

1. Raymond F. Helslein, Treasurer of 
Bay-state Corporation, do solemnly Bwear 

that the above statement is true, to the streets reading a poster, whereas and Eleanor Stocking Seal- 



ed (par valuei . . . $102,000.00 

N""* startling things to the speaker was 
how much moral education the 
Chinese Communists have provided 
for their people, and how success- 
ful they have been in instituting 
reforms as well as the progress in 
combatting illiteracy among the 
poorer classes, so that now the ] 
Rick-Sha men mav be seen in the 



prize in tile Com 
Women's Clubs hi 
one of the stories 
Literature 
l »n January _'. 
of the New Year, 
bers and guest 

hear an excellent book review given 
by Miss Gertrude Hall on Frances 
W'inwai's biography of "The Im- 
mortal Lovers", Elizabeth Barrett 
and Robert Browning. 

The review was prefaced by a 
brief sketch of the biographer's 
and discussion. Details about the background. Frances Win war 
place of meeting, the speaker, etc., (Francesa Vinciquetra) born in 
will appear later in the Star. But Sicily, now a naturalized citizen of 
remember now to save the date, i America, novelist and biographer 
Januarv ''!>th since 10'JT, has many literary works 

Mrs.* L Stewart Chaffe, Chair- to her credit. Miss Winwar, being 
man of the War Veterans' Commit- a native of Italy was in a position 
tee, gave a report on the Christmas to become thoroughly familiar with 
Bags which were sent to the Chel. the historic background of the 
sea Naval Hospital. Mrs. Karl Brownings, who, during their mar- 
Bean gave the material and made ried life lived for the most part in 
the bags. Thev were then filled Florence, Italy, 
with useful and' attractive gifts. Miss Hall reviewed her subject in 

Members were reminded of the true literary style, her comments 
Federation Mid-Winter Meeting on and analyses particularly cogent 
February 28th, at John Hancock and entertaining. One was made 
Hall. Luncheon tickets mav be to feel at once the deep sense of 
obtained from Mrs. Marshall W. inspiration inevitably aroused by 
Symmes the life story and accomplishments 

Preservation of Antiques ?/ " The Immortal Rovers". Miss 

Information Morning. Thursday. 1Ia!1 ' to °- who w,th her slstor Mlaa 



January 18, at 11:00 a. m., 28 New 
bury street, Boston. 

Subjects: "Early A m e r i c a n 
Homes and how to furnish them". 
"Homespun and Harmony" 
Speakers: Enid Louise Fairbairn 



Grace Hall, spent several months 
in Europe during the past year, 
was able to share with her audience 
some interesting over-seas expe- 
riences one of which was a visit 
to the city of Florence, Italy. 



best of my knowledge and belief. 

RAYMOND F. HEISLEIN 
Sworn to and subscribed aefore me thii 
fifth day of January, 1951 



before none of these people could 
read. 

How a people who for centuries 



"Sweepstakes Prize Contest" 
News 

Listen in to the "People Act" 



I Seal , 



.iohn M. EUSTIS^ pubii( _ had f„i] rtwer i ^e teachings of Con- radio series on Saturday,' January 

fueius could accept the Communist 20, at 7:00 - 7:30 p. m„ over N. B. C. 



Report of Condition of the 

WINCHESTER TRUST COMPANY 

of Winchester. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, a State Banking Institution and member of the Federal Reserve System, at the close of business 

DECEMBER 31. 1950 

Published in accordance with a rail made hy the Commissioner of Banks pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 172, Sec. 2« of the General Laws, Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts and a rail by the Federal Reserve Bank of this district pursuant to the provisions of the Frderal Reserve Act. 



Assets 

Cash, clearing and ensh items in the process of collection $ 447.620.7X 

Italnnres with banks, including reserve balance S36.98S.S9 

V. S. Government obligations, direct and fully guaranteed 2.707.500.25 

Obligations of States and political subdivisions 197.574.19 

Other bonis, notes and debentures 77.091.74 

Corporate stock, including 110.050.00 stock of Federal Reserve Ilank l--.05n.00 

Loans and discounts . 4,337,779,81 

Overdrafts . 201.46 

Banking house $16,691.62 Fur and Fix. $20,166.78 36.S58.40 

Other assets, including current accruals J16.109.76 17.801.21 



16.469.463.2'i 



Liabilities 

Demand deposit* of individuals, partnerships and corporations $3,325,644.15 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships and corporations sR.5no.nn 

Savings department deposits, including club accounts $6,601.50 1,601,266.20 

Deposits of U. S. Government, including Postal Savings $1,684.37 95.019.56 

Deposits of States and Political subdivisions 431 ,m-i,h sr, 

Deposits of hanks 121,301.29 

Other deposits icertified. officers' checks, etc. i 230,871.24 



SON OF FOR MRU 
WINCHESTER GIRL BADLY 
BURNED 

T h e condition of little Peter 
Hankart who was severely burned 
at his home last week is slightly 
improved. He is the son of Mar- 
guerite Merrill Bankart who for- 
merly lived in Rangely. 

Contrary to report his mother 
was not away from home when the 
accident occurred, hut had gone 
into the clothes yard and Peter 
leaned over the stove to watch her, 
his sweater becoming ignited. 

The quick action of his sister 
Carol prevented a more serious 
tragedy. 

He was rushed to the Arlington 
Hospital by his mother and a kind 
neighbor. 



Other tiabilitie 



Total Deposits $6,891,(01.29 
including current accruals $25,437.58 . . 



63.s52.41 



dace Anne Padelford, daugh- 
ter of Dr. and Mrs. Norman J. 
Padelford, Itavenscroft road, is 
among the 65 members of the 
Basic Philosophic and Relig-ious 
— | Ideas class at I ten i son University, 

T-.tai Liabilities $5,954,853.70 Craiiville, Ohio, that visited Tempie 

. Israel in Columbus, January ~> for 

„ a social hour and discussion "f 

( .pit.i Accounts modern Judaism. The trip is re- 

Common stock Par Value 2oo.ooo.oo '. quired as part ,.f the interfaith 

fund '::::;:::::;::::;:::::;:::;::::;:::;::;:::::::::;::: x Wmm studies in the course - 



(oiaranty 
Undivided profits 
Kcserve* 



65,258.14 : 
37,351.39 



Total Capital Accounts % 514,609.53 

Total Liabilities and Capita! Accounts $6,469,463.23 



Savings Department 

Assets and liabilities of this department are included in the above statement. These assets are segregated and set apart hy law for the protection of Savings 
Department Depositors, 



Assets 

I Balances with hanks . . 

I'. S Government obligations, direct and fully s'-"~"''^ i 
' Loans on real estate 

Loans on personal security 

Other assets, including current accruals $5,200.76 




Total 



30.567.99 
790.007.49 
845,759.02 

25.000.00 
5.200.76 

$1,696,535.26 



Liabilities 

Deposits, including club accounts $6.-i01.50 

Other liabilities, including current accruals $3,319.42 

Guaranty fund 

Profit and loss, including net current period earnings 



$1,601,266.20 
14.972.50 
77.000.00 
3,296.56 



Tot »- $1,696,535.26 



Memoranda 



Assets pleged t,< secure leposits of savings department in the commercial department 
Assets pledged or assigns*! to sec .re other liabilities and for other purposes 



Amount -if 

liability 
$ 23.941.42 



Book Value >>f 
assets pledged 
$ 74,650..;! 
326,066. »n 



The foregoing statements 
penury. 



re true, accurate and complete to the best of our knowledge and beief. and are made and subscribe.! to under the i-enalties 



of 



William L. Parsons. President 
Davenport F. Da. is. Clerk 
Da.enp.-rt F Davis. Trea,urer 
Ernvst H Da ie. Director 



Nicholas H. Fitzgerald. Director 
Horace H. Ford, Director 
Harris S. Richardson, Director 
C.rtis W. Na»h. Director 



TOWN OF WINCHESTER 

WARRANT FOR TOWN 
j MEETING 

| ORDERED: That the war- 

j rant for the Annual Repre- 

f -entative Town Meeting to 

| be held in March 1951 be 

i closed at 4;30 -/clock P. M. 

' on Monday, January 2!', 1951 

| and 'hat public notice thereof 

• be given by publication of 
this order in the three ($) 

I consecutive issues -if the 

j "Winchester Star'' preceding 

| -aid dat.-. 

. Vincent Farnsworth, Jr. 

' Harry K. Chefalo 

| Richard C. Cunningham 

• Nicholas H. Fitzgerald 
Harrison V. Lyman, Jr. 

Selectmen of Winchester 

! 



10 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 12. 1951 



PUT YOUR MONEY TO WORK 
FOR YOU SAFELY AT A BETTER RETURN 

INVEST IN PAID-UP SHARES 

CURRENT EARNINGS 

'270 

Per annum 

Shares INSURED in full 
under Massachusetts 
Law 




j J Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



i 



LISTINGS WANTED 

We have customers in all price brackets waiting 
for houses — particularly three and four bedrooms 
with two baths. 



RUTH C. PORTER Realtor 

33 THOMPSON STREET 

Winchester 6-1310 Evenings, Winchester fi-2:?l« — fi-'ilti-; 




WINCHESTER HOMES 

Charming Colonial Home — Eight sunny rooms — two baths. 
Oil Heat. Garage, Spacious yet compact. Delightful screened 
porch for summer living. Convenient location. 

VERNON W. JONES 

REAL ESTATE 
Twenty-sixth Year in W inchester 
I National Hank Building Winchester 6-089S or 6-116.1 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 




WINCHESTER 6-0035 
VINE AND ELM WOOD AVE. 
WINCHESTER 



FOR SALE 

Ranch house of seven rooms in excellent location. Oil heat 
Garage. $19,000. 

Seven room Colonial in Mys:ie School section. Oil heat. 
Garage. $18,500, 

Office space to rent near center. 

FESSENDEN 

KATHRYN P. SILLIVAN. Realtor 
3 COnmion Street 
Winchester 6-09> I— — 6-21 37-R— 6-34.'< 4—6-13 18 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



| F.C. Rivinius&Co. 

! INSURANCE 



FOR SALE 



19 CHURCH STREET, WINCHESTER 

• Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



WINCHESTER Mystic School section, 7- 
rOOTM colonial, tiled bath, J-car garage. Price 
$18,500, 

STONEHAM Wonderful home for growing 
family, best location, convenient to all services, 7 
rooms, 2 baths, fust floor lavatory, 2-car garage, 
playroom, % acre lot, tennis court Beautiful and 

G. A. J0SEPHS0N - Real Estate 

5 Church Street (Star Building) 
Tel. Winchester 6-2426 Evenings, Winchester 6-1817-M 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



148 State Si. 
Boston, Ma>«*. 
LA 3-5730 



l"» Church St. 
Winchester 
WI 6-H2fi* 



WEST SIDE 

Exceptionally well-built and well planned Ranch home. 
Cabinet kitchen, cheerful dining room with bay window, extra 
large living room with picture window ami fireplace. Center hall, 
3 twin-size bedrooms, large closets, tile bath and shower H. W.' 
oil heat. Two-car attached garage. Large lot of land Vskimr 
$23,500. 

MURRAY & GILLETT, Realtors 

1 Thompson Street 

Winchester «-2.">60 Eves. W inchester 6.1992. 6-2621. 6-2313 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



I 



Anne Rivinius \\ ilri, Broker 

ma'3-tf 




INSURE 
AGAINST FIRS 



Luther W. Puffer, 
Jr., Inc. 

557 Main Street 

Winchester 
Winchester 6-1980 

Join THE MARCH OF 
DIMES 



JOHN B. MERCURIO 

1 Mt, Vernon Street 
Insurance and Heal Estate 
Tel. Winchester 6.3400 



EAST SIDE 

House in perfect condition. Four bedrooms two baths on 
second floor. Reduced for Quick Sale $21,000 

WEST SIDE 

Wonderful income property. House in perfect condition 
Approved new OP A Rents. 

Consult Us on Mortgage Money and all Types of 

SOPHIE BOWMAN 

45 Church Street 
Winchester fi-2.">7."> — 6-0791 (days) 
W inchester 6-327S — 6-1966 evenings arid Sunduvs 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



NEWSY PAR U.KAPHS 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



For Fuel Oil. Phone Fitzgerald 
Fuel Co., Winchester 6-3000. 

o5-tf 

Patsy Brown, (Mrs. Bill Brown) 
is now associated with John Robert 
Powers School of Newbury street, 
Boston. 

Verne J, Slack of 32 Lebanon 
street, has received his freshman 
numeral award for participation 
in freshman football at Springfield 
College during the 1950 season. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Moynahan of 
Wildwood street are spending the 
winter months at Fort Pierce. 
Florida. 

For experienced service or re- 
pairs on all makes of sewing 
machines or vacuum cleaners, call 
E. W. Clark, Winchester 6- 
0140-W. augl4-tf 



Winton Club Show, "Here We Co 
Again," Hurry! hurry! Tickets for 
Fridaj night, January 2t>, still 
available. Saturday sold out. Send 
reservations with check now! Mrs. 
Frank C. d'Elseaux, 12 Sheffield 
road. 

Last Saturday morning Officer 
Thomas llannon discovered a leak- 
in one of the big water mains on 
Main street near the home of Dr. 
A. L. Maietta. Superintendent 
James Halwartz of the Water De- 
partment was notified and his re- 
pair crews repaired the damage. 

For information and reservations 
call your Authorized Travel Agent, 
J. F. McGrath, Jr., Travel Service, 
14 Eaton avenue, Woburn. Tele- 
phone: WOburn 2-1234. - Winches- 
ter 6-3130. jan5-2t 



THE BIG WIND 

BROUGHT 5100,000,000 IN LOSSES 



I lie National Hoard of Fire I nderwriters now estimates 
thai the windstorm of November 23. 19.10 will cosl the Stock 
Fire Insurance Companies one hundred million dollars. 

Even today, a month and a hall later, all available ad- 
justers, many of whom were called from other parts of the 
Country, are working days, nights ami Sundays in order to 
serve all who have suffered damage. 

The Companies which I represent authorized me to 
adjust my customers* losses in order to facilitate settlements. 

I wish to thank my many "w inchester assureds as well as 
all of my other customers who suffered damage, for their 
patience and cooperation: the harassed carpenters, roofers 
and general helpers for their prompt response for aid. and. 
finally, my companies w hose lo«- departments have worked 
hundreds of overtime hour-. 

If anyone, customer or not. does not understand either 
tin- "$50.00 Deductible Clause" or what "Depreciation" 
means. Please call me or my associate. Richard P. Nyquist. 

CHARLES HADLEV WATKINS 

112 Water Street. Boston 
LA 3-5700 



WATKINS RESIDENCE 
2 Kidfcefield Road 
Winchester 6-03T0 



NYQUST RESIDENCE 
29 Cray. son Road 
WIneheMer 6-0147 



1st 



MOolAOiAM ORIEN TAL Ouj CO 
fr" M '-HI' H \ W~ 



ZA 



J L 



rT. 



Li. 



EXPANDED 

To give you even 
Better Service 

Our ne*. large and efficient 
Rug Cleaning plant for 
Cleaning. Repairing and 
Storing of your rugs. 



INSTITUTED 

to serve you on ill 
your rugs needs 
Call 

Winchester 6-0654 
34 Church Street 




- MOURADIAN - 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 

Winton Club Show, "Hen- We Co 
Again," Hurry! hurry! Tickets for 
Friday night) January 26, still 
available, Saturday sold out. Send 
reservations with cheek now! Mrs. 
Frank C. d'Elseaux, 12 Sheffield 
road. 

Mr. David Prescott Frizzell, son 
of Mr. and Mis. William A. Frizzell, 
154 Church street, left Boston on 
January 2nd for basic training at 
Lockland Ait Base, San Antonio, 
Texas. David graduated from Win- 
chester High School in 1!»4!>. Prior 
to his enlistment he was with the 
State Street Trust Company, Bos- 
ton, for a year and a half. 

The oil painting of the Station 
of the Cross, presented to St. 
Mary's Church by the People of 
Hemroulle, Belgium, last Sunday, 
has been framed by the Pastor, 
Rev. Fr. John P. O'Riordan, and 
hung in a conspicuous place in the 
lower church, which is open at all 
times. 

Call Ed Lynch for prompt re- 
moval of rubbish. Winchester 6- 
3516. slO-tf 

Three windows were broken in a 
Plymouth sedan, owned by Ronzio 
Lueondoni of 72 Swanton street, 
while it was parked in front of 
Christopher Columbus Hall last 
Friday evening. The Police were 
notified. 

A collection of the latest style 
hats for all occasions at Miss 
Kkman's, 15 Church street. Also 
tweed hats made. s8-tf 

Mis. Otis W. Leary, wife of the 
director of Shopvvork at Winches- 
ter High School, underwent a 
major operation at the Winchester 
Hospital on Wednesday. Her post- 
operative condition was reported 
as very satisfactory. 

Mary Von's Candy now for sale 
at Sophie Bowman's Office, 45 
Church street. jal2-tf 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Leary of 
Somerville are the parents of a 
daughter, Wendy Patricia, born 
New Year's Day at the Winchester 
Hospital. Mrs. Leary is the for- 
mer Jean Yates, daughter of Dr. 
and Mis. James Yates of 368 Lees 
load, Oldham, England. The pa- 
ternal grandparents are Mr. and 
Mrs. Otis W. Leary of Farrow 
street. 

Tax Commissioner Henry F. 
Long has assigned a deputy to take 
tax returns at the General Com- 
mittee Room at the town hall on 
February G, from 9:30 a. m. to 1 
p. m., and from 2 p. m. to 4 p. m. 

dec22-tf 



MRS. JOSEPHINE HOVEY 
D WIS 

Mrs. Josephine Hovey Davis, 
wife of Benjamin R. Davis, of 85 
High street, died late Monday 
night, January 8, after a long ill- 
ness. 

Mrs. Davis was born in Stone- 
ham, September 10, 1877, the 
daughter of Warren N'.. and Ida 
Josephine I Hovey ) James. As a 
young girl she lived in Stoneham, 
receiving her early education in the 
Stoneham schools. Later her par- 
ents moved to Somerville and she 
was graduated from Somerville 
High School, also being married in 
Somerville July 21, 1!M)(>. She had 
lived in Winchester for the past 
20 years. 

Mrs. Davis leaves, besides her 
husband, a daughter, Mrs. Frank 
Kbens of Winchester; two sons, 
Harvey, of Stoneham; and Richard 
M. Davis of Melrose; seven grand- 
children and four great-grandchil- 
dren. 

Funeral services were held 
Thursday afternoon at the Kim- 
ball Chapel with Rev. Dwight W. 
Hadley, rector of the Church of the 
Kpiphany, officiating. Interment 
was in Wildwood Cemeterv. 



RKSIDE.N( E nnrt Al'TOMOBILE 
FIRE and I I ABILITY 

INSURANCE 

IHrert l ocal Aj[rnt — Strung 
Companies 
W. \LLAN WILDE 

3 Thompson St. Winchester 6-1400 

dec29-tf 




r-ormeny (..M.fauci CO. *mM 
139 Myitic Av«,Mcdford 

^g *: Plenty of Free Parking. Open 9ojnto 11 pjrT™ 

Free dclivry.MV»tic 6-510? 




WILLIAM $. WOLSEY 

Builder 

Winchester 6-1336 



myl2-tf 



See your Eye Physician 
and 

-Arlkur ~K. -Smith 
CjtufJ Optician 

126 Main St. Tel. WOburn 2-1704 

mal3-tf 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 
January 15-31 



Volunteers needed for 



OPERATION PORCHLIGHT 



THE MOTHERS' MARCH 



on 



POLIO 



FROM 7 TO 8 P. M. WEDNESDAY 
JANUARY 31. 1951 

CALL MOTHERS' MARCH CHAIRMAN 
MRS. FRANK CARLETON 
WI 6-1584 

WINCHESTER MARCH OF DIMES COMMITTEE 




Tel. Winchester 6-1271 



Res. Winchester 6-3388- W 



FREDS HOME SERVICE 

\ complete home maintenance ncrviee 
for your convenience. 

Km- your comfort and relaxation, new wallpaper or a sol'i 
pastel color paint will make a big difference in your home. 

Call us for an estimate 

We do any job around the home — none too larae or loo small. 

jnnl'J-tf 



CHAS. C. NICHOLSON 

— BUILDER — 

BUILDING -- REMODELING — REPAIRING 
ROOFING — SIDEWALLS 

New Homes Built to Your Specifications 

42 Union St. Tel. WOburn 2-0609 Woburn 



31 Years Experience 



Jt'J-HOW 



; nun 

' 1 



BACK IN BUSINESS 



AFTER FIRE 

TO SERVE YOL'R REAL ESTATE 

and 

INSURANCE NEEDS 
Hundreds of Buyers Looking Eor Homes 

CALL US 

And List Your Property For Sale or Rent 

OFFICES and STORE FOR RENT 

P. T. FOLEY & CO 

REALTORS AND INSURANCE 

2 MT. VERNON STREET 



WI 6-1492 




THE ORLAND HOUSE 

.112 Forest Street. Maiden 
\f HSiM, HOME 



OPEN HOUSE ON 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, January 11, 12, 13 from LOO 
to 10:00 p ,m The puhlic is cordially invited. 



Director 

Edna M. Brawn 
Stoneham 6-1762 



Managers 
Orland K- Fannv Colbome 
MAlden 4-2090 



Kelley and Hawes Co. 

Established 1877 

Packers and Movers 

-: STORAGE :- 

SEMI- WEEKLY TRIPS 
MAINE, NEW HAMPSHIRE, CONNECTICUT, 
NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA, WASHINGTON. 

MAIN OFE1CE 
5 PARK STREET, WINCHESTER 

Winchester 6-1477 

Formerly Winchester 6-0174 

CHAIRS and TABLES 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
BONDED AND INSURED CARRIERS 



PUBLIC LIBRARY, 

VIKCfftftft, 



THE WINCHESTER STAR. 



VOL. LXX NO. 22 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY. JANUARY 19. 1951 



PRICE TEN CENTS 




•WINCHESTER REMEMBERS 



Pastors of Winchester display 
School Auditorium Sunday aftemo 



he Pictures 
n. January 



absent their Churches by Hemroulle, Belgium, at the Reception Ceremony held at the High 



F rom left to riuht the Pastors are: 

Church; Rev. Dwight W. Hadley, Church 



lev. Howard J. Chidley, D. D., First Congregational Church; Rev. Virgess Hill, New Hope Baptist 
* the Epiphany; Rev. John Snook, Jr., Crawford Memorial Methodist Church; Mr, Edward R 
Simpson, First Church of< hrist Scientist; Charles ft. Gallagher, representing Rev. Berbers K. A. Driscoll, Immaculate Conception Church ; 

» Riordan, St. Marys Church; Rev. Walter Lee Bailey, First Baptist Church; Rev. John William Cook, Second Congregational 
I nitarian (lunch. Others in the picture, left to right, arc Major Samuel L, Hiebert, Chaplain, First 
Kenneth R. I„ye, Committee member; Mrs. Albert Nuvez, wife of Belgian Consul for New England- 
and ( ol. Leo A, Bessett, < ornmanding Officer, Massachusetts Military District. 



gi een taff 
matching he 
maids wore 
material in 
with headdr 
iridal attendant 
bouquets, 

Francis J. Rowe, , 
cousin of the bridegrt 
man, and a cousin < 
groom, Richard T, 1. 
1 torchester, ushered, 



r. of Bo-ton, 
mm, was best 
i f the bride- 
tndsdowne of 
with Bennett 



Rev. John 1' 

''hutch and Rev. Robert A. Storer, 
Service Command, Army Base, Boston; 



Pictures show n are "Stations of the Cross", taken from Hemroul 
American Eagle and Stars representing the States of the I'nion as 
her", referring to the aid lent Bastogne by the United States du 



• Chapel. Above pastor! 
parts of the new design. 



are new Bastogne Coats-of-Arni 
Above the Stais ale the wor'' 



Father Driscoll was not seated with the other pastors, being lat 
ime to accept his Parish's painting from Dr. Navez. 



m time 

ANSI AL MEETING OF 
WINCHESTER TRUST 
COMPANY 

The annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of the Winchester Trust 
Company was held in the Church 
Street office Tuesday afternoon. 

In a report to the stockholders 
the President referred to tin- year 
1950 as one of satisfactory growth. 
He stated that the total assets of 
the bank on December 31 were $6,- 
584,000, representing a gain of 15' , 
during the year, the total deposits 
$5,914,000, a gain of 16%, and the 
total capital accounts $514,600, a 
gain ^ of C , . He said that the 
bank's resources, deposits and capi- 
tal accounts were now substantially 
higher than at any previous time 
in its history. 

The following directors were re- 
elected : 

Ernest B. Dade 

James F. Dwinell, Jr. 

Nicholas H. Fitzgerald 

Horace H. Ford 

Robert J. Holmes 

Curtis W. Nash 

William L. Parsons 

Harris S. Richardson 

Henry K. Spencer 

The following officers were also 
re-elected; 

William L. Parsons. President 

Harris S. Richardson. Vice-Presi- 
dent 

Curtis W. Nash, Vice-President 
Davenport F. Davis, Treasurer 
Vincent C. Ambrose, Assistant 
Treasurer 



ring and since World War II. 

at the hall because of an emergency call for 



ith the 
.emem- 



Wightman of Woburti. 

After their journey Mr. and Mrs 
Bowes will live in Rrookline. 

The bride is a graduate of tin 
Katharine Gibbs School. Mr. Bowes 
graduated from Wilbraham Acad- 
emy, Babson Institute and the New 
England Aircraft School. 



services. He arrived 



KELLIHER _ FERN 



Mi. John A. 
named Chairman 
Red ( ress Chap., 
campaign for 1951. 
ihan Lewis K. Moore 
Volpe's appointment 
drive will he concent 
i n Red Cross Sunday 
Winchester Trust 
Church street will s 
center that day. Mr. 
assisted l>y a Fund Planning Com- 
mittee, whose members are: Miss 
Helen Monroe, Mrs. Ruth Hilton. 
Mrs. George Dotting, Mr. Wayne 
Davis, and Mr. Charles B. Watson. 
The house-to-house canvass will 
' also seek to enroll adults w ho would 
like to participate in the Chapter's 
blood donor program. Precinct 



has been 
Winchester 
i fund raising 
hapter Chair- 
announeod Mr. 
this week. The 
rated this year 
'. March 4. The 
Co. office on 
erve as report 
Volpo is being 



1 



Art Roem. Lecture 
"New Kuglaml 
- by i, 1. 



rbel 



I' 



ni. 



. w'lntiM" nuvt- 
Lilu'aiy. Slicak- 
\i lintfttm, 
Eniflan l. 
m. - Wiii- 



EDWARI) FLEMING 



CIVIL DEFENSE SCHOOL 



Edward Fleming, a former well 
known resident of Winchester, died 
Tuesday, January 16, at Parkches- 
ter General Hospital in the Bronx. 
N. V. He had been living in New 
York for the past two years with a 
nephew, Peter Fleming. 

Mr. Fleming was horn 85 years 
ago in Ireland. He lived in Win- 
chester for many years on Pond 
street, being a farmer until his re- 
tirement several years ago. 

Mr. Fleming was a widower, his 
wife, the former Ellen J. Ryall hav- 
ing died August 22, 1946. Besides 
his nephew, he leaves three nieces, 
Mrs. Margaret Malloy of Woburn, 
Mrs. Alice Boyle of Winchester and 
Miss Elizabeth Fleming of Wal- 
tham. 

The funeral was held this Friday 
morning from the Lane Funeral 
Home with solemn requiem high 
mass celebrated at the Immaculate 
Conception Church. Interment was 
in Oak Grove Cemetery, Medford. 



A series of twelve-hour Civil 
Defense schools began this week 
and will be conducted at various 
points throughout the State during 
the next month tinder the sponsor- 
ship of the United States Army, 
the State Department of Education, 
the National Fire Protection Asso- 
ciation and the Civil Defense 
Agency of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. The purpose is to 
familiarize key civil defense per- 
sonnel with the proper technique 
in war-caused disasters. The 
Army conducts the major portion 
of the course. 

Those attending will then act as 
instructors in their respective com- 
munities. The school sessions for 
Region 5, of which Winchester is a 
part, are being held in the Gardner 
Auditorium, State House, Boston, 
yesterday and today. A group of 
twenty from the various units of 
the Winchester Civil Defense or- 
ganization are attending. 



TO SING WITH OD1KON 
SINGERS 

Mr. Thomas C. Drapeau. son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Drapeau of 
Winchester, will sing with Tufts 
College's Odikon Singers on next 
Sunday's (January 21 » broadcast of 
the radio concert series, "Songs 
from New England Colleges." The 
broadcast, sponsored by Monsanto 
Chemical Company, will be heard 
at 2:30 p. m. over NBC outlets in 
New England. Mr. Drapeau is a 
junior at Tufts College. 



NEW CANDIDATES 
ANNOUNCED 

Several new candidates for town 
office have taken out papers since 
the last issue of the Star, included 
being: 

Park Commissioner, George H. 
(iowdy. 

Planning Board, Harris S. Rich- 
ardson, William W. Davies, III. 

School Committee, Charles F. 
Jellison. 

Selectman, Don S. Greer. 

Commissioner of Trust Funds. 
Francis E. Smith. 



S \LL^ K.\Y ENG VGED 



NORM A N B. BROOKS 



Norman B. Brooks of 5 Inverness 
road, State accountant for the past 
15 years, died suddenly Wednesday, 
January 17, in the State Health De- 
partment office after suffering a 
heart attack. He complained of 
not feeling well about 1 1 o'clock in 
the forenoon and had left his of- 
fice in the Department of Corpora- 
tions and Taxation's division of ac- 
counts to visit Dr. Solomon Sivcr- 
sky in the health department. 

Mr. Brooks was the son of 
Charles, and Josephine (Sylvia I 
Brooks. He was born February 5, 
18!"!. in Nantucket, and was 
educated in the Nantucket schools 
and at Wentworth Institute, from 
which he was graduated in 1915. 
During World Wj£ I he served in 
France with tlte'TTeld Artillery: 

Always identified with the ac- 
counting field, Mr. Brooks had been 
an accountant for Houghton Mif- 
flin, publishers, before entering 
the State service. He had been a 
member of the American Legion, 
Veterans of For- 



program. 

Chairman, Captains, and canvass- 

At the Immaculate Conception * ls . wi " mept on Monday evening. 
Chui-ch in Maiden on Sunday after- ! Ft * ruarv f'>r a final briefing 
noon, January 1, Miss Barbara Thl> nation-wide 

of Mrs year's Red Cross 



the 



E ASTON MAINE "KING" 



Harry Easton, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Hairy M. Easton of Seneca 
road, was recently elected to reign 
as "King" over the annual Winter 
Carnival at University of Maine. 

Har ry, a former Winchester 
high athlete, played end on the 
Maine varsity eleven this fall and 
is a member of the junior class, 
majoring in Business Administra- 
tion. 



Prof, and Mrs. Harold Hooper 
Blanchard of Calumet road an- 
nounce the engagement of Mrs. 
Blanchard's daughter, Miss Sally 
Ray, to John Hurley Hoagland, Jr., 
son of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Hoag- 
land of Beacon street. Boston, for- 
merly of Louisville, Kentucky. 

Miss Ray, daughter of the late 
Willard Haynes Ray, attended the 
Brimmer and May School and was 
graduated from Smith College in 
the class of 1950. She made her 
debut in the season ol 1940 - 47. and 
is a member of both the Junior 
League and t.,e Vincent Club. 

Mr. Hoagland prepared at the 
Taft School and Noble and Green- 
wood School for Yale University, 
from which he will be graduated in 
June. He is a member of Delta 
Kappa Epsilon fraternity, of Ber- 
zelius and the Whiffenpoofs. 

Miss Ray has chosen June as the 
month for the marriage. 



and later of 
eign Wars. 

As a young man Mr. Brooks had 
lived in Somerville, and while there 
married the former Elsie Pelton. 
Later he lived for a time in Lex- 
ington, coming to Winchester from 
that town 21 years ago. He first 
lived on Woodside road before mov- 
ing to his late h.une on Inverness 
road. 

Surviving, besides his wife, aie 
two sons. Frank I'.. and Norman B. 
Brooks, Jr.. both of Winchester; a 
sister. Miss Mildred Brooks; and a 
brother, Charles F. Brooks, both 
of Belnmnt. 

Funeral services will be held this 
Friday afternoon at the Church of 
the Epiphany, with the rector. Rev. 
Dwight W. Hadley, officiating. In- 
terment will be in Wildwood Ceme- 
tery. 



SELECTIVE SERVICE 
NOTICE 

Winchester Registrants under Selective Service are reminded 
that it is their responsibility to keep their Local Selective Service 
Board advised of any change of address or change of personal cir- 
cumstances which might affect their classification. Communica- 
tions should be sent to Local Selective Service Board No. 21. City 
Hall. Medford. Mass. s29-tf 



ZONING COMMITTEE 
NAMED 




Moderator Philip p. Wadsworth 
has announced the membership of 
the Committee established at the 
recent special town meeting to 
study the possibility of amending 
the Zoning By-Law with regards to 
i kindergartens, nursery schools: 
Allen 0. Eaton, 34 Rangelev road 
Charles A. Hart, 3 Felsdale Close 
Mrs. Olive K. Miller, 25 Ridge- 
neld road. 

Harry L. Mueller, M. D.. 21 
W estland avenue. 

Mrs. Kathryn P. Sullivan, 105 
t am bridge street. 



CUB SCOUT WASTE PAPER 
COLLECTION 



The Committee and Cub Scouts 
of Pack 6 wish to thank the resi- 
dents of Precinct 3 for their fine 
cooperation in the paper drive con- 
ducted last Saturday. We tried to 
collect all the paper set out for the 
Cubs, but if we happened to miss 
some houses we assure you it was 
simply an oversight. Three large 
truck loads were collected and 
added $192.52 to the Pack treasury. 
The Committee also wishes to 
thank Mr. George Connor and Mr. 
Charles Ungerman for the loan of 
the trucks which made the collec- 
tion possible. 

The Committee. 
Pack 6 



Elizabeth Fern, daughtei * 
Gertrude J. Ballard of Washington, 
D. ('., formerly of Winchester, be- 
I came the bride of Daniel W. Kelli- 
her, son of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel 
Kelliher of Spring street, Medford. 
A reception followed the ceremony 
at the Hunt Club m Woburn. 

Given in marriage by her uncle, 
Guy Wilberger of Winchester, the 
bride wore a traditional gown of 
white satin brocade with a long 
train. Her delicate fingertip- 
length veil was caught to a satin 
headpiece embroidered with seed 
pearls and she carried a bouquet of 
white roses and valley lilies cen- 
tered with an orchid. 

Miss Edith M. Schofield of West 
Roxbury was maid of honor and 
I the bridesmaids were Miss Kathe- 
rine Kelliher of Medford, sister of 
the bridegroom; and the bride's 
eoustn, Miss Eva R. Whaley of 
Somerville. Miss Cynthia Ann 
Wilberger, of Winchester, another 
cousin of the bride, was junior 
bridesmaid. 

The honor maid and bridesmaids 
wore dresses of satin and taffeta 
and carried bouquets of harmoniz- 
ing roses. The maid of honor was 
gowned in aqua and the brides- 
maids in gold. The junior brides- 
maid wore a yellow satin frock. 

Stephen X. Welch of Medforc 
was Mr. Kelliher's best man and 
the ushers were William Whaley of 
Somerville, cousin of the bride, "and 
William Taylor of Washington, 

Mr. and Mis. Kelliher are spend- 
ing their honeymoon in Florida. 
During February they will take up 
residence at Fairview Beach, Va. 

The bride is a graduate of Med- 
ford High School. Mr. Kelliher, 
who is an employee of the Navy 
Department at Dahlgren, Va., 
graduated from Medford Voca- 
tional School. 



JOSEPH J. BECKER RECEIVES 
Ph. D. DEGREE 



Joseph J. Becker, a graduate of 
Winchester High School, Class of 
1940, son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto 
Becker of 9 Kenwin road, received 
a Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
from Harvard University, after 
having previously been awarded 
Degrees of Bachelor of Science, 
"Cum Laude" and Master of Arts 
by the same University. 

Joseph Becker was* married in 
1946 to Margaret Redmond Jones 
of Pueblo, Colorado, a graduate of 
Hellesley College. Thev have two 
children. John Robert, 2'- and 
Peter Joseph. 1% years of age. 
They are residing at 1125 Pheonix 
avenue. Schenectady. New York, 
where Dr. Becker is a Research 
Associate w ith the Genera! Electric 
Company 



logan for this 
Campaign is 
Mobilize for Defense". When the 
United Nations police action began 
last summer in South Korea, the 
possibility that the civilian popu- 
lation of the United States might 
be subjected to atomic warfare 
SO< ner than had been contemplated 
became apparent. The Civilian De- 
fense organization for the Second 
World War had been completely de- 
mobilized. Fortunately there' has 
alw ays been in readiness an organi- 
zation which can cope with such an 
emergency until a permanent civil 
defense unit can be developed. 
That is why the March fund drive 
will mobil ize the Red Cross for de- 
fense, to serve our expanding 
armed forces, to train millions in 
first aid, home nursing, and nurses' 
aide work, to procure large quanti- 
ties nf blood and stockpile plasma, 
and to recruit and train volunteers 
for disaster relief. 

John Volpo is well-qualified to 
direct the March campaign in Win- 
chester. He graduated from Went- 
worth Institute in 1930 and is now 
president of the Volpe Construction 
Co. He served in the Navy as a 
Lieutenant Commander in the last 
war. He is a director of the Win- 
chester National Bank and the 
Winchester Red Cross. Mr. Volpe 
1 is married and lives in Winchester. 

SHILLADY APPOINTED 

Robert A. Shillady. Jr., of n 
Orient street, has been appointed 
a member of the Committee on 
Meetings for the Massachusetts 
Society of Certified Public Ac- 
countants, according to an an- 
nouncement by Richard S. ( hani- 
berlain, President of that organiza- 
tion. 

In addition to his activity ;n the 
Massachusetts Society, Mr. Shil- 
lady is • also a member of the 
American Institute of Accountants, 
and of New England Chapter- In- 
stitute of Internal Auditors. He is 
also Treasurer of Box 52 Associa- 
tion, Inc. 



Windiest r Hist.ni.al S„ 
iliK in Am (ijillt.yv, l'ul,| 

Iti-v. Uuiviu-c I.. Uarl* 
with film*, en hifttWu-nl 
| February :.. Mundny. K:0 
• In stcr HiKh Scho.il Auditoi. , 
iMiun " A .nl.'-nvn.-,- . which wuy to Ma- 
li city':" for ,,|| i arenls, .sponsored by 
i Junior Hi^h AsMM-iateo. 

February 11, T.iesday - Wednamltt" 
NiRhl Club. Fir- 1 Congregational t'hurrt . 
"I'liuntry Dance an. I Sugar-Eat." 

Februtury ;>. Friday, U ;C0 a. til. - Ai t 
Slti'lj liroup. Wiucluster Cnllefci Club at 
\ ' ' Mimt'iun, Quimy Stiwt, Cambridge. 
I Special program, including French draw- 
ings and water i'u ur«. Optional tour,, in 
nft» i noon. 

March in. Sattrrday, 8:30 p. m. - Bow- 
doin College Med liehempxtern, Mctcalf 
Mall. Unitarian Chinch. Unitarian Couples" 
Club. 

HEART CAMPAIGN* 



An organizational meeting was 
1m Id Friday, January 12. 1951, at- 
tended by a large group of Win- 
chester residents to elect commit- 
tee chairmen for the 1951 Amer- 
ican Heart Association Campaign. 

Dr. Richard J. Clark of 21 Shef- 
field West was appointed Honorary 
Vice-Chairman. Mr. I.. J. Scott, 
Winchester National Bank - Treas- 
urer; Mrs. Charles Jellison, Ardley 
Place, Special Gifts Chairman; Mr. 
Otis Jason, 1 Myrtle street, Chair- 
man Plastic Hearts: Mr. Charles 
Jellison, Ardley Place, Business and 
Industry Chairman; Mrs. R. J. In- 
graham, IS Ardley Place, and Mrs. 
Robert C. Scott, :i Ardley Place, 
Special Events Chairmen: William 
Sullivan, Winchester National 
Bank, Publicity Chairman. 

The purpose of the Campaign is 
to band together men and women 
in the common effort to prevent and 
Control heart disease. The scope 
anil importance of the hea.t proh 
lem should be of concern to every 
thoughtful citizen. It is not com 
monly known that mortality from 
disease of the heart and blood ves- 
sels is three times greater than 
cancer, and 11 times that of ttibei - 
culosis. It is the leading cause of 
death in all age groups over 35 
years, and second only to accidents 
in t lie "i to 1 ;» age group. 

In order to control this ever 
growing menace of heart disease, 
more research is necessary. All 
but a small percentage of funds 
raised by this campaign will re- 
main in Winchester to be used to 
aid local victims of this dreaded 

disease. 

Several social functions are 
planned fur the month of February 
in aid this worthy cause, and will 
be announced at a later elate. Th" 
interest and cooperation evidenced 
by the Winchester townspeople 
forecast a successful campaign. 
"If you have a heart, help save a 
heart." 

WINCHESTER RESIDENT 
VPPOINTED 



W INCH ESTER IN Dl( T EES 

Local Draft Board No. 21 located 
at Room 9 at City Hall, Medford, 
has announced the following young 
men from Winchester to be induc- 
ted January 25: 

Donald R. Lynch, 4 Russell road. 

John W. Costello, 1* Border 
st reet, 

E. Flaherty, .'! Cedar 



Subscribe To The STAR 

Still $2.50 a Year 

Quite a Saving over the New 
Single Copy Price of 10c. 



\\ e deliver free! Save yourself money 
and the possibility of mis.-ing the copy 
you want most. 

WRITE - PHONE - DROP IN 

THE WINCHESTER STAR 

3 Church Street Tel. Winchester 0-0O29 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

FIRST AID CLASSES 

Civil Defense training teaches people how to perform the 
services needed before, during, and after an enemy attack. In 
conformity with our Civil Defense training program it is planned 
that all workers receive basic training in standard First Aid. 
Due to existing conditions and for the protection of our commu. 
nity should an emergency arise, it is essential that First Aid 
training be made available to the largest number possible. 



Classes in First Aid under the direction of Winchester Chap- 
ter, American Red Cross, are now being conducted. They are held 
one evening each week from 7:30 until 9:30 P. M. Those inteiested 
should communicate with the local office of the Red Cross, tele- 
phone Winchester 6-2300 or the Department of Civil Defense, 
telephone Winchester 6-3257. Both offices are in the Town Hall. 

James W. Blackham 
Director of Civil Defense 



NOMINATION 
PAPERS 




Nomination Papers for the 
nomination of candidates in- 
cluding To»n Meeting mem- 
bers, to be voted for on 
March 5, 1951, must be sub- 
mitted to the registrars of 
Voters for certification of 
signatures on same on or be- 
fore 5 o'clock on the after- 
noon of January 29, 1951. 

Howard S. Cosgrove 
George J. Barbara 
Harry J. Donovan 

Mabel W. Stinson 
Registrars of Voters 



Charles 
street. 

Leonard 
ter avenue. 

John M 
street. 

Richard 
bridge street. 

Alexander B. 
Highland avenue. 



A. Landry, 111 Sylves- 
. McKenzie, 52 Vine 
F. Brackett. 153 
Samoiloff, 



( !am- 



310 



Albert L. Fisher of 5 Edgehill 
mad, dean of the Fisher School of 
Business Management for Men, has- 
been named district governor for 
the New England and New York 
area by Dr. Jay Miller, president 
of Goldey College, Wilmington. 
Delaware, and head of the National 
Association and Council of Busi- 
ness Schools. 

Mr. Fisher if 
president of the 
Business College 
represented that 
annual meeting i 
organization in Cleveland, O., dur- 
ing the Christmas recess. Attend- 
ing the Ohio convention were 
representatives from most of tin 
600 business schools of the nation. 



immediate past 
New England 

Association and 
group at the 

if the national 



ENLISTMENT SITUATION 
AS OF MORNING 
JANUARY 18, 1951 

AIR FORCE: With the exception- ..f veteran- anil 
WAFS, enlistments are closed until further notice. 

I . S. AKM\ : Enlistments, assigned ami unassigned, are 
being accepted at the Medford Recruiting Station. Cilj 
Hull: also Officer Candidate School applications. 

I . S. \A\ \ : — Application- being accepted hut put on 
the waiting lift. 

HIGH SCHOOL BOiS: May i„ hool and get vour 
diploma*. 

MEN CI.VSSIK1EIJ 1-A: — Keep m touch with vour draft 
board and let the board know if vou have applied for 
OCS. HOC. or wme -iiuil.ir program. 

WINCHESTER MILI I \in 
\l \NPoW EK COMMITTEE. 
I*. I«\e. Chairman, 



2 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 19. 1951 




VlMtdSmm- Must be Listed 
on your 1950 INCOME TAX RETURN 



MORTGAGES 

WE HAVE \ PLAN TO SUIT EVERYONE 
WITH OR WITHOUT PRINCIPAL PAYMENTS 
AT REASONABLE INTEREST RATES 

VP TO TWENTY YEARS TO PAY 

G, I. — CONSTRUCTION - DIRECT REDUCTION 

SEE US IF YOU ARK PLANNING TO 
BUILD - BUY - OR REFINANCE 
YOUR PRESENT MORTGAGE 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 

Telephone Winchester 6-2130 

Winchester Savings Bank 

WIN CHESTER, MASS 



26 MTVERNON ST. 

MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 8 A M TO 2 P M. n > 




NOT OPEN SATURDAYS 



INCORPORATED 187 1 j flg^^g-^l 



U.S. WfYIDUAL "W*T«ICTim I&I8 

fifflSS. ^^.ni— 1 ......... 



■gig ^^sas^SSSSSSSSSSS. 



"Out I** 01 ■■,„„»« I— — 




<Tlt PACK SEVEN NEWS 



Cub Pack se 
uary meeting 
First Baptist ( 



■en held their .1 an - 
m the 12th at the 
hureh, After an ac- 
tive and exciting period of games 
supervised by Coach Muerling the 
meeting was formally called to or- 
der by Cubmaster Bob Low. Plans 
for the Blue and Gold Banquet to 
be held February 7th at 6:30 p. m. 
were discussed The Banquet is an 
annual custom with Pack seven and 
is in celebration of the anniversary 
of Cubbing and Scouting Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Gowing heads the banquet 
committee. Entertainment will 
be provided by a magician 
who will try to outsmart the Cubs. 

Mr. J. A. Wakefield, committee- 
man in charge of advancement 
made the following awards. 
Den 1 

Craig Edwards - Bobcat Pin 
Jeff rev McGraw - Bobcat Pin 
Den 2 

.Joseph Donovan - Lion Badge 

and Lion Cold Arrow 
Douglas Gowdy - Lion Badge and 

Lion Gold and Silver Arrows 
James Kennedy - Lion Badge and 

Lion Gold and Silver Arrows 
James Wakefield - Lion Badge 

and Lion Gold Arrow 
Den 5 

Richard Carter - Bobcat Pin 
Den 7 

Douglas Thompson - Bear Silver 
Arrow 

Christopher King - Bear Silver 
Arrow 
Den 8 

Steven Cochran - Wolf Badge 
William Lamurche - Wolf Badge 
Craig Edwards, Jeffrey Mc- 
Graw and Richard Cartel were wel- 
comed into the pack by Mr. Low 
and the Cubs. 

The Cubs were sort'V to learn 
that one of their members. Jimmy 
Kennedy. is moving to California. 
Jimmy took part In the Grand 
Howl with the pack howling in his 
honor. 



The climax of the meeting was 
a talk on safety by Police Chief 
Charles J. Han old who stressed 
the dangers of ail rifles, coasting 
in the street, riding bicycles on the 
the sidewalk and etc. Judging by 
the exclamations by the Cubs at 
the end of the Chiefs talk they 
were thoroughly convinced by bis 
arguments. 

The meeting closed with the 
Pack Cheer. Before Cubs and par- | 
ents dispersed they examined the 1 
objects of handicraft on display 
bv the various Dens. 



( I ll PACK NO 9 NEWS 



'ROUND THE MOUNTAINS' 
TRAIN .1 \M A R> 2* 




MOFFETT 
FUNERAL SERVICE 

M. G. MOFFETT 

Keg. Funeral Director and 
Embalmer 

lit Washmui.m Street. Winchester 

Tel. W Imhester 0-1730 



The Boston and Maine Railroad 
will run for the first time a wintei 
"Round-the-Mountains" excui sum 
train on Sunday. January 28, it 
was announced last night. 

A spokesman for the road said, 
"The Round-the-Mountains trains 
which have previously operated at 
fall foliage time, all carried a large 
number of patrons and the wintei 
trip is the result of many requests 
from those who would like to view 
the territory under snow condi- 
tions." 

The Round-the-Mountains train 
last fall carried over 1,400 passen- 
gers, the largest number ever 
taken through Crawford Notch. 
The winter Round-the-Mountains 
train will leave Boston at 9:00 
a. in., making stops at Winchester. 
Lowell, Bretton W nods, New 
Hampshire; Bartlett, New Hamp- 
shire; Lawrence, Mass.; and Read- 
ing, Mas.-., arriving back in Boston 
at 7:lMi p. m. 

A dinner will be a part of the 
train where passengers can tret a 
complete meal and ai rangements 
will also be made for the sale of 
sandwiches and coffee throughout 
the train. 

From the train an excellent view 
can be had of Lake Winnepesaukee, 
the White Mountains, including Mt. 
Washington, and the famous Craw- 
ford Notch. The train returns 
through the well-known ski area of 
Intervale and North Conway, New 
Hampshire. 



ENTERTAINED AT TOWN 
LYNE 

Sunday afternoon, January 14 
over forty Winchester Unitarian 
Choir members wire guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur S. Kelley of the 
Mystic Valley Parkway, at the 
Town Lytic House in I.ynnt'teld. 
Following the delicious dinner the 
choir engaged in acapella singing 
in |ua;se of their gracious host and 
hostess, who for the fifth season 
have so royally entertained the 
choir members. 

As tin' guests were leaving each 
one was presented with a beauti- 
fully be-ribboned gold box of Mrs. 
Kelley's famous and delicious 
'candy. All the members of the 
! Winchester Unitarian choir agreed 
that this was the finest and most 
I enjoyable dinner they have had as 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Kelley. 



The new Cub Scout Pack at the 
George Washington School k»{ off 
to an auspicious start last Friday 
evening with 17 hoys present for 
the first regular meeting. 

The hoys first participated in 
games led by Cubmaster Louis 
Bravacos. After some of the ex- 
cess energy was worked off the 
meeting was opened with the 
pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. 
A roll call was then made and the 
hoys were assigned to their dens 
and introduced to their I (en 
Mothers who announced the day 
and place of the weekly Den meet- 
ings. A count of the parents 
present was taken and each Den 
was credited for its adult repre- 
sentation, 

A d V a n c e mcnt Committeeman 
Francis Parsons then presented 
Cub membership cards and hand- 
books to all new members and 
transferees. Four of the trans- 
ferees, Jimmy Bravacos, Sandy 
Campbell, Bobby Gardner and 
David Leafe were presented with 
Wolf badges for their completion 
of the Wolf requirements. 

Committee Chairman Ben Mar- 
shall, after welcoming the parents, 
emphasized the importance of pa- 
rental participation and coopera- 
tion in the Cub Scout program and 
asked for their help in making the 
Pack a success. Mr. Marshall, 
describing plans for outside activ- 
ities, announced that a ski-ska te- 
cookout party would be arranged 
for the boys on the first suitable 
weekend and that a roller skating 
party at the Bal-A-Roue in Med- 
ford is scheduled for February 20. 
Additional activities planned for 
the future include a wintertime in- 
door swim, a visit to a TV studio 
and attendance at an M. I. T 
swimming meet. 

Mr, Charles Q. Adams, chairman 
of the George Washington School 
Dads' Club, sponsors of Pack No. 9 
was introduced and spoke briefly of 
what the club is doing for the 
children of the School in addition 
to backing the Cub Pack. Thanks 
to the Dads' Club the Pack has a 
"nest egg" for its treasury and a 
Pack Hag will be presented shortly, 
i After Mr. Adams' remarks the 
inei ting was closed with the cere- 
mony led by Cubmaster Bravacos. 



1950 Income Tax returns 
require listing of each cor- 
poration from which you 
receive dividends and their addresses. 
This compilation of leading corporations 
and addresses is available without charge simply by writing, 
phoning or stopping in at our office. 



AjCALLYN & CO. 

Membert of 

New York Stock Exch.n*e Mtdwett S'ock Exchange 

New York Curb Exchange (Awocnte) 

M \l RICK C. BIRD. Registered Representative 
30 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 
Telephone: HAnrotk fi-t2*>0 
Chicago New York Boston 



RENTON'S 

Church Street Opposite \\ inehester Trust Co. 

For 



STEAK 



MEAT 

- ROASTS - 



CHOPS 



HEAVY STEER BEEF - TENDER SPRING LAMB 



- POULTRY - 

BROILERS - FRYERS - ROASTERS 

Fresh — Native 

FRESH FRUIT and VEGETABLES 

— FREE DELIVERY — 

VVI 6-2332 WI 6-0534 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



HOLY N AM E ENJOYED JESUIT 

Rev. John Calvin. S. J., w a s 
guest speaker last Sunday at the 
regular monthly meeting of St. 
Mary's Holy N'ame Society at 
Kniichts of Columbus Hall. Pre- 
ceding the meeting the Society 
received communion a: the K 
o'clock mass, adjourning to the 
hall for breakfast, served under 
the direction of Coleman G. Foley, 
Jr., assisted by Michael J. Connol- 
ly, Leonard Hurley and Albert T. 
T borne. Herb Geary entertained 
din ing break fast, with piano selec- 
tions. 

President Arthur W. Hall pre- 
sided at the business meeting, dur- 
ing which Harry J. Bennett, sick 
and vigil chairman, reported that 
hospitalized members of the So- 
ciety, Michael Grant, George Dyson 
and Daniel O'Leary, had been sent 
baskets of fruit. 

President Hall reminded the 
members of the Family Commun- 
ion Breakfast to^ be held at the 
j town hall on February 11, with the 
Society's spiritual director. Rev. 
Fr. William H. Walsh, predicting 
that the popular Cleveland back- 
stop, Jim Hegan, who is to be 
truest speaker, will attract an over- 
flow crowd. It was voted to ex- 



tend formal thanks to the K. of C. 
I for the use of its hall to replace 

Lyceum Hall which was destroyed 
[by fire. 

I William J. Croughwell, program 
chairman, introduced Father 

!Ga!vin who took as his subject, 
"Whom Do You Know?" 



Pi", Galvin de 
know Christ, wt 
est influence in 
He deplored the 



•lared that if we 
know the great- 
the world today! 
lack of recogni- 



THE FINEST IN 

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FROM $189.50 UP. 

Philco Refrigerators AT NEW 
LOW PRICES 

RADIO AND TELEVISION SERVICE 
AT REASONABLE PRICES 

PARK RADIO CO. 

618 MAIN STREET Winchester 6-2280 

Serving Winchester for Over 17 Years 



tion of God, especially in meeting 
dealing with the affairs of our 
Country; for example, in the 
United Nations meetings. "You 
cannot have peace when you do 
not know the "Prince of Peace" 
Father Galvin, declared, urging his 
listeners to bring Christ into their 
jobs and to be tolerant of their fel- 
low workers as Holy Name Men, 
Fr. Galvin pointed out to the so- 
ciety that they are living a life 
based on know ledge of God, and re- 
spect for their neighbors i n the 
Community of Winchester, though 
their neighbors may not be of the 
same faith. 

The Holy Name man, with bis 
personal knowledge of Christ, has 
peace in his heart, which peace, 
through his personal example, he 
can impart to others. 



| Cummings the Florist 

| 18 Thompson Street 

j 



Tel. WI 6-1077 



*c FLOWERS 



j A Full Line of Cut Flowers and Plants f 




STOP 
FIGURING 

YOUR 
BUDGET 




[\S 1 




,/,'..V i tt /r-rm<t//cn i 



FUNERAL 5ERVICE 

hIS MASS Mt. ARLINGTON 
C«l. AS. ncton 



Kimball 



FUNERAL SERVICE 

^A. _ - Kimball 

39 Church Street 
Winchester 

Winchester 6-0200 





UNTIL YOU'VE SEEN OUR PRICES 
WE CAN HELP YOU SAVE! 

HERE IS WHAT IT COSTS 

*i pounds for 
Additional pounds 
Each piece 
(tegular shirts 



90c 
10c 
1c 
lie 



LAUNDRY 



3-13 Lincoln Street 



Phone CRvstal *».0llo 



Winchester 
Cleaning Service 



MIKE PENTA, Proprietor 



Winchester 6-051 3-J 



Homes - Offices - Stores 

WE CLEAN 

Windows, walls, floors, Venetian blinds, rugs, cellars, and at- 
tics. Windows repaired, glass set; screen and storm window 
service. Gardens, lawns, etc., cared for. Rubbish removal. 
Floors shellaced and waxed. 



ELECTRIC W ATER PUMP AT YOUR SERVICE 

FRANK REEGO 

- CONTRACTOR - 

Landscape Gardener and General Trucking. Asphalt Drive- 
ways, Roads. Equipped with 3-ton roller. Owned and Operated, 
GRADING — DRIVEWAYS — DRY WELLS 
LOAM, SAND. GRAVEL, CRUSHED STONE FOR SALE 

All Men Insured 

Tel. Winchester 6-2412 or Winchester 6-0098- W 

m»13-tl 



John W. Lane, Jr. 
— Director — 

700 Main Street, Winchester 
Winchester 6-2580 



SERIES "7 
OIL BURNER 

$297.°° 

COMPLETELY INSTALLED 

\\ e rcinut e and 
credit your coal 

Phone WOburn 2-0800 
CUMMINGS & CHUTE INC. 

Established 1886 
3 High Street W'fcburn 



1790 House Restaurant 

OPEN DAILY EXCEPT 
MONDAYS 

LUNCHEONS - $1.25 

Served Noon — 2 P. M. 



DINNERS from $1.50 

Served 5 to 8 P. M. 

— — — — — — — . — — — — 

Continuous Service Sundays and Holidays 

827 Main Street Woburn 
Tel. WO 2-2448 



FALL CLEANING 

FOR YOUR 

RUGS & CARPETS 



No time like the present to try our thorough ( leaning 
service ami give new spring to rug fibres lustrous beauty 
ami years of extra life to precious floor covering-. Our 
cleaning is the result of years of experience with both Orien- 
tal and Domestic rugs — any wonder our customers enjoy 
u>-ing our service year after year. 




J^olio I^ooclah 
14 Loch wan Street 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



& So 



tan ^Jond 
Winchester 6-2213 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 19. 1951 



3 



COCK-EYED OPTIMISTS 

For good and for evil man is 
a social being and, although there 
are moments when he does actual- 
ly crave a few seconds to himself 
all alone — even forced at times 
to travel all the way to New York 
to achieve it, he is never basically 
at his best except when cooperating 
with others of his own ilk to ac- 
complish a mutually desired goal. 
And so it has come to pass that, 
having left childhood behind and 
assumed the bread-earning activi- 
ties of an adult, men and women, 
particularly in desk-ridden Win- 
chester, have felt the need to or- 
ganize themselves for the purposes 
of physical recreation. That is why 
Winchester has a Badminton Club. 
Hundreds of the leaders of this is- 
sue of the Star have been members 
of th:s club and could tell you of 
years when they almost quarreled 
with one another over the privilege 
of playing. But, friends, "them 
days is gone, though not forgot- 
ten." 

We, however, like the librettist 
and his star Mary, are "cock-eyed 
optimists." We do not believe that 
"'hem days" are gone forever. We 
believe that Winchester teems 
with folks who would enjoy join- 
ing u? at the High School gym at 
7:30 on Tuesday- and Thursdays 
to give themselves not too violent 
a physical shake up and also to 
IBeet and chat with friends. If you 
have never played the game, you 
can soon learn it and find immedi- 
ate, solid comfort in the fact that 







1 TUXEDOS 






' FOR HIRE 






For All 






1 Occasions 


PHILIP CHITEL 


MEN'S SHOP 


596 Main 


Street 



many of us are still amateurs of the 
lowest possible level, but we do get 
the physical shake-up and we do en- 
joy our friends. To join us you need 
only three things: (li will, (2) 
non-floor-scarring sneaker*, and 
(3) the ability to pay your own 
way. 

I t is highly incredible that the 
third requirement will deter you. 
We invite you to try the first night 
gratis except possibly foj a shut- 
tlecock which would cost you 50c. 
If :hen, as we fondly hope, you de- 
cide to come again and again, you 
can either pay $7.50 for your an- 
nual membership or 75c for each of 
the first ten evenings you play. If 
you lack a racket of your own, the 
Glob will rent you one for 10c per 
evening. We question whether you 
can find any other conveniently 
located shake-up sport at such a 
low cost. Your dues are used to 
pay the rental for the gym, $7.50 
each evening we play, and to main- 
tain our memberships in the region- 
al and national organizations o t' 
badminton. If you had joined us in 
October, you would have had an op- 
portunity to play about fifty even- 
ings of badminton during the 
1(1.50-51 season. 

You see, our organization is still 
based upon a principle called Li- 
berty or Self-determination. By 
this principle we know "hat we are 
both paying the fiddler and calling 
the tune: and we want to go on 
calling the badminton tune as we 
have been doing it for the last 
twenty or so years. We invite you 
to join us in supporting this princi- 
ple as it gets concrete representa- 
tion in our Club. We are just old- 
fashioned fundamentalists: we are 
not so "intelligent and smug" as 
tn believe that the public purse is 
"a bowl of Jell-o." We want bad- 
minton, but we do not think that 
the neighbor who does not wan: it 
ought to bi' asked t<> pay for it. We 
need you, lover of good clean sport 
and fellowship, if the Winchester 
Badminton Club is not to disappear 
because of your momentary indif- 
ference. 



AMHERST BOYS RESENT 
COON'S MISSING ALL SOCCER 
TEAM 



W. H. S. GIRLS WIN 2 OUT .1 



The "Amherst Student," student 
publication at Amherst College has 
the following to say about the fail- 
ure of the pickers to place Paul 
l oon of Winchester and the "Lord 
Jeffs" on the All New Kngland 
Soccer Team : 

"When the All-New England Soc- 
cer Team was published several 
weeks ago Paul Coon's name was 
missing. Harvard's Charley Weiss 
had been chosen again. Coon, play- 
ing inside right for the third year, 
probably had his greatest season 
last fall. Five times Amherst 
came from behind to tie a soccer 
game: four of the games were 
eventually won. In every case the 
tieing goal was scored by 'Brer' 
t'oon. 

"There were only two contests in 
which Paul failed to dent the 
twines: these were the lopsided vic- 
tories over Massachusetts and 
Clark. Probably the three 
toughest games played this 
year were the 4 - 2 loss 
to Wesleyan and the pair of 2 - I 
victories over Harvard and Wil- 
liams. In all three Paul was the 
first to score. As a (dutch per- 
former Paul Coon must be regarded 
as one of the best." 
Ed. Note . . . Paul is the son of 
Park Commissioner and Mis. 
James H. t'oon of Brooks street. 

not; s \Nt tion m vtch 



January 10th saw the Winches- 
ter senior, junior, and sophomore 
girls' basketball teams playing 
class games at Belmont. The 
seniors won 33 - 16 with Sue Mor- 
ton scoring 13 points and Bette 
Kneeland accounting for 10. The 
juniors tied 27 - 27; and Paula Lani- 
gan was their high scorer with an- 
other 13 points. The sophomores 
came out on top 20 - lib Ann 
Hooper chalking 
points and Peggy 
for 10. 

The line-ups were as ft 

Seniors 



GIRLS' VARSITY TAKES 
( LOSE ONE 



ip a third 13 
McHugh going 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 
January IS -31 



LOCAL SERVICE 

r 



LOCAL SERVICE 



The sixth Annual Sanction 
Match sponsored by the New Eng- 
land Hog Training Club, will lie 
held on Sunday, January 28 in the 
spacious First Corps Cadet Ar- 
mory, Arlington street, Boston, op- 
posite the Hotel Statler, under the 
direction of Edith P. Hall, Cam- 
bridge 'Obedience Trial Commit- 
tee, Chairman" and Mrs. Berthil 
Ekstrom, Waltham, Chairman of 
Sanction Trial Committee. Mem- 
bers of the N. E. D. C. and several 
additional dog training clubs look 
forward to this interesting event, 
which i< always is a dress rehear- 
sal for the A. K. C. licensed obedi- 
ence competition held every year 
in conjunction with the F.astern 
Dog Club show in February. 



8 
P 

m 

7} 

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s 



r 

I 



TELEVISION 

INSTALLATION 
SERVICE 
SALES 

LOCAL SERVICE IS BETTER 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



I WINCHESTER APPLIANCE CO. 

£ 1 5 Thompson Street Winchester 6-2990 



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LOCAL SERVICE 



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CIVIL SERVICE IS 
BEST SEALER OF 
WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Exam for Winchester, 
March .11: 
File Application 
bv March 12 



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Our Home Study Course is 
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Over 21 Years Teaching 
Civil Service Courses 

Call KE 6-4518 
for details or write 
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271 Huntington Ave., Boston 

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Three Plain Garments 
Cleaned for the 
Price of Two 

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THIS OFFER GOOD ONLY FROM JAN. 18 TO FEB. 1 



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For Pick-up Service 



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10'"' Discount it Our Store* 
One Broadway— Arlington — 83-4 Mass. Ave. at Newman Wa> 
STORE HOURS: — 8 a. m. to 6 p. in., including Saturday 





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Hoonef, Ann 


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Siilli\ an. Jti'iy 


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The Winchester girls went to 
Lexington on January 11th and 
came home with two wins: the first 
team game by a 47 - 45 score and 
the second team game by a 32 - 2<5 
score. The last minute of play in 
; the Varsity came was a nerve- 
wracking and exciting one with 
Lexington tying the score, then 
going ahead, and Jean N'eiley fin- 
ally saving the day by sinking two 
timely baskets. Jean played an ex- 
cellent all-around game being high 
scorer with a staggering 27 points. 
Bette Kneeland earned second place 
honors with 14 points to her credit. 
In the Jay-Vee name, Paula Lani- 
gan and Carol Crockett were liitrh 
scorers with I-'? and 11 points res- 
pectively. 

VARSITY 

Winchester 



KK 


Pum»n, Mai*y Anno 




Ki- 


Morton. Sue 


- 


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Neiley, Jean • capi. i 




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Kn.elanil Hette 


ii 


Cr 


I.iinitran, Paula 


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1 Kt; 


Chiswfll. Jim.- 


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Hawkins, Carol 




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Snell. Ju.ly 




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Mo>l>onald. Mains 




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Kaston, Jan 






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Kilsso 






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Winchester 




KI 


Callahan, Caliy 


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KK 


Daschhuch. Gretchic 




KI 


Ilooj>or. Ann 




; KK 


Morton. Sue 




l.l- 


O'Conm-ll, Mary Capt, i 


11 


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Crockett, Carol 


I ] 


1 1 


Mo.«s. Cie 


1 


I 1- 


Snow. I.nuia 




CK 


I^tniKan, Paula 




CF 


Mi'HurIi, IH'sy 




Kt; 


Ste\'.-ns. l.ynne 


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Smith. Itu^s 


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Connors. Joan 


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TWO 




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-ii-r (,.07,'io-Yt 


Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 





CHAMOIS SKI CLUB REPEAT 
PERFORMANCE 



"To ski and swing", Chamois's 
the thing! Swing your partner, 
that is, at Chamois Ski Club's 
second Square Dance evening of 
the year. After the tremendous 
success of the first Square Dance 
back in September, we've decided 
to have another one, bigger and, if 
possible, better than the others! 
Winchester's own caller, Al Smith, 
will be on hand, and to take care 
of the usual crowds we've switched 

' location to the Winchester Town 
Hall. The da+e is February 9, and 
that's a Friday night, so it won't 

1 interfere with your ski weekend. 
Tti make the dance possible for the 
bulging purses of high school stu- 
dents we've a special rate for them 

I — watch for posters for more in- 
formation. 

Me one of the crowd, come on 

| down, "Shimmy with the Chamois" 
at the best Square Dance of the 
year! 



KK 
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CK 
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CO 



Flaherty 
Korntfessir 
Norlin 
Poniposn 

Wiltlos 

Snmborski 

Raymond 

Mortimer 

Powers 

MarDonnlil 

Polley 

Teissier 

Oldford 

Cross 

Webster 

Layte 

Smith 

Miller 



Lexington 



FRESHMEN WIN THIRD 
STRAIGHT 

The Winchester High Freshmen 
won their third straight victory of 
the season by defeating the Wake- 
Held Freshmen by a score of 50 - 
';;i at Wakefield on Wednesday 
afternoon. The Red and Black 
yearlings played their best game of 
the season in winning this one as 
they were closely pressed all the 
way. Particularly pleasing to 
Coach Knowlton was the even dis- 
tribution of the scoring among his 
five major players as big John 
Riordan tallied 12 points and Pete 
Perkins turned in his best perfor- 
mance of the season. 

The Winchester Junior High 
team lost their second game in 
three starts as Wakefield Junior 



High triumphed by a score 
19 in a close game. 

Winchester Kreshmen 



of 23 - 



LEAGUE LEADING INDIANS 
ON ROAD 



Rebecca Jackson is a member of 
the Speakers' Bureau at Lasell 
Junior College in Auburndale. A 

'freshman in the retail training 
couise, she is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mis. J. Addison Jackson of 

i 17 Pine street, Winchester. 



Whit* Steam 
in the Morning Sun 

As the temperature begins to 
hover around the zero mark, I 
notice commuters beginning to 
divide themselves into two 
groups. They're the fresh air 
fiends — the boys who stand out 
on the platform in the sun, 
shivering. The other group stay 
in the warmth of the station. 

Last week I joined the fresh 
air boys — their coat collars 
turned up; their newspapers 
stuffed in pockets waiting to be 
read later on aboard the train. 
Opposite were two freight cars 
on a siding behind the local 
feed and grain store. About a 
dozen pigeons perched, puffed 
up and cold, on the ridge pole. 
The group didn't seem very 
talkative. It was as though their 
words and breath were frozen. 
As I approached, it seemed they 
had been speculating in a de- 
sultory way on the two freight 
cars, one marked Santa Fe, the 
other D. & H. 

"The railroads use each other's cars 
in a way that is like a pool," I heard 
one guy say. "Sometimes a car is 
away from its home base six months 
or more." 

"That's right," another said, "but 
they're not just idk. Sometimes they 
go back empty, but mostly they are 
filled with New England products 
going West, South or North." 

"Must be a pretty complicated 
piece of bookkeeping," chipped in a 
third. 

We heard the long whistle of the 
8:08 about a mile down the track. The 
engine turned the bend. White steam 
caught the morning sun, billowing up 
and away against the clean, blue sky. 

The group watched silently before 
sut-h bcautv. 

Now I knew one reason why the 
fresh air crowd shunned the creature 
comforts of the radiator. 



Winchester High is on the road 
this week as they play two impor- 
tant Middlesex League games. 
Tonight the locals travel to Wake- 
field to play a surprisingly strong 
Wakefield team that is currently 
tied for second place in the 
league standing. The C ardinal and 
Gray has lost only to Belmont and 
Lexington by a total of seven 
points and figure to be tough to 
beat on their home court. They 
have one of the biggest teams in 
the league, play very aggressive 
ball, and the locals will have to be 
at their sharp-shooting best to take 
this one. 

Tuesday afternoon the Red and 
Black plays at Reading and they 
are always a tough nut to crack on 
their home floor. Winchester de- 
feated Reading easily four weeks 
ago at Winchester and should win 
this one if they play -he brand of 
ball of which they are capable. 
Anything less than a top perfor- 
mance on the small Reading court, 
however, could easily be disastrous 
to the locals' winning streak. 

League Standing 
Winchester <i 
Helmont 4 
Wakefield 4 
Lexington 1 
Reading 2 
Stoneham 2 
Melrose 2 
Concord 0 





V 


f 


pts 


Dilorio, if 






\< 


MrDnnoufth, If 


o 


It 


II 


Riordan. 'f 






12 


O'Brien, rf 


t. 


il 


II 


Pratt, e 


-1 


1 


•I 


M.-Kinlev. 


ti 


II 


0 


Hellinn, g 




1 


11 


Butler, I* 


o 


0 


li 


I.imisey. rpr 


n 


(i 


n 


Perkins, rn 


4 


I 


ii 


Becker, ip 


11 


o 


0 


Totals 


20 


in 


SO 


Wakefield 


Kre-hrocn 








(T 


f 


ptts. 


Oranslon. If 




1 


1 1 


l.nvton. !f 


o 


i\ 


(1 


Stephens, rf 


■1 


0 


s 


Jeffries, rf 


o 


1 


1 


Crupe, e 




o 


4 


Hollett. c 


1 






Ootlrley. Ijp 


0 




0 


Montgomery, tr 




0 


4 


Hennessey ,rd 




1 




Kariffici, r* 




0 


4 


Totals 


IS 


:i 





(I 



Referee. Tucker 

INDIAN (TBS TOP MELROSE 

The Winchester High Freshmen 
swamped the Melrose Freshmen 
56 - 23 at the high school gym last 
Friday afternoon to annex their 
second straight victory 'if the sea- 
son. Dave Pratt was again the 
high scorer for the locals as be 
threw in 21 points. 13 of which 
came in the final period. Joe Di- 
lorio probably clinched a starting 
berth for himself with a strong 1". 
point performance while Al l.ind- 
sey again turned in an excellent 

floor game. 

The Junior High quintet edged 
the Melrose Junior High by a score 
of 35-31 for their firs; victory, 
against one defeat. Wally Hart 
paced the scoring with in points 
while Bill Ross gave a tine all 
around performance. 

Winehestrr Kre-hmen 

g 1 pts. 



BAPTIST BROTHERHOOD 
BREAKFAST 



At 8:45 o'clock Sunday morning, 
January 21st, the monthly Brother- 
hood Breakfast will be held in the 
Social Hall of the rhm.h. Fol- 
lowing the breakfast Dr. Forbes 
Norris will review one of the out- 
standing and challenging books of 
the day "The Vatican and World 
Power." All men are cordially in- 
vited. 



nilt.rio. If 
MrDonmiffh. 
Riordnn. rf 
O'ltrien. rf 
Pratt, c 
Becker, e 
Hellinn. Ik 
MeKinley. !k 
' I.inilsey, ru 
Perkins, rir 
Butler, tk 

Tota s 



If 



Melrose Kreshmrn 



A Classified 
brings Results. 



Ad in the Star 



Currier. If 

Pope. If 

Seaman, rf 
Meehun, rf 
Want, c 
Hersey, Ik 
Sullivan, in 

Shimmin, ri{ 



:4 

I 

sr 

0 
li 
1 

3 



Totit is 
Referee, 



Morrocco 



pts. 

1 
n 



HERE THEY ARE! 

THAT NEW 1951 LINE 

OF 

WALLPAPERS 

YOU HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR ! 

L uitctl Wallpapers Lloyd's — Seh urn acker 
— Wallcrest Hir»c ami Imported Papers. 

SEE THEM NOW AT 

The Store With the Proven Products 

HILLSIDE 

PAINT & WALLPAPER CO. 

578 Main St., < Cor. Park St. i Winchester Square 

Tel. Winchester 6*3266 



INDIANS WON THRILLER 
PROM BELMONT 



A screaming capacity croud saw 
Winchester High take over first 
place in the Middlesex League by 
defeating Belmont High .~>-J - 4 7 at 
the high school gym last Friday 
night. This was the !>ig test for the 
inexperienced local* and they pass 
ed it with flying colors as they 
withstood a spirited Belmont rally 
in the last quarter to win a well-de- 
served victory. The game was close 
all the way but the Red and Black 
held the lead throughout except for 
a short time in the second period 
when Belmont overhauled the locals 
to go ahead temporarily. 

Belmont scored the 'first basket 
of the game hut Winchester moved 
out in front 13-7 at the end of the 
first period as all live Red and 
Black starters scored at least two 
points. The first five minutes of 
'lie second quarter was a night 
mare to local fans as the Red ami 
Blaek became disorganized and 
Helmont moved into a 1!»-1H lead, 
i The locals pulled themselv OS to- 
| gether, however, to leave the floor 
leading 2(5-23 at half time. Charlie 
Murphy was the life-saver in this 
hectic period as he scored g ,>f the 
13 Winchester points to keep his 
team in the game. 

Winchester played good ball in 
the third period to add 5 points to 
their half time margin to lead :{x.:i(i 
going into the final quarter. With 
three minutes to play the locals 
led )8 :iK and seemed to have the 
game well in hand but three quick 
baskets and a foul shot by a sud- 
denly "hot" Belmont team cut the 
margin to 48-45 with two minutes 
to play and the gym was rocking 
with excitement. It was imi ossihh 
to even hear tiie official's whistle 
over the final two minutes but a 
basket by Dilorio and successful 
foul shots by Murphy and Hawkins 
clinched a thrilling victory by Win 
Chester. A big factor in that final 
period was the 5 points scored by 
Johnny Farrell which came at a 
vital time as he paced the Red ami 
Black scoring m that period. 

The game was won from the foul 
line as Winchester made good on 22 
free throws. Belmont employed a 
very light, pressing defense which 
-lowed up the Winchester attack 
i hut which was conducive to con- 
siderable fouling on which the 
! locals were able to capitalize. Win- 
ohcstei continued to shoot well a> 
they made good on 34 per cent of 
| their shots but were not able to 
' take as many shots as usual be- 
cause of the pressing Helmont de- 
fense and the frequent fouls. 
Charlie Murphy and Doug Hawkins 
were the particular Winchestei 
heroes as they were the keys to the 
Winchester offense with Murphv 
scoring Hi points and Hawkins 10. 
Hawkins controlled the defensive 
backboard almost single handedly 
ami did an effective job of covering 
Greene, the Belmont high-scorei 
for the season. 

The Winchestei Seconds made 
the evening complete for the local 
fans by burying the Belmont Sec- 
onds under a 77-41 score for their 
highest scoring total of the season. 
Bob Flaherty with 14 points, Norm 
Howard with 13, Bob Forester with 
12. and Joe Donlon with 10 led the 
scoring parade for Winchester but 
it was Peter Coon who caught the 
eye of the crowd with his aggress- 
iveness and bail stealing tactics. 
The jayvees have developed into a 
high scoring outfit and bid well to 
rival the varsity in crowd appeal 
because of the ease and smoothness 
with which they set up their attack. 

The summary: 

Winciitster ilich 



Symmefi. if 
ForeMer, !f 
Long, rf 
Farre!!, rf 
Hawking, c 
Murphy. '(? 
Ctrurso, 1bt 
Dilorio, rg 

Total* 



('oilier, if 
Atviatpr. if 
O 1^-ary. rf 
Ml J-auithiin 
Mills, 
(ire*n«- 
Ktrr, 
Malon. 
Poles.-, 
Kaiial. .. 
I ShauKhn.-ss. 
Schatxk 



ptR 



Belmont (huh 



rf 



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Ik 



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TotaU 
Hetermt, I • 



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Wold oines from House in the 
Pines at Norton, Msgs., that mem- 
bers of the dramatic club presented 
a one-act play entitled "The Happy 
Man." M;s.- Virginia Farnsworth, 
daughtei of Mr. and Mis. Vincent 
Farnsworth. Jr. of 8 Worthen road, 
ano. Miss Sylvia A. <iagan. daugh- 
tei of Mr. Raymond A. (jagan of 21 
New Meadows p ad, were membera 
of the cast. 



4 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 19. 1951 



The Winchester Star 

(Established IsSO) 

STAR BlILDLVG 
3 ( HI l« M STREET 

WINCHESTER, MASS. 
Theodore I'. Wilson 
Kdi'or and I'ublisher 

Published Every Friday 

SIM.I.K COIMES. TKN CENTS 
Left at Your Residence for 1 Year 
The Winchester Star. $2.50 in 
Advance. 



News Items, Lodge Meetincs, So- 
ciety Events, Personals, etc., sent 
to this office will be welcomed by 
the Editor. 

KntiTwl ut the |K»toffi«e at Winchester, 

Ma»s.. hs 8t.**orul-claaa matter. 

The Winchester Star assumes no 
financial responsibility for typo- 
graphical errors in advertisements 
but will publish without charge a 
correction in the next issue, or re- 
publish that portion of the adver- 
tisement which is incorrect. 

Telephone Winchester 6-0029 



Only Newspaper 
Printed In Winchester 

Serving the Community for 
TO Years 

Largest Sworn Circulation 



• Representee Winchester | 

! i 

| Senators in Conuress { 
j Leverett Saltonstall j 
j Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. j 

| Congressman, ")th District j 

I Edith N'oui si' lingers j 

| Senator (ith Middlesex j 
District | 
' Harris S, Richardson ^ 

| Representative in General • 
I Court 

I Harrison- ( 'hadwiek 

I County Commissioner 

| James A. Cullen ; 

1 i 

The attention of parents of chil- 
dren in the elementary schools i> 
directed to the communication of 
the School Committee which ap- 
peals elsewhere in this issue. Last 
week the Star had a notice from 
the Committee which many, includ- 
ing the Star, read to mean in ef- 
fect a one-session day in the local 
elementary schools. Such appar- 
ently was not the intent of the 
School Committee, as their latest 
ruling states, and children who can 
safely and conveniently attend the 
regular two-sessions of school each 
day are expected to do so. What the 
Committee has done is to make pro- 
vision for children who in stormy 
weather can not easily or safely get 
to school. They may now take their 
lunch and remain at school all day. 
All the children are not expected 
to follow such procedure; indeed, 
not very many are expected to do 
so. Most children can get to school 
well enough on days when sessions 
are held. (Ask any old timer who 
hoofed a mile to the school house 
in all sorts of going without any- 
thing like the protective clothing 
so many kiddies have nowadays!) 
The present school day has been 
shortened half an hour and the time 
between morning and afternoon 
sessions lias also been shortened to 
an hour. Last week the time be- 
tween sessions was announced as 
three-quarters of an hour, which 
seemed short. Apparently Others 
besides the Star thought this was 
so. We can see no particularly 
good reason why it, or the school 
day should be shortened at ail. ex- 
cept that those who take their 
lunch are going to find the day at 
school under such conditions a long 
one. This is what opponents of 
one-session school for young chil- 
dren have contended, or at least, it 
is one of their contentions. As we 
understand it, this new shorter 
school day applies only during win- 
ter weather when conditions can 
be bad. The Committee, in mak- 
ing the new regulations has been 
moved by consideration for the 
health and safely of the school chil- 
dren, which is as it should be, of 
course They are asking parents 
to use the same yardstick in deter- 
mining whether then children shall 
follow the old or new school pat- 
tern. And the parents, apparently, 
aren't going to be the sole judges, 
for they are being asked in the 
event they want their children to 
bring lunches and remain at school 
all day, to give reasons why they 
should do so. We assume again if 
these reasons do not seem good or 
sufficient, they may be rejected by 
the school authorities, most o f 
whom we think would feel a break 
in the school day is desirable foi 
young children, at least, and for 
teachers, - if not for mothers! 



have expressed ar, opinion and from 
members of the Committee. The ar- 
chitect has been informed of the 
latter's decision to have the addi- 
tions built of brick which matches 
the existing building. 

The present costs of construc- 
tion seem to dictate a simpler de- 
sign for the additions than for the 
original structure but the Commit- 
tee is confident that the new wings 
will be in good proportion and be- 
come integral parts of the whole 
building. 

Again the Committee wishes to 
thank you for the interest you 
have taken in this part of its prob- 
lem. If others who do not agree 
with certain details of the plan> as 
they have been presented would 
only follow your example and give 
the Committee the benefit of their 
expert and thoughtful suggestions, 
rapid progress could be made to- 
ward a satisfactory solution of our 
secondary school building problem. 

Very Sincerely yours, 
High School and Enlarged Junior 
High School Building Committee. 
Rachel T. Kimball, Chairman 



READ THIS AND WEEP! 



Harold b. bowne 



A POOR TIME FOR LARGE 
EXPENDITURE 



Kditor of the Star: 

I read with surprise your criti- 
cism of the opponents of the pro- 
posed secondary school building 
program. You say that they 
should have offered at the public 
hearing of January 9th their ob- 
jections to the Building Commit- 
tee's recommendations and made 
suggestions for improvements. On 
I the contrary, it seems to me that 
the public hearing should not have 
heen held at all. 

It is true that the recommenda- 
tions of the Committee were ap- 
proved by the Special Town Meet- 
ing of November 30, 1950 but it is 
also true that they were rejected 
by the voters of the town at the 
referendum of December 'JK. 

1' is an insult to good govern- 
ment tn ask for a second Special 
Town Meeting on tin- same subject 
and the Building Committee was 
unwise in holding a public hearing 
mi the same plans that had been 
rejected by the whole town. If 
those plans are f" be further dis- 
ciis-ed the place for that is in Town 
I see thai the oppo- 
to present their 



ob- 



the Building 

reiected at the 



Meeting and 
. nerits intend 
lections there. 

In my opinior 
( 'ommittee was ab 
referendum of December l's. While 
1 have no criticism of the members 
of that Committee as good citizens, 
I believe that a majority of them 
should have been people expe- 
rienced in construction. 

We should have a new commit- 
tee to solve the problem and I be- 
lieve that better results would be 
obtained if it is appointed by the 
town instead of by the moderator. 

This is a poor time to rush into 
such a large expenditure for a pro- 
ject on which we do not all heartily 
agree. 

George M. Bryne 
1 Copley street 



COMMUNICATION 

Editor of the Star: 

I wish to express my great ap- 
preciation for your kind attention 
and treatment while gathering 
data for your story on my father, 
Harold B. Bowne. Your manner 
has been a model for all newsmen. 

1 further wish to express through 
you my apologies to any of his 
friends or acquaintances who may 
not have heard the sad news in 
time for the funeral. I did not in- 
tend to omit anyone, and such a slip 
is purely unintentional . 

I further wish to acknowledge 
my thanks and appreciation to our 
many friends and townsmen who 
have offered their services and 
and sympathy at this time of sor- 
row. I wish those who were un- 
able to attend his services for 
eithei business or health reasons 
to know that we understand their 
circumstances and appreciate their 
feelings. My fathei was often not 
able to attend services for his 
friends in recent years, lest his 
health should suffer, In turn, I 
know that he would not want others 
to suffer illness or injury by over- 
straining themselves to attend his 
services, "They also serve who 
only stand and wait." 

Very sincerely, 
William L. Bowne 



TO MRS ELIZABETH 
LOBLNG1EK; 



M. 



Kditor of the Star: 

The High School and Enlarged 
Junior High School Building Com- 
mittee appreciate very much the 
constructive suggestions made in 
last week's Star, regarding the 
color and design of the additions 
called for in the plan to enlarge the 
present Junior High School. 

The Committee is in complete ac- 
cord with your feeling that a 
beautiful building should not be 
spoiled by additions which do not 
harmonize with it. The Committee 
has never been uncertain on that 
point. It did feel, however, that it 
should considei different proposals 
as to how a pleasing exterior might 
be achieved before it reached a final 
decision. 

The architect's first sketch shows 
the additions built of a light brick 
to match the w indow trim on the 
present buiiding. A subsequent 
sketch which shows the additions in 
red brick, has met with much 



ANOTHER ATTEMPT FAILS 



Editor of the Stai : 

In keeping with the pledge made 
by the High St hool and Enlarged 
Junioi High School Building Com- 
mittee at its Public Hearing on 
January 9, 1951 another effort was 
made to meet with the officers of 
the Referendum Committee. Let- 
ters were sent to the chairman and 
secretary of the Referendum Com- 
mittee inviting them and other 
members of the Referendum Com- 
mittee t.i attend the Building Com- 
mittee's meeting at the school ad- 
ministration offices at 8:15 on 
Tuesday, January 1»'>. No member or 
representative of the Referendum 
Committee came to this meeting. 

The Building Committee feels 
that it has made every possible ef- 
fort to meet with the opposition to 
discuss and clarify any differences 
of opinion concerning the secondary 
school building program. Each ef- 
fort has been rejected by the Ref- 
erendum Committee. 

Km the High School and Enlarged 
Junior High School Building Comm. 
Rachel T. Kimball, Chairman 



WARNING TO Dot, OWNERS 

Editoi of the Stat : 

1 would appreciate it if you 
would put this note in the Star to 
let others that own dogs know that 
on Monday my dug was stricken 
with a bad dose of poisoning, 
caused by strychnine. Luckily we 
succeeded in reaching the doctor in 
time to save his life, but not to 
sa\ e a iot of .-Hiffenng. 

i thought it my duty to let others 
know, so that if their dog acts un- 
usual they will check on it. 

Claire E. Mullen 
8 Park road 

OTHER COMMUNICATIONS 
ON PAGE 9 



Massachusetts' share of Pres- 
ident Truman's proposed $71.6 bil- 
lion budget as submitted to Con- 
gress on Monday amounts to $'2,- 
434,000,000, the Taxpayeis Feder- 
ation revealed this week. 

"This staggering tax load is 
about 10 times the present State 
budget," Norman MacDonald, Fed- 
eration executive director said. 
"It is almost rive times the cost of 
- operating the 351 cities and towns 
in the Commonwealth for one 
year". 

A further breakdown of this 
enormous sum by the Federation 
shows that, if the proposed Truman 
budget were figured on a per capita 
basis, Winchester's share would be 
§8,100,000. 

' Foi the average breadwinner, 
of average income, with an average 
size family of four, his share of the 
federal budget request for one year 
will be $2,075.68, which amounts to 
$518.92 for every man, woman and 
child," MacDonald announced. 

"These figures," MacDonald said, 
"should at last awaken the people 
of the Commonwealth and of the 
country to the necessity of economy 
in federal, state and local spending 
This pi'oposed budget of $71.6 bil- 
lion is about nine times the amount 
spent by the federal government in 
1940 when we were preparing for 
war. It is equal to about 33 pet 
cent of the total national income 
in 1949. 

"It is obvious that Washington 
dreamers and planners still have a 
. tremendous influence in the na- 
tion's capitol in protecting their pet 
schemes and ideas against any cuts, 
even in a time of national emer- 
gency. It clearly is evident that 
such a figure as submitted by the 
President is loaded with non-essen- 
tial items that do not contribute to 
our national security or welfare." 

MacDonald declared that the 
time is now ripe for the people 
"Who must pay through the nose" 
tn take a hand in shaping federal 
spending policies. 

"Every citizen should write his 
representatives in Washington im- 
mediately," he advised, "to demand 
that every dime not needed for the 
defense effort be cut out of budget 
requests. We have neither time 
nor money for experiments or 
frills during a period when we are 
faced with a life and death st nig- 
gle to survive — either in war, oi 
in financially preparing for war. 

"In addition Congress should he 
advised that there is no longer any 
conceivable reason to delay in 
adopting the recommendations of 
the Hoover Commission." 

MacDonald also warned that the 
"fantastic" federal budget pointed 
up the need for rigid economy in 
state and local spending. "Mem- 
bers of the Massachusetts Legisla- 
ture and local officials also should 
be told by citizens across the State 
to hold expenses in line with the 
emergency, he said, 

LL'NCH PERIOD LENGTHENED 
FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



The following letter from the 

Winchester School Committee has 

been taken home this week by ele- 
mentary school children: 

January Pi. 1951 

To the Parents: 

The School Committee regrets 
that a misunderstanding apparent- 
ly exists in regard to the recent 
notice on school lunches. The 
change in lunch hour was not in- 
tended as a single session day with 
the majority of the pupils remain- 
ing at the school tor lunch* hut was 
initiated purely from considera- 
tions of safety, traffic hazards and 
travel to and from school during 
the period of heavy winter weather. 

Tin' inadequacy of the present 15 
minute lunch hour has been (ailed 
to tin- attention of the Committee. 
We are, therefore, extending the 
lunch period to one hour (11:15 to 
12:45, with dismissal at 2:45) be- 
ginning next Monday, January 
22nd. 

The ''ommittee expects onl,' 
those children to remain for lunch 
who nave to travel an unusual dis- 
tance oi are subject to abnormal 
traffic hazards. 

Therefore, we ask the parents to 
reassess their decisions in the light 
of these facts. The Committee 
realizes that almost any system 
will cause some dissatisfaction. 
However, only one consideration 
should dictate the parents' response 
— the health and safety of their 
children. If you wish your child 
to remain for lunch throughout the 
rest <if the winter, please send an- 
other note to the principal by Jan- 
uary 19th stating the distance and 
hazards to the child. 

Forbes II. Norris 
Secretary to the School Committee 
Winchester Public Schools 



WORTH SEEING! 



The de Cordova and Dana Mu- 
seum and Paik in Lincoln, an old 
castle high on a hill overlooking a 
pond has been remodeled inside and 
out Now we have one of the most 
up-to-date housings for art treas- 
ures in the country. You have to 
see it to appreciate it, in fact it is 
hard to believe such a place exists 
within our reach. The remodeling 
was done to the tune uf $207,000, 
So you can see it must be quite a 
place. In addition to wonderful 
monthly exhibitions and the per- 
manent collection exhibitions — 
free to the public — are offered 
classes in many of the arts and 
crafts at very reasonable rates. 

The exhibition this month is to 
point out to visitors that things 
beautifully designed and hand- 
made are available at prices com- 
parable to the cost of masspro* 
timed items. There are many sam- 
ples of marvelous hand-block-print- 
ed materials from Block House of 
Boston. Very tine examples of 
ceramics are carefully armnged to 
tone in with the display uf fabrics. 
Winchester's own Macetield is one 
of a group of three shops chosen 
to present hand wrought jewelry 
and silversmithing. It is an honor 
for Macetield and for Winchester 
to be represented in so fine a show- 
place. This exhibition ends Jan- 
uary 29. 

Open daily, except Monday 10-5 
Sunday 2-5 go to Lincoln center 
and down Sandv Pond road a very 
short distance. Worth seeing'' 



Harold B. Bowne of 21 Foxcroft 
road, district auditor and office 
managerofthe Consolidated Chemi- 
cal Industry, died suddenly Satur- 
day night, January 13, at his home, 
of an acute heart attack. He had 
been in his usual health during the 
day and was playing cards with 
members uf his family and friends 
when he was stricken, dying be- 
fore medical assistance could reach 
him. 

Mr. Bowne was the son of Wil- 
liam B.. and Esmilda (Garfield) 
Bowne. his mother having been a 
niece uf President James Garfield. 
He was born June 21, 1890, in West 
Dennis, was graduated from Phil- 
lips Andover Academy in 1908 and 
from Sheffield Scientific School at 
Yale in the class of 1911 . 

After college he was for a time 
on the Pacific Coast at Portland. 
Or., and Seattle. Wash., with rail- 
roading interests and the Wells 
Fargo Express Co. During World 
War I he was with the Booth 
Fisheries in Alaska and later was 
business manager for Tony West- 
gard, inventor of the big Wostgard 
saw with removable teeth used in 
I umbel' camps. 

When Mr. Westgard sold his pat- 
ents in l'rj:', Mr. Bowne returned 
east to become associated with the 
Boston accounting firm of Price 
Watei house and Co.. making his 
home in Saugus. He later joined 
the old American Glue Company 
in the late twenties, remaining with 
the firm until its equities were sold 
out after the financial crash. At 
that time the Consolidated Chemi- 
cal Industry with headquarters in 
San Francisco, CaL, took over cer- 
tain of the (Hue Company's equities 
and established a New England Di- 
vision with headquarters in Wo. 
burn, Mr. Bowne being one o f 
several American Clue employees 
to become associated with the new- 
division. He bad been with Con- 
solidated Chemical for the past 18 
years. 

Mr. Bowne came to Winchester 
from SaugHS in 1!»:>7, living first 
on Forest street and later on Lin- 
colnshire Way. He had been at 
his late address since 1944. He was 
a member of the Traffic Club of 
Boston, Seaview Masonic Lodge uf 
Revere, William Parkman Lodge. 
A. F. and A. M., of Winchester, in 
which he was active as an instruct- 
or; and Winchester Royal Arch 
< hapter. 

Surviving are his wife. Mrs. 
Rosalie Leon Bowne: a son. Wil- 
liam I.. Bowne of Winchester: and 
a granddaughter, Lotion Dorothy 
Bowne. 

The funeral was held Tuesday 
afternoon at Meyer Chapel of the 
Unitarian Church. Lev. John Pres- 
cott Robertson, pastor of the First 
Congregational Church in Brain- 
tree, who studied Masonry under 
Mr. Bowne, officiated. Cremation 
followed the service. 

MRS. GRACE ESTELLE ADAMS 

Mrs. Grace Estelle Adams of n 
Mystic avenue, widow of Charles 
Stanton Adams, who was foi many 
years a popular taxi operator in 
Winchester, died Tuesday, January 
I'!, at Arnold House, a nursing 
home in Stoneham, following sever- 
al months' illness. She and hei 
husband were admitted during last 
November to the Winchester Hos- 
pital where Mr. Adams died De- 
comber H. 1950, Mrs. Adams, had. 
however, been in failing health 
since the first of last year. 

Born in Stoneham November 21, 
1871, Mrs. Adams was the daugh- 
ter of George W., and Zoa ( Moody) 
Newhall, her father having been a 
veteran of the Civil War. She was 
educated in the Stimeham schools 
and at Bridgewater Normal School, 
from which she was graduated in 
the class of 1800, She taught for 
a time until her marriage to Mi. 
Adams on July 10, 1895, the cere- 
mony being performed in Winches- 
ter by the late Lev. D. Augustine 
Newton, then pastor of the First 
Congregational Church. 

Mrs. Adams spent all her mar- 
ried life in Winchester, she and 
her husband first living in the old 
Adams homestead on High street, 
now occupied by Mr. Thomas M. 
Vinson, and later on Main street, 
They had lived at the Mystic ave- 
nue address since 1906. 

Many will remember Mrs. Adams 
as a clerk at the old drygoods 
store of Miss Bowser, then located 
where part of Winton's Hardware 
now stands. Later she was with 
Bowser and Bancroft, successor to 
Miss Bowser. She also enjoyed a 
town-wide reputation as a fancy 
cook, her sponge cake being a 
standard for that delicacy in Win- 
chester. 

Mrs. Adams was a member of 
Stoneham Camp, Daughters of 
Union Veterans; of the First Con- 
gregational Church and the West- 
ern Missionary Society, ami of the 
Fortnightly Woman's Club. 

She leaves a son, Dr. Arthur S. ' 
Adams, president of the American 
Counsel on Education and former 
president of the University of New 
Hampshire; a grandson, John Stan- 
ton Adams, Cornell Law School 
student: three great granddaugh- 
ters, Holly, Dorothy and Carol 
Adams; and two brothers, Moody 
Newhall and Arthur N. Newhall, 
both of Stoneham. 

Funeral services were held 
Thursday afternoon at Ripley, 
Chapel of the First Congregational 
Church w ith the minister, Dr. How- 
ard J. Chidley. officiating. Inter- 
ment was in Wildwood Cemetery. 

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Totals 11 

K*-f,Tf',-s. GaUtgan anH Bradley 



ELECTED AT UNIVERSITY 
OF MAINE 



Harry Easton, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Easton, !» Senecu road, 
ami Doris Casey, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. James Casey. 1* Russell 
foad were elected to ciass offices at 
the University of Maine in ballot- 
ing January 12. Easton, who is 
majoring in business administra- 
tion, was elected treasurer of the 
junior , lass. Miss Casey, who is 
majoring in medical technology, 
was elected treasurer of the fresh- 
man class. 



Richard 1. Spencer, age 20, 8 
Yale street. Winchester, Mass. en- 
listed in the U. S. Air Force with 
rank of Private it has been an- 
nounced by USA and CSAF Re- 
cruiting station at 7»> Pearl street, 
Portland, Maine He was sworn in 
on January 1»'>. 1951 and will re- 
port to Lackland AF Base. San 
Antonio. Texas as his initial assign- 
ment. 

Private Spencer is the son of 
Earle F. and Helga M. Spencer. His 
parents live at g Yale street. 

He is a graduate of Belmont High 
School class of 195o. 

_ He applied for enlistment at the 
L'S Army and US Air Force Re- 
cruiting Station, To Pearl street, 
Portland Ma ne 



WINS ADVANCED RATING 



WINCHESTER TOPPED 
STONEHAM 

Winchester High ran its victory 
streak to nine straight games by 
defeating Stoneham High by a 
score of 59 - 4X at the high school 
gym on Tuesday afternoon. This 
was a very good Stoneham team 
an 1 the Led and Black was exten- 
ded to tin' limit to pull out a vic- 
tory in the last half. In spite of 
a slow start the locals continued 
to score well but they did not turn 
in their customary strong defensive 
game as Stoneham tied tin- mark 
for the highest number of points 
scored against Winchester this sea- 
son. 

With Stoneham employing a 
tight zone defense the game started 
slowly as the visitors led 12-11 at 
the end of the first period. The 
Red and Black was hard pressed to 
shake Stoneham and left the floor 
with only a 25 - 2:1 lead at the in- 
termission. Winchester enjoyed 
its largest scoring bulge in the 
third quarter as the locals went 
ahead 38-30 at the end of that 
period. Three more points were 
added to the Winchester margin in 
the last quarter as the Red and 
Black outscored the Blue and 
White 21 - IS in a free scoring final 
period. 

The ability to control the back 
boards was the big factor in the 
Winchester victory as Doug Haw- 
kins and Bod Long did yeoman 
work in sweeping both boards. Be- 
cause of their ability to gather in 
offensive rebounds this tall pair 
both scored in double figures. 
Stowell Symmes paced the Win- 
chester scoring with 15 points as 
he contributed some nice set shoot- 
ting along with three driving-in 
shots for lay tips that were beau- 
ties. Winchester continued to 
shoot well as they made good on 
35 per cent of their attempts from 
the tb. nr. The Stoneham passing 
combination in football of Picano 
to Casey showed to good advantage 
on the court as they carried a 
major part of the offensive load for 
the visitors. 

The Winchester Seconds again 
looked impressive in burying the 
Stoneham Seconds under a 70-17 
score. Bob Forester with 17 points, 
John Atkinson with 14, and Fran 
Murphy with 13 points were the 
high scorers for Winchester as ail 
of the Bed and Black Seconds took 
part in the scoring. 

Winrhester High 

rtit . • ii * ' 

111 I, n il i, If ;[ i 7 

Symmes. rf 7 1 J5 

Hawkins, n -, 2 1'J 

Khim-cII. la 1 I it 

bun*, i! g 1 11 

f or, iter. Ik 1 0 •> 

Mui'iihy, i>g | j j 



1 7 5U 

r f pts. 

:( 0 H 

1 11 J 

1 2 4 

1 1 :( 

t 4 12 



Kdwaid H. Ayer, USN. of Win- 
chester, Mass.. was recently ad- 
vanced in rating to torpedoman's 
mate, third class, as a result of 
having passed a fleet-wide competi- 
tive examination. 

Ayer is serving aboard the USS 
Remora, one of the Navy's latest 
guppy-snorkel type submarines, 
based at San Diego, California. 

Ayer enured the Naval service 
in October, 1945. 




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WRONG COLLECTION 



The Boy Scouts recently had a 
paper drive in town, with many 
residents putting out papers for 
the boys to pick up. 

Last Saturday a resident of 
Main street reported that a youth 
who was certainly not a Boy Scout, 
had picked up papers in front of 
his house and driven off in an auto- 
mobile toward Medford. 

The police checked the number of 
the machine and in response to a 
call, a Medford boy reported at 



Headquarters, admitting he had 
picked up the papers in question. 
He said he was collecting for a 
Medford Church and had been in- 
vited to come to Winchester to col- 
lect some papers in the center. 

On his way back to Medford he 
noticed the papers at the side of 
the road and decided to pick them 
up too. 

The youth offered to return the 
papers, but the owner, when given 
the story decided to let him keep 
them. There were no hard feelings 
when everything was over with. 



$40 PER WEEK FOR 
FEDERAL TAXES ALONE 

In give an idea of t In* astronomical proportions of Hit* 
proposed $71.6 billion federal budget, the following com- 
parison i« offered: If Boston's share were levied a- a property 
tax it would mean a tax rate of about $260 per thousand of 
valuation on lop of the city present lax rate in exec-- of Soil 
per thousand for municipal purposes! 

Or ajiain: Figured on a per capita basis it mean, that 
tbe average breadw inner, of average ineomc, with an average 
-i/e famih of four, would pay $2.07."i.n8 a year as his share 
of lb.- federal budget request - or about S Ml a week out 
of the already bard bit family budget! 



{ Learn How To Make 

J CERAMIC JEWELRY & ART POTTERY 

) in six lessons at Sl.2.1 per lesson 

{ tools and material, included 

{ Also 

{ Mold and Glaze-Making plus 

! instruction in work with 

| Potters Wheel 

i by 

The Roman Potter 

, Mr. Frank Cacciagrani 

$2.00 per lesson for ten le— on- 

i 0AKES CERAMIC STUDIO ! 

j IK I Franklin Melrose Tel. ML MO: j 



Marriage intentions have been 
tiled with the town clerk by Bernard 
Clifford Hanson, 41 Dunster Lane, 
and Lorraine Marv deLong, 35 



MEDFORD 
ORTHOPEDIC NURSING ( ARE 

"Your Hospital With Home Atmosphere" 
82 Brooks Street. West Medford Tel. MYstie 6-0194 

\< nr It inchesti'r /./ne 

Specializing in treatment of Orthopedic Patient-, but 
Catering to all types of Cases Ke.p,i r inc Trained Nursing. 

Stair includes Kegi-tercd Nurses. Physical Therapist, 
Graduate Dietitian and all Trained Nurse- in 21 hour at^ 
tendance. 

Dorothy C. Walker, RN, P.T.T., Director 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 19. 1951 



5 



CLASSIFIED 

FOR SALE 



CLrck St 



JAMES H. NOON AN 



ervicei 



KOR SAI.K *; f\ Frigid*! re, |,rao- 
'.ically new, u»e<l .i months, perfect condi- 
tion. Call Friday or Saturday. WI 6-1 080-W 



SI NT) A V. JAM ARY 21. 19.'>1 



FOR SALE 

good condition 
6-2442-J 



IlrtO Ford convertible in 
Hoatei - ( all Winchester 



IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
CATHOLIC ( HI RCH 



SI. MART'S CHl'RCH 



FOR SALE — 1946 Ford will 1..- sacri- 
ficed for 1 150. OH this v..-«k. loo H. I*. He- 1 
bjilt motor, new battery, clutch, throw-out : 
bearing, starter mechanism. Call WI >■• 
2I15-J evenings. Alt 5-7628 days. 

FOR SALE - Large, graceful, flat-top. 
kneehole mahogany desk, drawers, claw 
and ball feet, 54 inches b> :•:> inches, 180. 
Very old French horizontal mirror, nods ! 
reflnUhint »25. fall M El rose 4-:*I76. 



Rev. Herbert K. A. Driscoll. Pastor 
' Rev. Stephen E. Burke 

Masses at 7, 8:45. 10 and 11:15. 



Rev. John P. O'Riordan, Pastor 

Assistants: Rev. Charles Anadore, 
Rev. Frsncis ONeil and Rev. William 
Walsh. 



THE LLTHERAN CHL'RCH OK 
THE REDEEMER 



Masses at '. 9. 10, 11 and 11:50 a. m. 
Sunday School after the 9 o'clock Mass. 



Montvale Ave., Woburn 



FOR SALE 



Easy washing machine. 



Rev. Ralph Hjelm, Pa»tor 
Kes. lis Montvale Avenue 
Tel. WO 2-:'.077 



NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHL'RCH 



spin-dryer, $35 also (IE refrigerator, $25. Morning Worship - 11:0m A. M. 
Call WI 6-07MJ • Church School - 9:45 A. M. 



Rfv. Virgesa Hill. Pastor. 

SO Pleasant View Avenue. Everett. 
Tel. EVerett 3-0826-M. 

10:45 a. m. Morning Service. 



CRAWFORD MEMORIAL METHODIST 
CHURCH 



FOR S'Al.E Hoover vacuum and at- 
tachment*, only five years old, A-l condi- 
tion. $25. Call WI B-0552 • 



FOR SALE Mahogan) dining table, 
buff.-t. sideboard and 8 chairs. Call WI 
0|.j7 



FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST 
SCIENTIST. WINCHESTER 



FOR SALE Hotpoint electric stove 
515. 1 oven-4 burners, also love seat wal- 
nut hand made frame, dark green velvet, 
down cushion. $60. Call WI 8-1751-.! 



FOR SALE Well seasoned fireplace 
wood mostly oak. Drawl's Poultry Farm. 
WO 2-2391 - 2-0452 janl2-4f 



Sunday Services at 11 a. m. 

Sunday School is held at the same hour 
as the church service. 

Wednesday testimonial meeting 8 p. m. 

Heading room, 5 Winchester Terrace 
Miff Thompson Street i. Open daily ex- 
cept Sundays and holidays from 11 a. m. 
to 4 p. in. 



FOR SALE — Rebuilt washing machine 
and electric refrigerators, standard reliable 
makes only, (lahm and Erickson Co., Inc. 
lis Mass. Ave., Arlington. Tel. ARlington 
6-432.) d9-tf 

FIREPLACE WOOD FOR SALE — 

Mostly oak, well seasoned, cut any length, 
delivered to cellar, also kindling for sale. 
J. C. Walker, WAyland, 118 Ring 3. 

aeptS-tf 



WANTED 



WANTED Urgentb need garage near 
Winchester Chambers. Call WI ii-1079 

WANTED Russell .1 Taylor, well 
known Winchester paperhnnget' an.l inside 
painter wishes to add some new customers 
to his list. For expert workmanship call 
W I R-0S79-W j«rtl9-2l* 



WANTED Mothers of school children 
or babies. I can cure for children from 10 
A M. to * V. M on Moii.. Tues.. Wed.. 
Thiirs., Sat,, no housework included $1.00 
per hour WI ll.irTiiii.R Tn\ included 
i Trans, r.ee etl also < Will go for short 
period*, also * 

POSITION WANTED — Profession*: 
woman, who is a registered nurse, with 
hospital experience in dietetics, would like 
position as companion, or nurse compan- 
ion. Free to travel. Address Star Office. 
Uox J-17. 



Cod. the infinite Life who maintains all 
creation, including every individual in his 
true selfhood, will be the topic of all 
Christian Science services next Sunday 
Subject of the Lesson-Sermon U "Life." 

The declaration of John constitutes the 
(iolden Text. "Thta is the record, that 
God hath given to us eternal life, and this 
life is in his Son" i! John Sill). 

Readings from the Bible 'King James 
I Version ine'udes Christ Jesus' statement 
"f his mission: "I am come a light into the 
world, that whosoever believeth on me 
■dtould not abide in darkness . . . For I 
have not spoken of myself, but the Father 
which sent me. he gave me a command- 
ment, what 1 shoud say. and what I should 
-peak. And I know that his commandment 
i, life everlasting:" (John 12:46,4H,5ui. 
Selections from "Science and Health with 
, Kej to the Scripture-.'" by Mary linker Eddy 
Include the following: 'The fact that the 
. Christ, or Truth, overcome and still over- 
I conn - death proves the 'king of terrors' to 
: be but a mortal belief, or error, which 
i Truth destroys with the spiritual evidences 
of Life, and this shows that what appears 
! to the senses to be death is but a mortal 
illusion, for to the real man and the real 
' universe there is no death-process" ip. 
|2s!n. . . . Cod. Life, Truth, and Love make 
man undying" ip. 427 1 - 



A FRIENDLY CHL'RCH AT THE 
FORK OF THE ROAD 



Rev. John Snook. Jr.. Minister. Resi- 
dence 30 Dix St. • 6-0139. 

W. Raymond Chase, General Supt. 
of the Sunday School 155 Cambridge St., 
6-.14SS 

Mr. Chirles P. Putter. Organist and 



Choir Director 

Morning Service - 10:45 a. m 

Sunday School 

9:30 a. m. - Junior and 
Depts. 

10:45 a. m. - Nursery. Kindergarten, 
and Primary Depls. 



Intermediate 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 



RENTAL WANTED — 7. or more, room 
house, in good residential section, Highland 
avenue district preferred, for adult fami- 
ly. Write Star Office Uox L-26. dec2«-4t' 



Antiques Wanted 

Call Mr. Reebenacker 

A Reliable Dealer 
REading 2-1991 



sept29-tf 



Corner Mt. Vernon and Washington 
streets. 

Rev. Walter Lee Bailey, Minister. 
Residence: 15 Fairmount Street, 
phone Winchester 6-042?. 



Tele- 



W. Lawrence Cook Organist and Director 
of Senior and Youth Choirs 

Mrs Dana R. Perkins, Soloist and 
Director of Junior Choir 

John Hunt Chappie, Youth Director 
• • • 

Mrs H. Stanley Kinsley. Church School 
Superintendent. 

Church Offire hours : 

Tues lay and Wednesday mornings. 

Telephone Winchester (1-2804. At other 
limes call Mis. L. E. Leavitt, WI (5-3002. 



At the morning service the pastor will 
• peak on the subject, "Signs on the High- 
way of Life." 

At the Youth Fellowship. Harold Quigley 
will lead in a discission from the Meth- 
odist Highroad magazine entitled. Heaven. 
Hell and the Devil." All of the young peo- 
ple of the church and friends are invited 
to attend. 
This Week 

Monday 

7. no P. M. - Married Couples' Club Bowl- 
ing Night at the Center Rowling Alleys in 
town. (Winchester Place. All married 
couples cordia'Iv invited. 

Monday 

vim I' M. - Meeting of the Olive Group 
at the home of Mrs. Erne>t Sellers, 02 Mid- 
dlesex Street. 

I- Id 'ay 

7.::» I'. M. - Choir Rehearsal 
■ .unking Ahead 

Sunday. January 28 

5:00 I'. M. Tin' Pastor's Associates will 
meet for fellowship, refreshments and plan- 
ning for a Personal Visitation Program. 
Please keep this Important date open. 

Wednesday. February 7 

Ash Wednesday service at the Episcopal 
Church. 

Sunday. February 11 

There will he a reception of new mem- 
bers. Those who desire to affiliate them- 
selves with the church and have not 
spoken to the pastor, please call him at 
any time - WI 6-0139 



SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Wiishlngton St. at Kcnwin Rd. 
Rev. John William Cook. Minister 
Id Kcnwin Road 
Tel. W! 6-0756- W 
Chi rch Study, WI 6-1688 
Mis. George Lochmnn, Organist 



•akfast Speak- 



MISCELLANEOUS 

DOMESTIC HELP Full or part time 
domestic help. Nurses' Registry, Dennison 
Home Service ST 8-1407-M. janl2-4f 

SAGGING SPRINGS — In upholstered 
furniture seats repaired and completely 
restored to original position with SAG 
PRUF Work done in your home. Divan 
$20 75; chair, $9.76. Written Lifetime 
guarantee. Quality Upholstering since 
1901. R. L. Wicks & Sons Co. Call 
BEL 5-0991 jy9-tf 

UPHOLSTERING * CANE SEATING — 

For expert work of all kinds. Cal. Miss 
Davis, WI 6-05 16-M (formerly Hobby & 
Craft Nook i or 1; & S Upholstery Co. AR1. 
5-1818 ja6-tf 

HELP — For the Problem Drinker! 
There is a way out! Alcoholics Anonymous 
can show you! Write P. O. Box 168. Win- 
chester. ja20-tf 



Sunday, January 21 

s ;4(i a m. Brotherhood B 
er : Dr. Forbes Norris. 

9:30 a. m Church School. 

10:45 a. m. Nursery ami Kindergarten. 

10:45 a m. Morning Sanctuary Service. 
Sermon h> Mr. Bailey) ' Where on Earth 
is Cod"" 

6:30 ii. m. Youth Fellowship. Mr Allen 
Tinkhnm. a senior at Tufts College, will 
tell of some of his exciting experiences a- a 
fire watcher and fighter for the govern- 
ment in the Northern section of the Rocky 
Mountains. Worship service in charge of 
.lames Kkstrom and Philip Dresser Re- 
freshments in chalge of Emily Allen and 

Madelon Nelson. 

Monday. January 22 

7:ii() p. m. Boy Scouts. Troop 7, in Re- 
creation Hall. 

Tuesday. January 2:: 

7:45 p. m. Executive Committee Meet- 
ing in Church Parlor. Correlation meeting 
of program for the remainder of the church 

year. 

Thursday, Jnn'-ftry 25 
11:43 p. m. Youth Choir rehearsal. 
7 :30 ii. m. Senior Choir rehearsal. 
Friday, January 20 

7 s00 p. m. "Fun-Nite" for Junior High 
and Senior High group 



j Sunday. January 21 

9:45 a pi. Church School. Mrs. Rony 
' Snyder, superintendent. Classes for ages 

i M to 2::. 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship Mr. Cook 
will preach. 

6:30 |i. m, The Youth Croup will meet 
ai the church. 
Activities for the Week: 

Thursday. January 25 

7:00 p. m The Chancel Choir will re- 
hearse at the church. 

>:'»0 p. ni. Mr Willis Miller will present 
ji program of magic and ventriloquism. 
Benefit . Pars. mage Fund. 

Friday. January 20 

3:30 p. m. The Junior Choir will re- 
hearse n( the church. 

8:00 p. m. Y'outh Croup party at the 
church 

t nmine Events : 

February 1. Bible study Group 
February •>. Bethany dessert and meet- 
ing 

February 7. Ash Wednesday. Beginning of 
Union Lenten Services. 

February 8, Adult Croup. 

February 16, Church and Prudential Com- 
mittees. 



CHl'RCH OF THE EPIPHANY 



TRAVEL INFORMATION — For reser- 
vations on Airplanes, Ships, Trains, and 
at Hotels anywhere in the United States 
or foreign countries. Call your Author- 
ized Travel Agent. J. !' McCrath, Jr.. 
Travel Service. WOburn 2-1234 or Win- 
chester 6-3130. nl9-tf 

WEDDINt; I \ KES When you want a 
real nice one. or a birthday cake that will 
thrill you. call a studio that makes a 
specialty of only the best in party cakes 
of any kind Delivery can he made. Tel. 
Em lie Marquis. 811 Central street, Woburn. 
WOburn 2-177H fii-tf 

HELP WANTED 



FIRST f-ONGRECATIONAL CHURCH 
110 Yeurs of Service to Winchester 

Rev Howard J. Chidley, D. D. Minister. 
Residence. Fernvvay. 

Rev. Donald B. Tnrr, S T. B . Assistant 
and Director of Religious Education. WI 8- 

1 056 

.1 Albert Wilson. Organist and Choir- 
master Tel. MYstic 8-4972, 

Mrs James F. Canning. Church Sec- 
retary. WI G-032H. 

Mrs. Donald B. Tnrr. B. S Assistant Di- 
rector of Religions Education ; Secretary. 
Church School. WI 6-1056 

Miss I'.lise A Belcher. Executive Hostess 
Church. WI 6-1786: Home. WI 6-1545-W 



Rev. Dwight W. Hndlev. Rector. Rer- 
torv, 3 Glengarry. Tel. Winchester 6-1264. 
Parish Home. Tel. Winchester 6-1922. 



WANTED Man for full or part tim. 
work in gas station. Tel WI 6-0102, 



TO LET 



FOR RENT Garage, vicinity of Mary- 
cliff and Parkhurst district $s per month 
Tei. WI 6-2. '.22 -W 

FOR RENT Garage at ;7s Washing- 
ton St. Cull WI 6-2404-W 



FOR RENT Sunny room on bathroom 
floor - near center - Business man or 
woman preferred - WI 6-1545-W janl9-2t 

FOR RENT Very nice room ami 

hath for right person Good neighborhood - 
near transportation. WI 6-2093-R • 

FOR RENT A suite of 2 con -rooms 
with bath - suitable for light housekeeping - 
near transportation. Price with electricity , 
hot water. 2 heat - $60.00 per month. Write 
Star Office Box I.-l? • 

FOR RENT - Furnished room with or 
without kitchen privileges, use of refri- 
gerator, car space available. Call WI o- 



BON NELLS LEADING TOWN 
LEAGUE 



After several weeks of competi- 
tion the Town Basketball League is 
tommencinp to take form, with 
last year's champions. Bunnell 
Motors, pacing the six-team cir- 
cuit with eight wins in nine starts. 

Rotary and Mercurio Insurance 
are tied for second place with seven 
and two ratings, followed by Sons 
tit Italy. Bullets and the All' Stars, 
with the latter outfit yet to win its 
first game. 

Following is the standing: 

Team Won Lost 

Bonnells 8 1 

Rotary 7 2 

Mercurio 7 2 

S. O. 1. 3 H 

Bullets 2 7 

Ali Stars o ;i 



Next Sunday morning, at 10 :45, Dr Chid- 
ley will preach on "The Land of the Sky." 
Children will be presented for baptism, The 
Junior Choir will sing. 

Churrh School Hours 

Intermediate and Junior High Depart- 
ments at 0:30: Nursery. Kindergarten, 
Primary, and Junior Departments at 10:45. 

Senior Forum at 0:30, Dorothy Parker. 
Louise Kugler, Gordon Bird. Jr.. and Berta 
June Tonoti. F'oruni members, will present 
problems of migrant families in oi r coun- 
try and needs of the Near East. 

Events of the Week 

Monda v 

7:00 P M. - Troop III. Boy Scout Meet- 
itlg in Parish Hall. 

7:45 P. M. - Parish Players' Rehearsal 
in Kindergarten Room 

Tuesday 

l(i:oo A. M. - Social Service Guild Sew- 
ing in Kindergarten Room 

2 'On P. M. - W omen'.- Association Meet- 
ing in Social Hall. 

Wed nesdny 

11:30 P. M - Annual Church Supper and 
Meeting. 
Thursday 

2:30 P. M. - Girl Scout Meeting in Small 
Parish Hall 

7 IV M - Cutis in Parish Hall. 

7 :!.'. P. M - Senior Choir Rehearsal. 
Friday 

7:4."i P. M. - Parish Players' Rehearsal in 
Kindergarten Knots. 
Saturday 

9:00 A M - Junior Choir Rehearsal 
6:15 P. M - International Supper for 
Forum members and advisors, and foreign, 

guests. 



Sunday . January 23 

" a. hi Holy Communion, i Corporate 

communion of the Young People's Fellow. 

ship followed by breakfast. [ 

0:30 a m, Church School. (Tipper School i 
li no a m, Morning Prayer and Sermon 
11:00 a. m. Kindergarten and Primary 

Department 

Tuesday. January 23 

Holy Communion. Sewing, Surgical Dres- 
sings Church World Service 

12:30 p. m. Luncheon. 

Speaker Mrs Charlotte R. Fit?.. Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Seamen's Club. 

Wednesday. January 24 

7:48 p m. \nnunl Parish Meeting. Elec- 
tion of Officer- 



(ABO OI- THANKS 



WINCHESTER UNITARIAN CHl'RCH 
Mystic Valley Parkway and Main Street 



Robert A. Storer. Minister 
Mrs Mary Ranton Witham, Director of 
Music and Organist 

Mrs Walter Snialley. Church Secretary. 
Church Telephone - Winchester 6-0949 



The family of the late Mary 
(McGuire) Cullen wish to sincerely 
thank their relatives, neighbors 
and friends for their many acts of 
kindness and thoughtfulness in our 
recent bereavement. We grate- 
fully acknowledge the numerous 
spiritual bouquets and floral trib- 
utes sent in her memory. 

We wish to thank also the fol- 
lowing groups: Employees of Wild- 
wood Cemetery, .1. H. Winn Suns, 
Janitors and Cafeteria Employees 
of Winchester High School. Win- 
chester Branch of Brigham's. 
Brown's Restaurant, Immaculate 
Conception Girls' Bowling League, 
Winchester Hospital Staff. Win- 
chester Rotary Club, Winchester 
Fire Department. Winchester 
Police Department, Winchester 
Highway Department, Friends of 
the Woburn District Court. Middle- 
sex County Commissioners and the 
Maintenance Group of the Fast 
Cambridge Courthouse for their 
kindness to us. 

James Cullen and Family. 

CHILDREN'S CONCERT AT 
H \KVAKD 



James H. Noonan of 27 Sheridan 
Circle, retired Highway Depart- 
ment employee and former Fire 
Captain, died Friday, January 12, 
at 4i is home after a short illness. 
He sustained a broken hip four 
years ago and had been confined to 
his home since the accident, but his 
last illness was of less than a 
week's duration. 

Mr. Noonan was a life-long resi- 
dent of Winchester. Son of Pat- 
rick, and Marguerite (Neary) 
Noonan, he was born in Winches- 
ter, May 2, 18(54, and as a boy lived 
on what was later the Ginn Estate, 
then owned by the Cunningham 
family, by whom his father was 
employed as a care-taker. Later 
>. he lived in one of two houses on 
the point of land beyond Sandy 
Beach at the aqueduct at the south 
end of upper Mystic Lake, then 
called "Bacon's Pond". 

After completing his schooling in 
the town schools, Mr. Noonan 
worked at Bacon's Felt Mill until 
be entered the town's service in 
1892. On May 2 of that year he 
was appointed the first permanent 
fireman in Winchester, serving at 
the old tire station on Winchester 
Place. In those days Highway 
Department horses drew the fire 
apparatus, and Mr. Noonan drove 
the old hook-and-ladder. He rose 
to the rank of captain, being the 
first in the department to hold that 
rank. He remained in the depart- 
ment until 1911 when he was forced 
to withdraw because of illness. 

Before becoming a permanent 
member of the Fire Department 
Mr. Noonan was a call fireman as 
early as 1888, running with P. 
Waldmyer Hose 1, of which he 
later became foreman. 

Upon leaving the Fire Depart- 
ment he joined the Highway De- 
partment, in which he was em- 
ployed for 25 years until his retire- 
ment January 1, 1936, latterly as 
a utility man. He was a familiar 
figure to many motorists as he 
painted the white traffic lines in 
the center and about town, his 
friendly smile and invariable good 
nature winning him friends among 
persons of till walks in life. 

Mi. Xoonan was always active in 
the work of his parish church. As 
a boy be was confirmed in St. 
Charles Church, Woburn, there be- 
ing no Roman Catholic Church in 
Winchester in those days. Later 
when St. Mary's Parish was estab- 
lished he was active in its work, as- 
sisting at the annual field days for 
many years and often participating 
in the old time parish minstrel 
shows. II,. was a member of St. 
Mate's Holy Name Society and 
later, when the Immaculate Con- 
ception Parish was established, he 
became identified with its Society, 
transferring his active church in- 
terest from St. Mary's to the new- 
parish. 

Mr. Noonan married Mary A. 
Sullivan of Woburn, June 27, 1894, 
and in 1911 they celebrated their 
Golden Wedding Anniversary. He 
leaves his wife, two daughters, 
Mrs. Leona O'Sullivan of Maiden 
and Miss Marion C. Noonan of 
Winchester; three sons, Captain J. 
Edward Noonan of the Fire De- 
partment, Patrolman James F. 
Noonan of the Police Department 
and C. Norman Noonan, all of Win- 
chester; seven grandchildren and 
three great-grandchildren. An- 
other son, the late Police Sgt. John 
II. Noonan, died October 23, 1934. 

The funeral was held Monday 
morning from the late residence 
with solemn requiem high mass 
celebrated at the Immaculate Con- 
ception Church. The pastor, Rev. 
Fr. Herbert K. A. Driscoll was 
celebrant, Rev. Fr, Francis O'Neil 
of St. Mary's Church was deacon, 
and Rev. Fr. Charles Anadore, also 
ni' St Mary's was subdeaeon. 

Seated in the san.tuary were Rt. 
Rev. Msgr. James F. Fitzsimons, 
pastor of St. Anne's Church, Ne- 
ponset, first pastor of the Imma- 
culate Conception Parish and Rev. 
Fr. John J Sheehan of the An- 
nunciation Palish, Danvers, for- 
mer Immaculate Conception curate. 

Delegations from both the Fire 
Department and Police Depart- 
ment attended the mass, headed by 
their chiefs, James K. Callahan and 
Charles J. Harrold. There were 
also a delegation from the Mass- 
achusetts Department of Conser- 
vation and two Marist Sisters from 
Framingham Center. Sister Marv 
Richards, S. M. S. M., and Sister 
Mary Germaine, S. M. S. M. Mr. 
Noonan's daughters are members 
of the Alofa Malia Club, the offi- 
cial lay auxiliary of the Marist 
Missionary Sisters. 

Burial was in the Noonan family 
lot at Calvary Cemetery where the 
committal prayers were read by 
Monsignor Fitzsimons, Father 
Sheehan and Father Driscoll. 

MBS. HARRIET TUFTS HILL 



ALEC TEMPLETON CONCERT 

Alec Templeton, pianist, gave 
the second concert of the Com- 
munity Concert Association's cur- 
rent season at the high school audi- 
torium Tuesday evening under the 
auspices of the Smith College Club, 
playing to an overflow audience 
that progressed from cordiality to 
enthusiastic approval as the inter- 
esting program unfolded. 

The first half of the program was 
devoted to serious music by Lully, 
Couperin. Milhaud and Vaughan 
Williams with the Mozart Fantasia 
in I) Minor, the Chromatic Fantasy 
and Fugue by Johann Sebastian 
Bach, two Chopin scores, the D 
Flat Nocturne and the Etude in A 
Flat, Opus 25, No. 1; Debussy's Les 
Danseuses de Delpes and Les Voiles 
from Preludes, First Set; and a 
Templeton arrangement o f Ex- 
cerpts from "Dei- Bosenkavalier" 
by Strauss. 

After intermission the music 
lightened to encompass those de- 
lightful little Templeton drolleries 
that are so entertaining and pecu- 
liarly his own. Opening with the 
artist's conception of tinkling 
music as played by an old world 
instrument, possibly a music-box, 
these numbers included Berceuse in 
Blue, part blues and part salon 
music; and "Scarlatti Stoops to 
Conga," in which the composer's 
pure sonata form was punctuated 
with what Mr. Templeton humor- 
ously discribed as a "one-two-three, 
kick!" 

Closing the program were Five- 
Note Theme in Style of Composers. 
Conversation Between two Vans 
a n d Improvisation on Four 
Melodies. 

Mr. Templeton is first of all, of 
course, a sound musician with a 
mastery of the skills a fine pianist 
needs. His tone is pleasantly firm 
and musical, even in his forzandos 
and his playing is clean cut and 
articulate in the fastest runs and 
arpeggio passages Never do you 
get the impression that Mr. Tem- 
pleton is concerned particularly 
with the ornimentation of a piece, 
though his mastery of technique 
enables hirn to cope with the most 
difficult scores. Nor does he suf- 
fer in the more contemplative 
music like Soeur Monique by 
Couperin. the Chopin Nocturne and 
the Slow Air from "Charterhouse 
Suite" by Vaughan Williams. His 
playing of Debussy indicated care- 
ful study and a profound regard for 
the Composer's story, while the 
Bosenkavalier "excerpts" were 
nicely chosen and skillfully ar- 
ranged, both for Strauss and Tem- 
pleton. 

lilting three-four time 
in encore and Mr. Tern- 
sporuled with George 
Second Prelude, 
luring the final three 
the program that Mr. 




"Spend Less 
Than You Get" 

was one of the sayings of Benjamin Franklin, whose 
birthday on January 17 is commemorated by Thrift 
Week. Many things have changed since Franklin 
wrote his famous maxims, but old-fashioned thrift 
is still as important as ever. 

Make this a year of thrift. Budget your ex- 
penses — live within your income — put something 
aside for the future. Open a Savings Account at 
the Winchester Trust Company and increase it with, 
regular deposits. 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 

W inchester Trust Company 

35 CHURCH STREET • 16 MT. VERNON ST. 

WINCHESTER. MASSACHUSETTS 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 
MEMBER FEOERAL RESCRVI SYSTEM 

BANKING HOURS: 8 A. M. to 2 P. M. 
Except Wednesday and Saturday 8 A. M. to 12 Noon 



aus 

fo 



Sti 
called 
pleton ics 
Gershwin's 
It was < 
numbers of 



KNIGHT ASSIGNED TO C CO. 

Thomas S. Kmcht. Jr., of 50 Ox- 
ord street, who recently completed 
tie Army process of conversion 
trom a eivilian to military status, 
tias arrived at Fort Dix. N J and 
has beer, assigned t, C Company, 

In 'Lr?. I 1 ! ' V ^* lment . ^ the 9th 
lntantry Division 

He will undergo six weeks of 

physical conditioning at Dix with 

instruction in general militarj - . 

jects and training in smaif arms 

and combat skills Afterwards he 

will move on to an eight-weeks 

course in the second phase of his 

training, either at Dix or in a t., .C" 



s mia> . January it, 19*1 

9:00 A at. Junior Choir - Me tea If Vnion 

Room. 

9;$0 A. M Upper School Worship Ser- 

vnv - Meyer ('hniie!. conducted by llitrh 
School Class 

11 :0" A. M Lower School - Lawraneo 
Ha 

U .-Oil \ M Service of Worship. Sermon : 
"What U A Miracle"" 

Sum 1' M Junior Hiwh Fellowship. Re- 
hearsn! for I,vnten }*la> 

JiOU P M Meiealf Union Meeting Re- 
henrsal for Youth Sundas 

Monday, January -.' 

T no P. M Hoy Scotit.- 

Tueaday. January J; 

10:0 A M. Sewing Ciroup 

Hot luncheon *J noon 

Thursday. Januarv i:, 

? :45 P. M. Meeting of new Drama (iroup 
in the Metcaif I'nior. Ilism!. Open to all 
members and frien Is 
Coming : 

Youth Sunday January it>, 1951 



The Church of the Open Bible 

il/ndcnominationa! 
lord's Day: 9:30 A.M.. Charch-Sehool : 
10:43 A.M.. Worship Service; T:0« 
P.M.. Gospel Service. Rev. 0. Helger- 
snn. Pastor. 

Thursday. 7:43 P.M.. Prayer Meeting. 

Montvale Av«.. Woburn 



On Saturday afternoon, January 
-", the second in a series of un- 
usually interesting concerts for 
children will he held at Harvard 
University, Sanders Theatre. These 
concerts, sponsored hy a group of 
parents and friends of the Shady 
Hill School in Cambridge are at- 
tracting widespread interest and 
support throughout Greater Boston 
and the suburbs. The programs 
have heen arranged hy Josef Zim- 
bier and played hy members Of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra under 
the direction of Richard Burgin 
with Rudolph Klie, Music Critic of 
the Boston Herald, as Comment- 
ator. The program for the con- 
, cert on Januarv 27 will include 
, short works of ( orellif Tansman. 
Vivaldi. Tchaikovsky, Teleman. 
Bolzoni, Rimsky - Korsakov and 
Mozart. 

Among tho.-e from Winchester 
who are attending are: Mrs. Samuel 
B. Kirkwood. who is one of the 
sponsors, Mrs. Ellis J. Green, Mrs. 
Donald K. Lewis. Mrs. R. F. Davis. 



Mrs. Harriet Tufts Hill of 14 
Norwood street, widow of Arron 
Bartlett Hill, died Saturday, Jan- 
uary 13, at her home after a hrief 
illness. She was !»2 years old. 

Mrs. Hill was the daughter of 
Walter, and Harriet Cornelia (Rob- 
inson I Russell. She was horn July 
1.'?, 1858, in Somerville, but spent 
most of her life in Arlington, spend- 
ing her girlhood on her father's ex- 
tensive farm located on Massachu- 
setts avenue and extending south- 
ward from Tufts street. 

Mrs. Hill was educated in the 
Arlington schools and graduated 
from the old l otting High School 
in Arlington. She was married in 
that town, her husband having died 
fifty years ago. For the past 20 
years she had made her home with 
her daughter-in-law. Mrs. Blanche 
K. Hill, in Winchester. She was a 
charter member of the Arlington 
Woman's Club. 

Mrs. Hill leaves a sister. Mis. 
Ella Doty of Arlington; two grand- 
daughters, Mrs. Francis A. McClel- 
lan and Mrs. Charles C. Bond, both 
of Winchester; and six greatgrand- 
children, Donald Hill McClellan. 
Lauren McClellan and Robert Pack- 
ard McClellan, Martha Ellen Bond, 
Charles C. Bond, Jr., and Constance 
King Bond, all of Winchester. 

Private funeral services were 
held Monday afternoon at the Kim- 
ball Chapel with the Rev. Laurence 
L. Barber, retired Arlington clergy- 



Templeton became pure entertain- 
ment, such as his legion of radio 
fans have come to enjoy so much. 

Taking five notes, called out at 
random by the audience, he first 
constructed a theme upon them. 
Then he played the theme in the 

| style o f four composers, again 
chosen by the audience, Schubert, 

Chopin, Bach and Handel. An in- 
dication of what was coming was 

'offered during the fast-moving 
Handel passages when Mr. Temple- 

! ton suddenly burst into coloratura 
singing that was buffo, but definite- 
ly! 

With a "Mike" to aid him the 
artist explained that his "Con- 
versation Between Two Vans" in- 
volved the great Ludwig van 
Beethoven and the equally great, 
though in a different musical field, 
Edgar Van Alstyne. Following the 
explanat ion, Mr. Templeton, who 
seemed to be getting a great "kick" 
out of his work, played a cleverly 
intermingled medley of Beethoven's 
"Minuet" and Van Alstyne's "Old 
Apple Tree." 

For his final number Mr. Tem- 
pleton asked the audience to name 
four melodies, on which he im- 
provised, weaving them together in- 
to a medley-like composition, both 
humorous and musically worth- 
while. "Chop Sticks," the "Min- 
ute Waltz." Mendelssohn's "Spring 
Song" and "The Thing" were 
chosen for this hilarious hit. 

Encores were demanded, literal- 
ly, by the delighted audience, and 
given by the good natured and 
generous artist; four of them! 

First came Mr. Templeton's ludi- 
crous imitation of many baritones' 
singing of "Old Man River." Then 
an operatic contralto's rendition of 
"My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice" 
was contrasted with the same selec- 
tion as B;ng Crosby might sing it. 
The audience was delighted by this 
time and the smiling Mr. Temple- 
ton obliged with "Through the Ring 
in Five Minutes," a side-splitting 
takeoff on the Wagnerian Ring 
Operas, with some very clever 
piano playing accompanying the 
vocal pyrotechnics. 

Waves of spontaneous laughter 
swept all the way through this 
ridiculous gem, which your reviewer 
thought the best of the lot. A Jive 
performance of Irving Berlin's 
sweet tune. "Marie," followed the 
operatic tenors and sopranos, and 
finally brought up the lights on an 
audience loth to part with their 
favorite. 

Your reviewer has mentioned the 
crowd. He sat, because of it. in the 
balcony near the side windows and 
can whole-heartedly recommend 
this location to anyone hankering 
for a slow death by freezing! 

EPIPHANY TO HEAR FROM 
SEAMEN'S CLUB 

At 18i) Federal street in Boston 
is the Seamen's Club which wel- 
comes all seamen of any denomina- 
tion and nationality. The 500 
Christmas cards expressing their 
senders' appreciation which were 
received by the ('lub's Manager this 
year may serve as an indication of 
its value. The Seamen's Club is 
run by the City Mission of the 
Episcopal Church, and the Parish 
of the Epiphany, as a member, will 
hear more of its work from Mrs. 
Charlotte R. Fitz, the Executive 
Secretary of the Women's Aid of 
the Seamen's Club of Boston, after 
lunch at the Parish House on Tues- 
day, January 2'i. Everyone is wel- 
come. 



GUILD OF THE INFANT 
SAVIOUR 

A large number of our members 
and friends turned out for our first 
social event of the new year, the 
Dessert Bridge Party held at the 
Town Line in Woburn on Thursday, 
January 11th. In addition to the 
many beautiful bridge prizes there 
were a number of very choice 
prizes on chances and the lucky 
winners were Mrs. George W. 
Kitchen, Mrs. John l.ennon, Mrs. 
William A. Dolan, Mrs. Manlino G. 
Moffett ami Mrs. B. Robert Finn. 

Our next meeting will be a reg- 
ular sewing meeting on Tuesday, 
January 'JUrd, and this will be held 
at Masonic Hall starting promptly 
at 2 p. m. Please plan to attend. 

It is with deep sadness that we 
tiote the passinir of one of our be- 
loved members, our Vice-President, 
Mrs. John J. Costello. Frances had 
been associated with the Guild for 
a great many years, being one of 
the original founders of the Win- 
chester Chapter of the Guild of the 
Infant Saviour. She will he sorely 
missed but her many charities and 
good work will live long after her. 



Monday shortly after two o'clock 
in the morning the Cambridge 
police reported that the Ford sedan, 
owned by Salvatore Buzzotta of 57 
Oak street, and previously reported 
as stolen in Cambridge, had been 
recovered by the Metropolitan 
Police of the Basin Station. 



DRESSMAKING 

LI LU \N \\ . SCOTT 

Men's and Women's 
Alterations and Repairs 

WOburn 2-0676-W 
8 Garfield Avenue 
Woburn, Mass. 



LANE TAXI 
SERVICE 

Local and distance trips 

Call Winchester 6-2580 



Appliance Repair Service 

Lamps Rewired - Electric 
Irons Repaired Toasters 
Repaired Hot Plates Re- 
wired, etc. 

Tel. K. R, \\ H.I.IAMS 
Winchester «- 



WEDDING GOWNS 

Exclusive creations. Beauti- 
ful workmanship. Made to 
order, ready to wear, also 
bridesmaids gowns. 

SERI G EI. EN IAN 

■' Ravine Rnad. WeM MedfnrH 



FOR ALL 

Automobile repairs on all make* 
of ears, call 

Christian W. Eriksen 

20 Grove Place. Winrheater 
WI 6-3192 

Specializing on Huicks and 
General Motur cars. 

decS-tf 



FIREPLACE WOOD 

LOAM — MANURE 
Asphalt Driveways 
Chimney Repairing and 
Masonwork 

J. A. COSTANZA 
MElrose 4-7*12 nov-n-tf 



FLOORS 

NEW FLOORS LAID 
OLD ONES RESURFACED 

MERENDA FLOOR CO. 

Tel. Winchester 6-1774 or 
Winchester 6-3123 



Harvey's Barber Shop 

Plenty of Parking Space 

Winchester Place 

opposite Police Station 

fS-tf 



- CARPENTER 



MOFFETT 

TAXI SER VICE 

Winchester 6-1730 

m»lS-tf 



GALUFF0 S TAXI 

Weddings and Long Trips 
Special Rates 

TEL. WI 6-0602 

mal3-tf 



ALLEN S TAXI 

PROMPT DEPENDABLE 
SEKVICE 

Call Winchester 6-0792 

aeptl-tf 



THE NEW 

WINCHESTER CAB 
TAXI 

Local and Long Distance 
24 — HOUR SERVICE 

Earl C. Jordan 

Phones 
Days - 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Winchester 6-1931 

Nights - Sundavs - Holidays 
Winchester 6-35S3 

octft-tf 




Dr. Ruth A. Boule 



Chiropodist — Podiatrist 

SO VINE ST. WINCHESTKB 
loppoaite Wincheater Thcatra) 
Hours by Appointment Only 

Tel. Winchester 6-1989 



WILLIAM BLANCHARD 

CO., INC. 
Awnings Tents 
Venetians Blinds Shades 
Tel. CRystal 9-0379 
456 Main St., Wakefield^ 



Specializing in small home 
repairs 
ROY W. WILSON 
5 Cliff St WI 6-0480-W 

aept29-tf 



EMBASSY HAND 
LAUNDRY 

Complete Laundry and 
Dry Cleaning Service 

595 Main Street 

Same Building as First N'at'l. 
Store Super Market 

For delivery call WI 6-2220 
aept8-tf 



Thomas Quigley, Jr. 

CONTRACTORS 
CEMENT AND STONE MASON 
MOTOR TRANSPORTATION 
Power Shovel Air Compreaaor 

Road Roller Urillins 

Concrete Mixer Blaatinc 
Tractor Rock Excaeatlac 



WINCHESTER'S 

JUNK DEALER 

HIGHEST PRICES PAID 

Call Ed. Murphy 

TEL WI 6-1346-M 



MACEFIELO 

band wrought 
jewelry and silver 
10 Winchester place 
wi 6-2989 

iti-ti 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1951 



II THERE WERE NO MARCH 
OF DIMES 



If there- were no March of Dimes 
campaign in 1951, what would it 
mean? It is difficult to conceive of 
a more tragic happening, but if 
there were no .March of Dimes this 
year, there could be no National 
Foundation foi Infantile Paralysis. 
There are no patient care reserves 
at National Headquarters. Many 
Chapter treasuries, including our 
own Middlesex County chapter, are 
not only completely devoid of 
funds, but will be in the red until 
your contributions to the current 
March (if Dimes campaign made it 
possible to pay bills. The position 
of the remaining Chapters is ex- 
tremely precarious, dependent en- 
tirely upon one unpredictable, un- 
controllable element, that of the 
force of the polio attack in the year 

to come. 

How does it happen 'hat there 
are not enough funds available to 
keep the National Foundation and 
local chapters alive when la^t year 
you and millions of Americans 
gave a record $30,000,000? The 
answer is simple, yet dishearten- 
ing. 

1950 was the third consecutive 
year this nation experienced a de- 
vastating polio epidemic. 1950 
was not the most severe year for 
epidemic, and il did not create the 
startling headlines except in areas 
where the disease was highly con- 
centrated. But, with the pall of 
1048's and 1949's tragic events still 
hanging over oui beads, before the 
year was out polio had claimed an 
estimated 30,000 new victims of 
infantile paralysis for 1950. Thus 
following in the wake of the two 
previous years' widespread epide- 
mics, the 30,000 cases of i960 have 
all but broken the back of hundreds 
of Foundation Chapters. 

If there were no March of Dimes, 
the toll of polio victims for 1051, 
1952, 1953, and on and on would 
mount to heights beyond compre- 
hension. If there were no March 
of Dimes, the care of the thousands 
of polio victims would disastrously 
come to an end. 

Join in the tight against polio by 
supporting the greatest lighter of 
all-the March of Dimes, Your con- 
tributions may be made through 
any one or all of the following 
means: 

March of Dimes Cards 
Special Personal Gifts 
Coin Collectors 

and through "Operation Porchlight, 

The Mothers' March" 

T to 8 p. m. Wednesday, Jan. 31 

C. A. P. NEW S 
MEDFORD FLIGHT 




LIBRARY ACTIVITIES 



Interested In Statistics? 



(■llcl. SCOUT NEWS 



Everyone attending the annual 
meeting last week felt a measure of 
reassurance as Mr. Blackham ex- 
plained our part in the Civilian 
Defense plan. At the business ses- 
sion the following slate of officers 
was unanimously adopted: 

< *'iriirniwsiorit.'r - Mrs. James It. Wiliinfr. 

It: Lcdyarit road 
Deputy C'uninii.-M'rtH-r - Mr- Maxwell Mc- 

Creary. I Curtis street 
Secretary - Mr.-.. Lawrence P. Donlun. 70 

Hernliltfwav street 
Treasurer - Mrs. Walter F. Roberts, 1-t 

Range e> 

Registrar - Mi-.- Constance Lane. 37 Glen 
Green 

Finance Coiwtftittee - Mrs. A. Robert Ten- 
on. 5:i LaWHon road extension 

Ways and Means - Mr- Barton A. Miller. 
25 Ritlgefield mad 

Camji Committee - Mrs. Res well W. Hard- 
ing, 'J4 Hancock street 

Trim p Camping - Mi-. William L. Glowacki, 
Is N. Gateway 

Trie Camping - Mr-. Francis Parsons, 2 
Euclid avenue 

Camp Advisory - Mis. George W. Gary. 30 

WlldWOOd stieet 

Organization - Mrs. George W. Cary. 30 

VVildWDod "tre.t 

Public lie atums - Mrs. Robert Lmvry. l"it< 

Carnbiidye street 
Program Committee - Mrs, Edmund N. 

Wright, V'.i Wild wood street 

Senior Prograni - Mr-. Waldon B. Her- 
S«y, 2'' Woo side road 

Service - Mrs, Richard A. Smith, *» 

Church street 

Juliette Lew - Mrs. Lawrence Dallin, 
42 Salishury road 
Staff and Office - Mrs. ('. Edward Newell, 

1!" Kdgehill road 
Training Commitee - Mrs. H. Robert Finn, 

2»i Prince avenue. Wl t',-077S 
Advisory - Mrs. Harold V, Farnsworth, 2 

Central Green 
Member at large - Mrs. Clarence A. Ttol,- 

erts, 20 Westlatld avenue 

Niiminnting-Mcmbcrship CommittM- 1951-52 

Term expires IS52 - Mi-. William A. 
Swett, .", Wolrott terrace 

Term expires 1952 - Mrs. f rank J. Mc- 
Nally. 11 Kock avenue 

Term expires 1958 - Mrs. Hollis Dyer. 5!l 
Pond *tl t 

Term expires 1953 - Mrs. Benjamin Mar- 
shall. Jr., o llrookside avenue 

Term expires IB53 - Mrs. Kenneth Cullen. 
2 I Stevens street 

Respectfully submitted, 
Nominating- Membership 

< 'ommittee 
Mis. Clarence A. Roberts, 
Chairman 
Mrs. Edward T. Peabody 
Mrs. Joseph S. Donnell 
Mrs. William A. Swett 
Mrs. Kenneth Cullen 



Number of books loaned for home- 
use in 1950 139,757 

Number of music recordings loaned 
for home use in 1950 .... 5,302 

Number of books added to library's 
collection in 1950 3,307 

Total number of volumes in library 

52,115 

Total number of newspapers and 
periodicals currently received 

183 

Number of library borrowers regis- 
teied during the year .... 3,2X4 

Total number of registered bor- 
rowers 8,084 

Number of cards tiled in card 
catalog in 1950 8,179 



+ 



Interested In Old Automobiles? 

Three new books which may be 
of interest to you ate, "The Story 
of a Stanley Steamer", entertain- 
ing life history of the car told by 
George Woodbury, author of John 
(iotfe's Mill; "Treasury of Early 
Automobiles" by Clymer, a pic- 
torial history of automobiles from 
1877 to 1925; and "Get a Horse" in 
which M. M. Musselman tells of the 
transition from the 'horse and 
buggy' days to the automobile of 
to-day. For other books of this 
type see the special exhibit in the 
library's foyer, "Signs of Progress" 
progress not only in transporta- 
tion, but also in medicine, science, 
etc. 



Recorded music program for 
Wednesday, January 24 at 3 p. in. 
and again at 7:30 p. in. in the 
Downs Room: 

Symphony No. 0 (Third, Fourth 
and Fifth Movements! — Beetho- 
ven. 

Scene d'Amour from Romeo and 
Juliet Symphony — Berlioz. 

Selections from Porgy and Bess 
-— Gershwin. 

Concerto for Piano and Orches- 
tra in A minor (First movement) 
-Schumann. 

Music from "Petrouchka Ballet" 
— Stravinsky. 



WINCHESTER RED CROSS 

A new class in first aid began 
Wednesday evening in the Red 
Cross class room at the Town Hall. 
This new class was required be- 
cause the Monday evening class 
was tilled. Both classes run for 
two hours an evening beginning at 
7:30. The course will continue for 
nine weeks. 

Entertainers from the Armed 
Forces Club in Boston were 
brought to the Bedford Veterans' 
Hospital by the Winchester Red 
Cross Motor Corps on Wednesday. 
The Motor Corps station wagon 
also made three trips to Massachu- 
setts General Hospital and one to 
Chelsea Soldiers Home this week. 
Five pints of blood were brought 
to Winchester Hospital last week. 

The local Red Cross is sending 
three Winchester women to a 
nurse's training course in Salem. 

Miss Meredith Wagner of this 
town has been re-assigned by the 
American National Red Cross to a 
military hospital in Germany as a 
recreation worker. She served 
previously in Korea. 



TRICK AND CAR CRASHED 
FRIDAY 



Two occupants of a Pontiac 
sedan were taken to the hospital 
last Friday and the car in which 
they were tiding was badly dam- 
aged in a collision with a big trail- 
er truck on Main street in the 
vicinity of the Mystic School. 

According to the Police the 
accident took place about 10 o'clock 
in the morning and the trailer 
truck involved was a Mack tractor 
truck with a 32 ft. Freuhef trailer, 



owned by Robert Express Inc., of 
Manchester, N. H.. and being 
driven south on Main street by 
Armand J. Beauchesne of 255 Pearl 
street, Manchester, X. H. 

Beauchesne told the Police he 
was passing a garbage truck park- 
ed in front of the residence of 
Richard A. Brogna, 254 Main 
street. As he did so he heard a 
crash and upon stopping his truck 
found the trailer had collided with 
a Pontiac sedan, owned and driven 
by Harold Francis Fennell of 32 
Cunard street, Roxbury. Riding 



with him was Arnold Kirksey of,' 
the same address. 

Both men were removed to the 
Winchester Hospital in the Police 
Ambulance by officers John Hogan 
and John Murray. They were treat- 
ed by Dr. Harry I.. Benson. Fen- 
nell for lacerations of the lip, face 
and head, as well as injuries to his 
knees and legs. Kirksey sustained 
knee and leg injuries. 

Police say Kirksey told them the 
trailer skidded into the Pontiac, 
Beauchesne could not account for 
the accident. 



NOTICE OF CERTAIN 
UNCLAIMED PROPERTY HEED 
in WINCHESTER TRl'ST 
COMPANY 

Pursuant to G. E. Chapter 200A 
notice is given that the following 
described property of the follow- 
ing named presumed owners, whose 
last known residence was in the 
city or town indicated, will be 
turned over to the Commissioner 
of Corporations and Taxation on or 
'before February 15. 1951 and that 
thereupon the holder thereof shall 
cease to be liable therefor. 

Savintrs Department 
Miss Dorothy M. Bagley, Pena- 

cook, N. II . 
Charles R. Eliot, Boston, Mass. 



Education film program for next 
week Friday, January 20 at 7:30 
p. m. (Family Night) and Saturday 
morning, January 27 at 10:15 
a. m.: 

1950 News 

The Bundy's Breeze Through 
Making Bricks for Houses 
New England Fishermen 



Johnson, 
and Ellen H 



Winchester, 



Read, Win- 
Winchester, 



Some people wonder what type 
of planes the Civil Air Patrol uses. 
The most common plane used by 
the C. A. P. is the I. - 4 which i's 
the Piper Cub, a two seat airplane. 
The C. A. P. has a few E - 5's 
which are two-seat Stinsons. These 
planes belong to the United States 
Air Force and are on loan to the 
Civil Air Patrol. In emergencies 
the C. A. P. also uses private planes 
which have been made available for 
such use. The C. A. P. has insur- 
ance to pay for any damage done 
to any of the private planes used. 

The Medford Flight C. A. P. 
meets at the Lincoln Junior High 
School in South Medford where it 
holds classes in pre-flight training. 
Starting this week the Medford 
Flight will bold along with the pre- 
flight classes a course in fundamen- 
tal photography. The purpose of 
this course is to teach the mem- 
bers how to take better pictures. 
Many of the members have taken 
many pictures of the C. A. P. in ac- 
tion but many of the pictures 
weren't good enough to be printed. 

The C. A P. will welcome all 
boys and girl* who are interested 
in aviation, those who are between 
the ages of 15 and is as Cadets and 
those 18 or over as Seniors. All 
persons interested in C. A. P. 
should get in touch with Second 
Lieutenant Henry A. Dellieker, Jr., 
oi Public Information Officer A Ivan 
< ;. Smith, Jr. 



The Ski School was well attended 
last Saturday. There are now 23 
registered in Mr. Pollard's group, 
which means a few more can still 
join. Contact the office before Sat- 
urday, if you are interested. 

The plans for the Senior Scout 
trip to Washington, D. C. in April 
are about completed. There will be 
room for two or three more but the 
applications must be made at once 
at the Scout Office. 

The Brownie Leaders' Work Shop 
will be held at the office on Tues- 
day, January 23 at 10 a. m. 

Leaders, please note . . . From 
each Senior Scout troop you are to 
send two representatives to the 
! Senior Planning Board meeting 
Tuesday. January 23, after School. 



Library Hours 

Adult Department 10 a. m. to 9 
p. m. Saturdays 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Boys 'and Girls' Library 10 a. m. 
to 12 noon. 1 to 6 p. m. 

Tel. Winchester 0-1106 



OPENS HEATING FUND 
CAMPAIGN 



BAPTIST ^ Ol TH FELLOWSHIP 



On Sunday evening. January 
21st. at 6:30 o'clock, the Baptist 
Youth Fellowship will have as its 
speaker, Mr. Allen Tinkham, a 
senior student at Tufts College. 
Mr. Tinkham has spent some time 
working as a fire watcher and 
fighter for the United States Gov- 
ernment in the Northern section of 
the Rocky Mountains. He will speak 
on the subject "Forest Fire." All 
young people will want to hear the 
exciting story he has to tell. The 
worship service will be conducted 
by James Ekstrom and Philip 
Dresser. Refreshments will be in 
charge of Emily Allen and Madel- 
oii Nelson. 

Friday evening. January 26th, at 
7 o'clock is the date for the month- 
ly "Fun-Nite" for the Junior High 
and Senior High group. Coach 
Meurling will be on hand as usual 
to direct the games and fun. This 
date is one that no young person 
will want to miss. 

Sunday. Januarv 28th. is Youth 
Sunday John Hunt Chappie, Di- 
rector of Youth Activities, will 
speak at the Morning Sanctuary 
service. His subject will be "The 
Children of Light and the Children 
of Darkness." The young people 
will take active part in the ser- 
vice. 



J. H. ASSOCIATES TO DISCUSS 
"ADOLESCENCE" 

A panel discussion: "Adoles- 
cence: Which Way to Maturity?", 
sponsored by the Junior High 
School Associates will be presented 
Monday, February 5th, promptly at 
8 p. m. in the High School Audito- 
rium. 

Parents and others may not 
agree with Webster in his definition 
of the word "adolescence" but a 
challenge to parents will be given 
by the panel members. 

The moderator of the Round 
Table for the evening will be Ml. 
Roland Greeley. Professor at 
M. 1. T. He is not only the father 
of a tine family but is a member of 
a distinguished family well-known 
in Boston for many years. He is 
noted for his quick ability to handle 
effervescent subjects as well as his 
timely and helpful comments. 

Among the panel members are 
Dr. Leo Alexander, noted Boston 
neurologist and psychiatrist: Mr. 
Howard J. Parard, District Secre- 
tary of the Fellsway District, 
Family Society of Greater Boston; 
Dr. Herbert J. Lamson, Professor 
of Sociology, Boston University; 
Mr. Allen F. Smith, former chair- 
man of Exploring, member of 
Executive Board. Fellsland Coun- 
cil Boy Scouts of America. 

This meeting is free and public 
to all parents, particularly those 
whose children are in grades 6 to 
12. 



A parish-wide Heating Fund 
Campaign to raise $25,000 will be 
launched following the Annual 
Meeting of the Parish of the Epi- 
phany next Wednesday evening. 
January 24th at 7:45 p. m. in the 
palish hall. This appeal is being 
made in order to improve the 
present woefully inadequate heat- 
ing system and to replace the 
nearly fifty-year old boilers, which 
were installed in 1904. 

Volunteer solicitors will make 
calls for pledges from January 25 
to February 24th, and subscriptions 
will be accepted for payment over 
the twelve month period ending 
January 23, 1952. There will be no 
solicitation of subscriptions at the 
Annual Meeting, and it is hoped 
that all parishioners will attend to 
bear details and further explana- 
tion of the campaign. 

The Heating Committee, which 
has done the preliminary study and 
organization, is headed by Dwight 
W. Hadley, Honorary Chairman, 
Francis E. Booth, ( hairman, and 
Harlow Russell, Campaign Chair- 
man. Other members are Malcolm 
D. Bennett, Harry L. Benson. 
Samuel M. Best, William II. Burac- 
ker. Dunbar F. Carpenter. Albert 
S. Crockett, Bradford U. Eddy. 
William A. Everett. Henry K. Fitts, 
Robert J. Fletcher, Waldo L. Hart, 
Donald Heath. Gerald Y. Hills, 
William E. Holdich. Robert H. 
Jewell, Herbert W. Kelley, Frank 
D. Madge, Harvard L, Mann, Max- 
well McCreery, Henry E. MofTette, 
John W. Page, Louis E. Page, 
Clarence A. Perkins. Howard P. 
Richardson, Harold B. Richmond, 
and Arthur W. Y'ardlev. 



Winifret 
Mass. 
Mabel L. 

chester, Mass. 
Ella Whittington 
Mass. 

Commercial Department 

C. J. Allen, Winchester, Mass. 
Albert J. Brown, Winchester, 
Mass. 

Eva J. Burton, Winchester, Mass. 
Kate J. B. Howard, New York 
City 

J. J. and Paul Moonan, Winches- 
ter, Mass. 

Ellen A. Morse, Winchester, 
Mass. 

Howard Bobbins, Winchester, 
Mass. 

Zeta District Conclave,, Benj. 
R. Priest, Treas., Cambridge, 
Mass. 

In addition to the above listed 
accounts, this bank is holding 122 
accounts of less than $10.00 each, 
totaling $141.33 to be turned over 
to the Commissioner. A list of these 
accounts is available at each office 
of the Bank. 

DR. BARREXX GRANTED SIX 
PATENTS 



Di. Gerald R. Barrett of 34 Allen 
road, research group leader at 
Monsanto Chemical CompanyV 
Merritnac Division in Everett, has 
recently had six United States 
patents granted in his name. 

The inventions covered by these 
patents and worked out for Mon- 
santo by Dr. Barrett relate to ma- 
terials which have been used by 
industry for textiles, paper and 
surface coatings. 

A native of Massachusetts, and 
a long-time resident of Winchester, 
Dr. Barrett is a graduate of Har- 
vard College, studied at College de 
France in Paris, and received bis 
Ph. D. from Harvard in 1923. He 
joined Monsanto's Merrimac Divi- 
sion research department in July, 
1923, and since that time has had 
a total of eleven patents granted in 
his name. He is a member of the 
American Chemical Society. 



WINTON CLUB 



As last year. Thursday, Theater 
Night, anuary 25, will be a finished 
production, although there will be 
no dancing privilege. Tickets are 
on sale at Filene's from January 
18 through January 25, from 10-4, 
or contact Mrs. Herbert T. Wads- 
worth, Winchester 6-0005. 



SENIOR FORUM CHAPEL 
SERYICE 



AMERICAN LEGION 
AUXILIARY 



We are sorry to have to announce 
that the very interesting "Box So- 
cial" and entertaining scheduled 
for Saturday. January 27. will be 
postponed until a later date. Many 
other purUc« jjyg being held on 
that same date and it seems advis- 
able to wait until next month, so 
Watch for the new date in this 
column as plans are progressing 
with added vigor. 

There will be a Bridge and Whist 
Party at the Legion Home on Mon- 
day evening. January 29. under the 
chairmanship of Lola Bennett and 
Sally Meek Give them your sup- 
port and bring your friends and all 
the members who may miss the an- 
nouncement. 

Another Valentine Dance will be 
held on February 10. with Dot Car- 



On Sunday, January 21, at 9:30 
a. m., in Ripley Chapel the Senior 
Forum of the First Congregation- 
al Church will hold a panel discus- 
sion concerning the movies, "South 
of the Clouds," and "Again 
Pioneers," which have been shown 
at previous chapel services. The 
former concerned educational work 
of Congregational Christian 
churches in the Near East, speci- 
fically showing scenes at the Col- 
lege for Women at Beirut. "Again 
Pioneers." which was shown last 
Sunday, was a deeply moving story 
of a migrant family who came to 
Fairview. "a friendly town." but 
found they were not wanted in 
Fairview's schools or churches be- 
cause they lived in "The Patch." 

Gordon Bird. Jr., Louise Kugler. 
Dorothy Parker, Richard Rush, and 
Berta Jane Tonon will present short 
talks on different phases of the 
church's mission to the Near East 
and to migrant peoples in our own 
country, with emphasis on "What 
Can We Do about It?" 



PARTNER IN ACCOUNTING 
FIRM 

Hard upon the announcement of | 
his election to the American Insti- 
tute of Accounting, national pro- 
fessional society of the CPA's, 
comes the news that Lewis M. Fos- 
ter. CPA. of 34 Lloyd street has 
become a partner in Spark. Mann 
and Company, accountants and 
auditors at 00 State street, Boston. 
He has been associated with this 



OVER 1,000 DIFFERENT TOYS 



WE 
CARRY 

QUALITY 
TOYS 



( onlson tricycles — Lionel Train Sets and Accessories 
— Playskool educational toys — American character. Ideal. Hors- 
man. Vogue, and Nancy Ann Dolls — Thayer and South Bend 
Strollers and Carriages — Gilbert Trains and Toys — Columbia 
bicycles — Gund Stuffed Animals — Murray Ohio Pedal Autos 
and Tricycles — Smith-Miller Trucks and Model Toys plus many- 
others. 

If Your Service — the Year Round for Birthdays, Surprises 
and Just for Fun! 

GENBILL TOY STORE 

282 WASHINGTON STREET, WINCHESTER 

(near Winchester Arms Apartments i 
Member National Toy Guidance Council 
Pay us a visit and obtain a copy of our Toy Year Book 




TORES 



BE SIRE TO VISIT Oil 





Celebrating Our 10th Anniversary 



AT 



605 Main Street 

WINCHESTER - MASS. 

THURSDAY - FRIDAY - SATURDAY 

Jan. 18th Jan. 19th Jan. 20th 



ENJOY A FREE SLICE OF OUR 

GIANT BIRTHDAY 



SEE THE h\AKY 

FREE FOOD 
DEMONSTRATIONS 



See Attractive Displays - Enjoy Tasting Samples 

Borden Cream Cheese Eg 16 c 
Borden Cheese Spreads 5 S 26 c 
Hellmann's Mayonnaise Tr 51 c 
Hellmann's Relish Spread 1a? 28 c 

Hellmann's French Dressing *£} 24' 
Hellmann' S Horseradish Mustard 6 jar 9* 

Bread -Butter Pickles 25 1 
Brown'n Serve Rolls of. 16' 
Minestrone Soup 



BUDRELL'S 15-OZ Ol 1 
DELICIOUS CAN XI 



America's Favorite Spread 

NUCOA 

lb %ac 

PKC JO 

FREE! 

On* Can of Chicken Broth 
and Rice With Purchase of 

INGERSOLLS 

BONED CHICKEN 

FRICASSEE 

BOTH JA( 

for ■»y 

Two Cans of Broth FREE 
With Purchase of 

INGERSOLLS 
HALF-CHICKEN 

30TH 



FOR 

Featured on Ken and 
Carolyn Radio Show 

H-0 OATS 

16-OZ "fTFC 
PKC I / 



Special Birthday Values! 

BROOKS IDE i JOAN CAROL— FRESH 



ICE CREAM 

19* 



All lUeular PINT 
Flavor! PKC 



DOUGHNUTS 

19" 



Plain, Sugared 
ar Cinnamon DOZ 



HANDCRAFT 



APPLE 

^ 39* 



EACH 



The Specials Above on Sale Only at First National Store, 605 Main Street, Winchester 



FIRST 



NATIONAL 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1951 



7 



FKIKNDS OF THE 
Wi.NCHFSTEK HOSIM! AL 

The Thursday evening < February 
1) performance of the Parish flay- 
ers' winter production, VThundei 
Rock" - - to be given in Parish 



lall, First (,'ongregat 
- is being spongt 



Friends of 
pital. Proct 
ance will 1 
enable this 
ganization 

On Wednesday 
week, Mrs. John 
home on Bruce i 



mal Church 
ed by the 
the Winchester Hos- 
eds ft • <m that perform- 
enefit the Friends and 
volunteer service or- 
:<• cany on it> projects, 
afternoon of ia«t 
Page opened her 
>ad to a meeting 



of Ways and Means, at which Mrs. 
Howard J. ('hidlt-y of the Parish 
Players was a guc-t of honor. 
Plans were drawn for the sale of 
tickets and committees. 

Mrs. Bruce W. Young, and Mrs 
Donald L. Birehall, are co-chairmen 
of the Friends tirk'-t committee 
for "Thunder Rock", assisted by 
Mrs. James Toon Jr., Mrs. Royce 
Randlett, Mrs. Nelson Fonteneau, 
Mrs. Kdward Stone, Mrs. Sanford 
Moses, Mrs. Courtney Crandall, 



Wadsworth and Mrs. Kail Carrier, 
flowers; Mrs. Ben Schneider, and 
Mrs. Bruce Young, coffee shop; 
Mrs, George K. Connor, publicity; 
Mrs. Fulton Brown, President of 
the- Friends. Mrs. John Cummins, 
chairman of sewing, was unable to 
be present since a sewing group 
was in session. 

Mrs. Rtinci reported on excellent 
assistance at the Blood Bank, with 
Workers coming at their conveni- 
ence during tlie day. Records are 
now being brought up to date — 
cards on blond donors, with ad- 
dresses and collect phone numbers. 
Miss (iaffney of Medford ha- tome 
faithfully Mondays, Thursdays and 
Sunday.: t" type records and work 
with donors, These records, when 
ready will be of inestimable value 
to the Bank and the Hospital. Wom- 
en who are accurate are still 
needed for this work. 

Mrs. 
clerical 
mittee 

Thursdays, has 11 active members 
on call, typing discharge letters 



meeting sent i n her report of 
favor.- made ttix New Year's, as 
well as for Christmas, for the hos- 
pital trays. Her group meets twice 
a month, making about ho favor3. 

Mrs. Young, gift and coffee shop 
chairman, told of her enthusiastic 
committee members who enjoy 
working In the coffee and gift shop 
on Mondays and Thursdays, 

Mrs, Kdward Harmon, Supplies, 
reported a good number of wom- 
en interested in sponges and 

needles ill the supply loom, with 

another group ready to receive in- 
struction and begin work. There 
are enough women now to work i 
(two days! through April, but after 
then, more volunteers will be 
needed. 

Mrs. Cummins' workers on mend- j 
ing and making sponges are meet- 
ing now in neighborhood groups, j 
These women sew and mend all 



I ELEPHONE PION EERS 
ORG \X!ZE I.OCALl.i 



S( HOOL CHILDREN OF 
TO R VISE FENDS 



P. S. 



HOSPITAL FRIENDS 
RECEIVE NEWS LETTER 



PARISH PL V VERS TO Do 
"THl'NDER KO< K" 



Council 



Wickerson, chairman of day, bringing their box lunches 
assistance, with her com- while the hostess furnishes coffee 
working Mondays a n d This week groups met with Mrs. 

Allan Wilde, Mrs. James McGovern, 
Mrs, Wickerson, Mrs. Sanford 



, and records. A good typewriter Moses, and Mrs. Cummins. Mrs. 
Wrs. Clement Williams, Mrs. Carl and typew riter chair are needed by Thomas Kirwan's group will be- 
Smith, Mrs. Baisley, Mrs. Ernest this group. gin work this week on making 

B. Richmond, Jr. and Mrs. Percy The flower committee under Mrs. sponges, and in Reading, two 
Sweetser of Reading. Wadsworth and Mrs. Carrier, is groups have been at work under 

enthusiastically carrying on its Sirs. Justin Anderson and Mrs. E. 

Mrs. Everett P. Stone of 10 work at the hospital," and there is j Woodward. Would you be willing 
arren street was hostess last i still need for women on the substi- I to start a neighborhood group? 
week Thursday to chairmen o f tute list. These women change 
the Volunteer Services. With Mrs. flowers for the patients' rooms, and 
Mrs. Stone for the lobby, making flowers Oil- 
Volunteer ways an expensive item) last longer 
and bring more pleasure to the 
patients. 

Mrs. Burleigh, chairman of 
favors, unable to be present at the 



W 



Howard A. Morrison, 
is co-chairman of tl 
Services for the Hospital. Present 
at the meeting were Mrs. Dominic 
Runci, blood bank; Mrs. Clarence 
Rickerson, clerical; Mrs. Philip 




JODi "MARCH Or DIMES 



Moody Motor Sales 

Inc. 

632 Main St. Winchester, Mass. 

TEL. Winchester 6-3133 



c¥ot MARCH or DIMES 



JANUARY 15-31 



Mrs. Fulton Brown announced 
the general meeting of the Friends, 
open to everyone, on February 15 
at 3 o'clock in the Music Hall. A 
most distinguished speaker will be 
present that day. Mrs. Abraham 
Pinanski, 'dean of hospital aux- 
iliaries'" a charming lady as 
well as an interesting one. All 
women are urged to save that 
date, and attend the meeting! 



SHARON AT FORT DI\ 

Fireman Robert K. Sharon of 29 
Maxwell road, one of Winchester's 
recent inductees, has completed the 
. process of conversion from civilian 
' to military status, and is now at 
, Fort Dix, X. J., where he has been 
, assigned to Co. F. »',0th Infantry 
Regiment of the Ninth Infantry 
I Hvision. 

He will now undergo six weeks of 
physical conditioning, instruction in 
general military subjects, and 
training in small arms and combat 
skills. He will then begin an eight 
weeks' course, either in the infantry 
at Bix or in technical service at 
another army post. 

Fireman Sharon is the son of 
Mrs. Alfred N. Henley of Max- 
well road. 



The North Metropolitar 
which include- telephone pioneers 
residing in the cities of Cambridge, 
j Somerville and Woburn, and the 
towns of Arlington, Belmont, Win- 
chester, Stoneham, Wakefield and 
Heading, will hold its charter meet- 
ing and first election of officers 
at the Hotel Commander, Harvard 
Square, Cambridge, Masxs. on the 
nineteenth day of January, 1951 
at 8 o'clock in the evening. 

The committee under the chair- 
manship of Mr. Fran!-. J. Collin-. 
Plant Superintendent, Cambridge, 
has planned a full evening for all. 
Entertainment and a Buffet Lunch- 
eon served after the business meet- 
ing will highlight the evening. 
Tickets are $1,50 per person. 

Pioneers and their guests are 
urged to attend this most impor- 
tant charter meeting. 

The Telephone Pioneers of 
America, an association of longer 
service employees, active and re- 
tired, in the telephone industry, 
has for many years functioned as 
an oi ganization through a num- 
ber of autonomous chapters located 
in all major cities of the United 
States. 

The Thomas Sherwin Chapter, 
No, 14 formed in Boston under a 
charter dated August 1922, has 
served pioneers in the Metropoli- 
tan area, Northeastern Mass . and 
th«' state of New Hampshire. 

Because such an organization is 
destined to grow, and with this 
growth responsibilities and obliga- 
tions tri its members tire greatly 
multiplied; the Sherwin Chapter, 
I through its officers, has authorized 
[the formation of councils within 
the chapter structure. The sole 
purpose of councilization therefore 
| is to bring smaller groups togeth- 
er on a inori' intimate basis and 
| keep closer sights on the general 
purpose of the organization — 
; which purposes are "to promote 
I among them (pioneers) a continu- 
ing fellowship and a -pit it of 
mutual helpfulness." 



Miss Marie Dever, First Lady of 
the Commonwealth, is Chairman of 
a committee formed to raise funds 
bo a great centra! fountain at the 
new United Nations headquarters 
in New York Every student in the 
schools of tlie State is to be asked to 
contribute a penny or more for the 
Massachusetts quota. 

Nationally, the committee, known 
as the Governor-' Wive.- Commit- 
tee foi Central Fountain at United 
Nations Headquarters, is bended 



Tlie 

-bed 



first 
by the T 
estel Hospit; 
embers, inter 
taries of \v< 



it 

civic 
mailt 
Mrs. 
tarv. 
The 



News Lett el | 
riends of the \ 
.1 and sent to 
■stod persons, 
nun's 



in- 
all 

■ 



'Thundet Rock 



nu 



anu 



g! oiips, 

•d this we 
Fulton Brown 
Mrs. Joseph 
letter set 



church and 
schools, has been 
by the President, 



wii 



Mr. .and Mrs. L. H. Pexton of 8 
Penn road are among the Winches- 
ter residents who are members of 
the Associated Alumni of Univer- 
sity of Colorado at Boulder and 
Denver, Colo., observing the Uni- 
versity's 75th anniversary year on 
January 26-27. Alumni' from all 
over the country will participate 
in the event. 




Director 
Edna M 
STonel 



THE ORLAND HOUSE 

342 Forest Street. Maiden 

Yr/i.s7V(; HOME 



Brawn 
ini 6-1762 



Managers 
Orland & Fanny Colborne 
MAlden 4-209(1 

jnnlti-Ut 




SEE IT T tl It A Y : 




^f^M ^^b^-^^Lmm mm mt^m ^*m i^#mmt 

l>oit i iac* 




Bfiew and l»<*autf if nl Proof 

//at Dollar for Dollar you cant beat a Poittiac t 



The Car Proves it by its 

Beauty and Performance! 

The Price Proves it by its 
Downright Value! 



Be prepared to see tuv striking things when you come in to 
examine the wonderful new Silver Anniversary Pontiac. 

First, you will see why Pontiac is acknowledged to be the most 
beautiful thing on wheels. You will see a brilliantly good-looking 
car, with its fresh. Cull- Wing styling, colorful new interiors 
and clean, exciting lines. 

Second, you will see a price tag on these magnificent new 
Pontiaos which is so low that you will find it hard to understand 
why anybody ever buys any new car but a Pontiac! 

Here, indeed, is double-barreled proof that dollar for dollar you 
can't beat a Pontiac! Come in and see for yourself. 



MOODY MOTOR SALES, INC. 



by Mis. Arthur B. Langlie, 
of the ( Jovernoi of Washington. 
The territories, Alaska, Hawaii, 
Puerto Kiio and the Virgin Islands 
are also participating. Thus, every 
school child and future citizen of 
the United States may -how Ins 
faith in future of the United Na- 
tions. 

The fountain will be in the form 
of a huge circular basin in front 
of the headquarters building. The 
aqua glass facade of the building 
will reflect the moving waters of 
the fountain and greet visitors as 
they approach. The cost of tlie 
fountain will- be *7. r >.(>(»() and each 
state and territory has been as- 
signed a quota, none over $2,000. 

Miss I lever's letter to all school 
administrators in the State is as 
follows: 

"To School Administrators of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 
The children of the United States, 
through the schools, tire being 
asked to contribute a penny or more 
each to build a fountain at the 
new United Nations headquarters 
in New York. A national commit- 
tee to head the campaign has been 
formed by the First Ladies of all 
the states. Many states have al- 
ready filled or overflowed their 
quotas. Here in Massachusetts, 
I am sure that I can count on a 
quick and enthusiastic response to 
this appeal. A "fountain of pen- 
nies" from the schools of the Com- j 
monwealth will help to build a per- 
manent symbol of faith i n the 
United Nations and hope for the 
future of the younger generation. 

I hope that we may have your ac- 
tive support." 

Sincerely yours, 
Marie Dover 



and the secre- 
T. McCauley. 
forth in concise 
which the Friends 
ts plans, its appre- 
orkers. and its in- 
e Winchester citi- 
menibership ranks. 

nt time, with no 
membership drives, no active cam- 
paign for due.-, the Friends - - not 
yet a year old - - has 261 paid mem- 
bers. Of these, 120 are working in 
volunteer services for the 



terms the worl 
is carrying on, 
e : atiun to its i 
citation to mi 
zetis to join its 

At the pre- 



th 



women i 

•VI 

tlie wint 
ish Plav 

.1!..! 

;. . 

Bene, 
t iona 
Cran 



no were 
!»<) yea I 
i prodm 
i s on I 
Saturday h, 
and 8, in th 
it:, a Spi' i , 

. is directing 
B. Lunsfoid, 
in in this se 
Players' ; 



> 1 ec kc 



lusuai 
■r who 
n and 
n this 
> before, will be 
t.ion of the Par- 
huisday, Fridav 
nings. February 
e Li. tie Theati'e 
Fii.-t Congivga- 
Mr. Harlan F. 
.with Mis. Wib 
rhaii man of pro- 
.ond play in tin 
wiiity-fifth sea 



duct LOl 

Parish 
son. 

The play, written by Robert A: 
drey, fust staged by EHa Kazan 
at the Mansfield Theatre in New 
York, take< place in tlie circular. 



-tone-walled lightl 



■ use on 



Hospital - in the Blood Bank, 
Clerical Department, on supplies, 
arranging flowers daily, making 
favors for patients' trays, making 
sponges, staffing the Cift and 
Coffee shops, and doing the mend- 
ing so vitally needed by the Hospi- 
tal. This does not include women 
in groups already established in 
this town and in Heading and 
Wakefield. The Gray Ladies, under 
lied Cross, are doing an excellent 
job in the lobby during visiting 
hours, and the Girl Scouts serve as 
couriers. At Christmas, the Win- 
chester Garden Club and the Win- 
chester Home and Garden Club 
supplied lovely decorations for the 
hospital and nurses' home. 

"There are many willing work- 
ers among you." Mrs. Brown's let- 
ter states with appreciation. "And 
there tire places for all as new ser- 
vices are arranged by the hospital". 
Membership in the Friends is wel- 
come, though it is not obligatory 
if one wishes to volunteer in the 
many services to assist the Hospi- 
tal. The treasurer is Mrs. Henry V. 
Bonzagni, HI Pleasant street. 
Wakefield. 



WITH EASTERN AIRLINES 



Richard B. Carter, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Roland R. Carter, 247 
Washington street, has joined 
Eastern Air Lines as flight attend- 
ant after completing the airline's 
one-month course in Miami, Flori- 
da. 

He attended grade school here 
and graduated from the Arling- 
ton High School (Arlington, Mass.i 
and studied at Nichols Junior Col- 
lege at Dudley I Mass. i 

Prior to joining Eastern, he 
spent 10 months in the Navy and 
was a bank clerk at the First Na- 
tional Bank of Boston. 

As an F.AI. flight attendant, he 
will be based at LaGuardia Field. 
New York. 



The News Letter tells of the 
monthly talks at the Nurses' Home, 
the "Know Your Hospital Series", 
open to all, and of the money-rais- 
ing projects of the Friends - - - a 
share in Staff and Key's production 
of "lolanthe", and during Novem- 
ber, "Hospital Friends' Night" at 
Parish Players. Bridge Parties 
are being held dttrinir the interim, 
proceeds going to the Friends' 
fund. 

The next meeting of the Friends 
of the Winchester Hospital takes 
place on February 15, at 3 o'clock, 
in the Music Hall with Mrs. Abra- 
ham Pinanski as the key speaker. 
The meeting is open to everyone. 



Charles W. Craven of 8 Wyman 
court and Thomas L. Morrison of 
I Highland terrace are Winchester 
men active in the Boston Chapter 
of the National Association of Cost 
Accountants, the members of which 
heard a discussion at their meeting 
Wednesday in Boston of problems 
involved in connection with the 



Rock, a -peck of an island in Lake 
Michigan. The lighthouse keeper. 
Charleston, (played by Grant Burt- 
nett) is an idealist who rejects the 
world because he feels he "cannot 
help the world in its plight." Ami 
so he peoples tlie lonely light- 
house on Thunder Rock with the 
passengers from a sailing vessel 
which had been wrecked on that 
spot in 1849, with all hands lost. 
He brings these characters to life 
— and they d\, ,!' ;, i his lighthouse 
with him. A; first they are pup 
pets of his own mind. Gradually 
they rebel, and show the charac- 
teristics that were theirs during 
their lifetime and Mr. Charles- 
ton is in for a .jolt. The clevei 
plot makes an exciting ami unusual 
[evening, and its theme is a time- 
ly one. 

The creation of a lighthouse set 
will he a challenge for the capable 
stage crew, under Raymond Car- 
ter, ami lighting effects will be 
done by Kendall H. Spencer. 

The cast, in order of their ap 
pea ranee, is as follows: Harlan 
Smith, Marshall W. Pihl. Jr., ,1 . 
Waldo Bond, Grant Burtnett, 
George K. Connor, F. Milne 
Blanchard, Walter Hodge-. Nancy 
Nutter, Mrs. R. l|. Sibley, Mr-. 
Hall Gamage, Herbert Clark. 

The board of the Parish Players, 
through its chairman, George 
Gowdy, announces that the pel 
formance of "Thunder Rock" on 
Thursday evening, February 1, 
will be turned over to the Friends 
of the Winchester Hospital, to as- 
sist their fund-raising project. Mrs. 
Bruce W. Young is chairman of 
tickets for that evening, assisted 
by Mrs. Donald I.. Birehall and a 
large committee. Proceeds from 
tickets sold by the committee for 
that evening will directly benefit 
the Friends' work. 

Mrs. Fulton Brown, Mrs. How 
aid A. Morrison, Mis. John Cai- 
ruthers, and Mrs. Percy Sweetser 
of Reading, will serve as pourers 
at the coffee hour on Thursday, 
Ushers and hostesses from the 
Friends will include Mr. and Mrs, 
Royce H. Randlett, Mr. and Mr-. 
Frank B. Keller, Jr., Mr. and Mis. 
Donald L. Birehall. Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward H. Stone, Dr. and Mrs. 
Nelson Fonteneau, Mr. and Mrs. 
Bruce W. Young. 



A Classified 
brings Results. 



Ad in the Star 



preparation of fix< 
semi-annual basis, 
a past president 
Chapter. 



udgets on a 
Morrison is 
tl\e Boston 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 
January 15-31 




BRING THE 
"SUN" 
INDOORS 

WITH A NEW 

BENDIX 

AUTOMATIC GAS 

CLOTHES 
DRYER 



When Bendix comes into your 
home, you've put an end to all 
the work and weather worries 
associated with clothes drying. 
You can wash and dry any 
time, any day — come rain, snow 
or blow. Yes, Bendix dns 
your clothes indoors in a matter 
of minutes. You can have 
them damp-dry for ironing or 
fluff-dry for storing. And they'll 
be clean, sweet and practically 
wrinkle free. Ask for your 
trial Bendix — now! 



I CLIP THIS COUPON AND MAIL TODAY 



I 



I 



• Please deliver this BENDIX GAS CLOTHES DRYER 
to my home for a W-day trial without obligation. 




NAME ... 
ADDRESS 



| CITY _ 



ARLINGTON GAS 

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$ 

GAS CLOTHES DRY 

*249« 

{BUDGET TERMS IF DESIRED) 



LIGHT COMPANY 

AND ELECTRIC SYSTEM 

hester Tel. WI 6-0142 



s 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 19. l l >51 



\\ INCH KSTKK DISTRICT 
V I ItSINfl \SS()< I \TION 

The annual meeting and flection 
of officers 'if the Winchestei Dis- 
trict N'ursing Association will take 
place Wednesday, January 24, at 
the home <<;' Mrs. Edward K. Gros- 
venor, l'J Fenwiek road. Coffee, and 
dessert will he served at 1 :30 by 
Mrs. James Coon and her commit- 
tee, followed by the meeting at "J 
o'clock, with Dr. Richard J. Sheeny, 
Chief of Staff at the Winchestei 
Hospital, speaking on 'Civil De- 
fense" as- n applies to Winchestei 
citizens. 

WDN'A members, past and pres- 
ent, and those interested in the 
work of this Red Feather service 
agency, are cordially invited t '> 
'his meeting. Mrs. William K. 
Moffette will preside. 

The last In, aid meeting for 1950 
was held Friday in the General 
Assembly Room, Town Hall, with 
Mis. Moffette presiding. Mrs. Doris 
Wikhmd. executive director, re- 
ported <>n the work of the nurses. 
I'm Decembe) a month much 
busier for the nurses than was 
November, with (56 patients imdei 
pare, and 11!' visits. 

Mis. Wiklund. whose reports 
each month are lively ones, 
sparkled last Friday as she told of 
having twins under her care this 
past month — and how enjoyable 
those calls were. January of 1951, 
she stated, begins with new records 
for the Association. Mrs. Mary 
Clarke, office secretary, has made 
new card lists for the patients — 
a valuable piece of work. 

Mrs. Wiklund showed the mem- 
bers the new hot pack steamer and 
sterilizer, given to WDN'A by En 
Ka. which will lie put to immediate 
use. Siie told of the Christmas ac- 
tivities of the nurses, how the 
many wonderful U'it'ts donated by 
the Needlework Cuild had brought 
treat pleasure to many people, all 
ages. At the December staff 
meeting in the office at 540 Main 
street, the nurses were pleasantly 
surprised with eggnog and fruit 
cake, broughi in by Mrs. Moffette 
and Mrs. Guy IA\ ingstone. 

The board rejoiced at the news 
of Miss .lean Ma< Donald's engage- 
ment to Mr. William Dunn. 

All-. Wiklund spoke recently be- 
I' o i e the Alliance. Unitarian 
Church, and the members there 
donated five dollars toward the 
Comfort Fund of the mu ses I this 

money is used by the nurses to 
purchase little 'comforts" off the 
record tor patients from time to 
time i A 'grateful patient'' donated 
seven dollars to the fund at about 
the same time. Food baskets from 
the K. of C. and Elks, sent to 
names suggested by the nurses, 
made Christinas more pleasant foi 
many homes. 

Mis. Theodore Browne spoke 
warmly of Mrs. Wiklund's talk be- 
fore the Alliance, and added that 
it brought vital information to 
those present, as well as pleas- 
ure. 

Mrs. Guy Livingstone, chairman 
of the nursing committee, reported 
that collections from nurses' visits 
to patients were growing. Mrs. 
William Spaulding presented the 
treasurers' report, and Mrs. Ray- 
mond Holdsworth presented the 
Education Committee's report of 
the date, place anil speaker for the 
Annual Meeting. 

At this meeting on January 12, 
1951, three hoard members who 
have served their five year term 
with the Winchestei District Nurs- 
ing Association, sat on the hoard 
for the last time. They were Mr-. 
William Spaulding, Mrs. Edward 
Grosvenor, Mrs. James (Don. All 
three have served WDN'A loyally 
and richly, and their absence from 
the Incoming board will be sorely 
noticed. Mrs. Moffette paid de- 
served tribute to these members at 
the meeting, and hoped that they 
would return to the board in the 
future. Under the strict rules of 
the Association, board members' 
terms are limited to five years, and 
are rotating, in order to get the 
widest possible membership. 




V\ IN ION ( LI B 



FORI NIGHTLY NO TES 



At the next regular meeting "f 
The Fortnightly on Monday, Jan- 
uarv 2*-'nd. Mrs. Marion T. Rudkin. 
well known for her entertaining 
and excellent hook reviews, will be 
guest speaker in a program en- 
titled "Fact, Fiction and Fun." Mrs. 
Rudkin 's fine presentation of the 
best in books together with hei 
charm, wit, and clear judgment 
make her one of the most popular 
current literary speakers of the 
day. Those who have heard her 
talks enthusiastically agree that an 
afternoon with Mrs. Rudkin leaves 
nothing to he desired! 

Arts and ( rafts Exhibit 
Members are reminded of the 
Arts and Crafts Exhibition and 
Sale sponsored by the Division of 
the Massachusetts Federation to he 
held at Horticultural Hall. :'.i>" 
Massachusetts avenue, Boston, 
from February 22 t o March .'!. 
Everyone is urged to cooperate in 
making this the most memorable 
and successful exhibition of all. 

Pint l ies will be accepted in paint- 
ings of any type, in eraftwork such 
nietalv. ate, 



as painted furniture 
jewelry, leather work, hand made 
rugs, and in needlework, needle- 
point, crocheting and embroidery. 
Those members wishing to make 
entries should contact Mrs. Lestei 
I'. Leathers, Wl fi-0791. 

Department of Club Institute 
All Fortnightly members are wel- 
come to ( lub Institute meetings, 
the next one to be held Thursday 
morning, February 1. at Boston 
Y. W. C. A. on Clarendon street. 
Special Music: Mrs. Herbert 

Mann 

\rt and ( rafts Exhibit 

A special speaker on Internation- 
al Relations will provide a timely 
and interesting program. 

An entertaining skit will also 
presented by the Division of Li- 
terature and Drama. 



The Chairman of this year's Win- 
ton Club Cabaret, Mrs. Charles W. 
Butler, has the rehearsals well un- 
der w ay with the able assistance of 
her committee, Mrs. Vaughan Har- 
mon. Mrs. Harry P. Hood. Jr., Mrs. 
Carrick D. Kennedy and Mrs. 
Thomas Aldrich, Jr. 

Others who are filling impor- 
tant positions for the success of the 
Cabaret are: Mrs. Robert G. 
Thomason, and Mrs. John C. Willis 
wlio are doing the Program, Mrs. 
Robert C. Scott and Mrs. Everett 
P. Stone who are in charge of the 
Chances. Mis. Malcolm D. Ben- 
nett and Mis. Bertram H. Dube are 
doing the Publicity, while the tick- 
ets are under the able leadership of 
Mrs. Frank C. d'Elseaux, Mis. Mel- 
ville L, Hughes, Jr. and Mrs. Herb- 
ert T. Wadsworth. 

Mis. Albert S. Crockett and Mrs. 
II. N. Stevens are winking to- 
gether with the Costumes, and Mi s. 
Samuel S. Kirkwood is going to 
transform the Town Hall into a 
Night Club atmosphere. Mr. and 
Mis. J. Chandler Hill are in charge 
of the refreshments for the guests 
of the show, while Mi', and Mrs. 
James Dwinell, Jr. are serving 
them to the cast during rehearsals. 

Mrs. Stanley E. Neil! and Mrs. 
Charles L Moore have gathered 
| together sonic attractive girls to 
sell flowers, as well as Mrs. John 
Page and Mrs. Burton J. Gove who 
are in charge of the selling of 
cigarettes. 

Mrs. F. Manley Ives. Jr. is mak- 
ing over the Hall into a Night 
Club, being in charge of the Floor 
1 Committee and Mrs. John li. Ghir- 
ardini is again showing her talents 
in some of the musical numbers in 
the show, assisted by Mis. Irving 
K. Jennings. 

Mrs, Fiazen H. Ayer is in charge 
of the schedule for the make-up 
and Mis. Robert M. Smith foi Prop- 
erties. 

Quite 
already 
nights 



and Mrs. John Mooney, Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Sweetzer and Mr and 
Mrs. Philip Wadsworth. 

Saturday evening will find Mr. 
and Mis. Maurice T. Freeman en- 
tertaining at their home. Mr. and 
Mis. Theodore Chilcott, Mr. and 
Mis. George L. Connor, Dr. and 
Mrs. Bui ton Gove, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Hart, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
Hartridge, Mr. and Mrs, Robert 
Tonon and Mr. and Mrs. Raymond 
Holdsworth. 

At the Country Club, Mi- 
Mrs. Malcolm D. Bennett are 
ing a< their guests Mr. and 
Hiram Moody. Major and 
Frank Carter of Way-land 
( 



REMEMBER THE BIRDS 



Dr. 



ric H. Hansen, President of 
'he Massachusetts Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 
IKO l.ongwood avenue, Boston, yes- 
terday appealed to bird-lovers 
everywhere to help their feathered 
friends survive the extreme cold 
weathei by putting out food for 
them. During the bitter cold days, 
particularly when the ground 
covered w ith snow and ice, it , 
highly desirable that grain, bread 
crumbs, corn meal, etc., be spread 
where the birds can reach them, 
thus eliminating the possibility of 
suffering which might result 
through lack of their natural diet. 

"The most satisfactory method j 
of putting out f"od for them," 
stated the Society head, "is to place 
it on a large board with a molding 
around the edge. In this way it is 
not scattered or lost." 

"We cannot urge too strongly," 
concluded Dr. Han-en, "that every- 
one remember the birds, so that 
when spring arrives, these attrac- 
tive creatures will be with us once 
again with their beauty and song." 



i few dinner parties have 
been planned for both 
On Friday a large one is 
being given by Mrs. and Mrs. Theo- 
dore Burleigh, Jr., at their home 
and their guests w ill include M r. and 
Mis. Morton K. Olier, Jr.. Mr. and 
.Mi *, Joseph W. Butler. Mr. Wil- 
liam Gustiii, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
W. Armstrong, Jr., Captain and 
Mrs. Nelson C. Fontneau, Miss 
Mary Virginia I.oftus, Mr. Jeremiah 
Lorenti, Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. 
Stone, 2nd, and Mr. and Mrs. John 
T. Sexton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Svvanson 
are giving a small dinner at their 
home also on Friday and their 
guests w ill he Mr. and Mis. Arthur 
P. Schmidt. Mr. and Mis. Donald 
Puffer and Mr. and Mrs. Phillip 
Downs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hazen Ayr's 
guests at their home on Friday will 
ls be Mr. and Mrs. Kern Folkers, Mr. 

is 



and 
hav- 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
and 

lonel and Mrs. Otis M. Whitney 
of ( "oncord. 

Also entertaining at the Country 
Club are Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. 
Hallow and Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Kuypers. Their guests will be Mr. 
and Mrs. Melville Hughes. Jr.. Mr 
and Mrs. Lyndon Burnham, Mr. 
and Mis. Daniel Barnard. Mr. and 
Mrs. Kenneth Oady and Dr. and 
Mi s Harry Benson. 

Another large party at that club, 
with Mr. and Mrs. Paul Comins as 
host and hostess, will be Mr. and 
Mrs. David H. Walton, Mr. and 
Mrs. Adolph Haffenreffer of Fall 
River, Mr. and Mrs. Rolliston Lin- 
scott. Mr. and Mrs. John P. Ander- 
son of New York, Mrs. John T. 
Blanchard, Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
D. Kirkpatrick and Mr. and Mrs. 
] Richard S. Bullens of Melrose. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mac Arthur 
and Mr. and Mrs. George Black- 
wood are entertaining at the Black- 
.woods' home and their guests will 
be Mrs. Jean Stearns, Mr. Lee 
Todd. Mrs. Hamilton Dickey, Mr. 
and Mr-. Alvin Hitchcock, Mr. 
and Mrs Kenneth Wav, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Swift. Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Cunningham, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Lynch, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Vanner, Mr, and Mrs. Robert II. 
Smith. Mrs, Nancy Felt of Wilm- 
ington, Mr. William Holihan of 



O. Y. O. MINSTREL SHOW 
REHEARSES 

Sponsored by Rev. John P. O'Ri- 
ordan, beloved Pastor of St. Mary's, 
the annual Musical Production for 
the benefit of the C. Y. O. is now 
in rehearsal. The show, a com- 
bination minstrel and variety pro- 
duction, is scheduled for Winches- 
ter High School Auditorium on the 
afternoon and evening of .Saturday. 
February 3rd, with the afternoon 
performance primarily for chil- 
dren.. The cast comprises Win- 
chester talent exclusively, both 
youngsters and adults with solo 
and ensemble acts promising a 
most entertaining program. 
1 Since the seating is limited all 
planning to attend are urged to ob- 
tain their tickets promptly to avoid 
disappointment. 

Following are the committees: 

Honorary Chairman. Uev. J,»hn P. 
O'ltiolilah (' Y. it Director, Rev, Francis 
O'Neill; General Chairman. Philip Savage. 
Production Director, Mrs Vincent F. F.r- 
haol . Ti.-k.-t.s. Mi - Leo V M»noli, chair- 
man Mrs. B. Hubert Finn, Mrs, Michael 
1 Cohniilly, Mrs. Margaret Murray. Mr-, 
John .1. Gorman i Lighting Technician, 
Philip (lange : Lighting Assistant. Robert 
Loftus Property Manager, Michael .1. Con- 
n,ttl> : Sound Technician, Mr John Kvan . 
Costumes and Makeup, Mias Patricia Mv- 
Klhinney, i ch. . Mrs. John Lane. Mi s Wil- 
liam Dai.ey : Refreahrnertta '• Mrs Frank D. 
Woaf.-r. Mrs. John T. L.xini'y Ushers), 
Albert T. McDougall; Publicity, Vincent 

i V. Krhar't ; Posters Mrs. Coleman It Foley, 

Jr. 



WINCHESTER 
TO \STM1STRESS (III! 



on 
on 



The Winchester Toastmistress 
Club will meet at the home of Mrs. 
Marion Manning. 2°< Putnam road, 
Somerville. at 8 o'clock, Tuesday 
evening, January 

The principal speakers will be 
Mrs. Margaret Quirk of Woburn 
whose subject will be "My Trio 



Abroad", and Mrs. Olive Ander 
of Winchester who will speak 
"My Hobby — Hooked Rugs". 

The hostess will also serve as 
Top:.' Mistress foi the evening and 
announce the subject "Hobbies" for 
the two-minute extemporaneous 
speeches. 

There will be an election of offi- 
cers at this meeting, and the 
speeches will be evaluated by out- 
side evaluators. 



FRAMES FOR PHOTOGRAPHS | 

photograph will look best in a frame "Styled by 



Your 
Stevens." 

Beautiful hand finished 
easel back for standing. 

Modern frames for modern 



tvles for the wall or with hand made 



>tographa. 

Malcolm G. Stevens 

78 Summer Street ARlington 5-4112 

I Cor. Mill Street — NVnr Arlington (enter) 



A 



Cla.< 
s R 



sified Ad in the Star 



WHCri^-S 



Andover. Dr. and Mis. Ronald Wy- 
man, and Mi. and Mis. John W. 
Page. 

Also at their home on Saturday 
evening, Or. and Mrs. Frank f 
d'Elseaux aie entertaining Dr. and 
Mis. Alexander P. Aitken, Dr. and 
Mrs. Arthur licit ig. Dr. and Mrs 
San ford Moses, Or. and Mrs. Law- 
rence Trevett, Or. and Mrs. How 
aid divide,. Mr. and Mrs. R. Alan 
Page, Mr-. John 1. Donovan, and 
Mr. and Mi - .1. Warren Shoemaker 

Dining at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. Campbell Ross will be Mr. 
and Mrs. Dana Sawyer, Mr. and 
Mrs. Raymond Diekman, Mi. and 
Mrs. Colver P. Dyei and Mi. and 
M rs. Joseph Donnell. 




We ( 
get her. 
handled 
service, 
cient, 



0 LOCAL TmPlMARKS. Inc. 

on't jam your things to- 
Each piece is properly 
You'll like our moving 
fair prices as well as erli- 



Mi. Alex MacKenzie 
cbester, skied 
North Conway 
end. 



of Win- 
at Cranmore M'., 
N. IE, last week- 



CONTAGIOFS DISEASES 



Only two ease 
reported to the I 



BUILDING PERMITS 

The following Building permits 
were issued by the Building Com- 
missioner for week ending, Thurs- 
day, January 1 1 : 
New Dwellings: 
159 Cross street 
29 Grove street 
27 Prince avenue 
552 South Border road 
Alterations at: 

14 Brookside avenue 
71 Wedgemere avenue 
lit'iti Main street 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 
January 15-31 



if Dog Bite were 
ird of Health for 
ending, Thursday, Jan. 11. 
William B. MacDonald, Agent 

TYPEWRITERS 
REPAIRED 

WINSLOW 
PRESS 

^| 11 Common Street 





Twi M A RC H of PI M if 

V JANUARY 1S-11 



WINCHESTER CONSERVATORIES 

186 Cambridjre Street Call Winchester 6-0210 

or visit our spacious showrooms 



H.J.EMKME'*' 

4 1 INDENVT -WINCHESTER, MAU. 

9^.6*0568 

*4ilPHOHT< MtXT WHO <WW KKT* 



St. Mary's 5th Annual Show 



"MINSTRELS OF 1951" 

BENEFITING C.Y.O. ACTIVITIES 

BoV Scout-. (*irl Seoul-. Cull Scout". Brownie Scout-. 
Boys' and ( .irl-" Basketball. Boys' Baseball. Cirl- - Softball. 
Dramatic (.roup. 

At Winchester High School Auditorium 
Saturday, February 3rd 



TICKETS 

P. 



CIIII.DRKVS SHOW 2:0(1 
YMT IS' <l\n\\ 8:00 



P 



M, 
M. 



.60 
SI. 20 



l\< 
IM 



r v\ 

TAX 



CALL 

Mrs. Leo V. Manoli. Winchester 6 -2692 
Mrs. Michael J. Connolly, Winchester 6-t:<0.1-R 
Mrs. John Gorman, Winchester 6-2313 
Mrs. Margaret Murray. W inchester 6-036! -W 
Mrs. U. Robert Linn, Winchester «-077s 
St. Mary's Sodality 
St. Mary's Holy Name Societ) 
Knights of ( olumhus 



janlfl-St 



"IT'S LIKE HAVING A STORE RIGHT IN 

OUR HOME!!" 




LET US PLAN 



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of fresh-frozen foods on hand for 
any emergency. "Go to the store" 
in your own home — enjoy out-of- 
season treats all year long, with this 
Crosley Custom Freezer (Model 
CCF-8). Smartly styled with self- 
opening safety lid, interior flood 
light, adjustable sections, built-in 
lock. Big, 8.2 cubic foot capacity. 



low**! Budget T«fm« 



"TAKING 
STOCK' 



K\«*ry month . . every wct'k . . . 
every day is invvntury-tukins time 
•n uiir Prescription I.aLKtrat.>ry, It's 
ik never-ending proceM because »e 
must maintain full tuppHew of ap- 
proved drugs and chemicals at all 
times. And to insure freshness and 
potency, we keep our stocks con- 
stancy replenished Though some 
drugs may rarely be called for. they 
are here "in stock " when your doc- 
tor requires them for you. 



For Your Present Home 

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2A MT. VERNON STREET 
— KITCHEN SPECIALISTS - 

• Hotpoint Appliances • Youngstown Sinks 

• Hoover Cleaners • Kitchen Maid Cabinet* 
« Roper Gas Ranges • Maytag Washers 

During Alterations Caused By Fire 

Call Winchester 6-3061 or Winchester 6-0417 
Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



COMB/NATION 
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' K " che " Heating 



Here's just the Range for hard-to-heat 
kitchens — the L & H automatic com- 
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At Edison Shops and Electrical Dealers 




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Iflti 394 WASH ST.jftjl 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR, FRIDAY. JANUARY 19. 1951 



9 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHl SETTS 

■Middlesex. IS. Superior Court 

In Equity No. ldsC!:; 

To 

HARRIS M. PARKER and Gt NHILD 
I. PARKER. b.,!h of Winchester in the 
County of Miridleaex, 



ind 



.!] whom it may concern : 



EMS J. NELSON, of said Winchester, 

claiming Ui be the holder of a first mort- 
gage revering the premises situated at >ii 
Vine street, said wtochetfter, 

giv.r, by HARRIS M. PARKER and Gt'N- 
HII.II I. PARKER, husband and wife a- 
tenanta by th# entirety dated November 
20. 1942, recorded with Middlesex South 
District Deedi, Hook ».<■ 1 - . Page 23, 

has filed with said Court a bill in equity 
for authority to foreclose said mortgage in 
the following manner: by entry and pos- 
session and exercise of power of sale, 

to sciie certain real property covered by 
said mortgage. 

If you are entitled Ut the benefits of the 
Soldiers' and Sailors" Civil Relief Act of 
1040 as amended, and you object to auch 
foreclosure or seizure, you or your at- 
torney should file a written appearance and 
answer in the office of the Clerk of said 
Court at Cambridge on or In-fore the 
nineteenth day of February. A. D. 1981, or 
you may be forever burred from claiming 
that such foreclosure or .seizure is invalid 
under said act. 

Witness, JOHN P. HIGGINS. Esquire, 
Chief J. .Mice of saiii Court this fifteenth 
day of January, A D 19$). 

Frederic I.- Putnam, Clerk. 



t OMMON WEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the petition 
for adoption of ROBERT HIM < E GALE of 
Winchester in -aid County. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court b> < HAKI.ES S. EATON and 
SARAH S. EATON, his wife of Winches- 
ter m said County, praying for leave to 
said ROBERT BRUCE GALE, a 
child of DONALD SPRAGLE GALE of 
Rowayton in the State of Connecticut ami 
SARAH S. (.ALE. his wife and that the 

name of said child 1 hanged to ROBERT 

BRICK EATON. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file « written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
fifteenth day of February, 1951, the return 
day of this citation. 

Witness, John C. I.eggai. Esquire, First 
Judge of s„i,i Court, this twelfth day of 
Jan urv in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one 

John J. Itutler, Register. 

janl9-St 



STRRflD 



WOburn 2-0696 
Mat. 1:45 Eve. 6::i0 font. 
Sat. Sun. Holidays Continuous 

NOW THRU SATURDAY 

HARRIET CRAIG 

Joan Crawford - Wendell Corey 

THE FULLER BRUSH 
GIRL 

Lucille Ball - Kddie Albert 



Sun.. Mon., Jan 21, 22 

COPPER CANYON 

Rav Milland - Hedy l.amarr 

DARK CITY 

Den Defnre - I.iiabfth Scott 

Tues., W»d . .Ian 2:1. 24 

NO WAY OUT 

Richard Widmark - Linda Darnell 

BLONDE DYNAMITE 

Leo Gorrey - Bowery Boys 

Starts Thurs.. Jan. 25 

KING SOLOMON'S MINE 



NIYERSITY 



NOW THRU SATURDAY 

Dana Andrews - Farley Granger 
Joan Evans 

EDGE (>F DOOM 



David Nlven - Shirley Temple 

\ KISS FOR CORLISS 



CHILDREN'S MOVIE 
Sat., Jan 20 at in A. M 

DESTINATION MOON 



An Our Gang Comedy 
Pirates on the High Seas" No. 10 



Itin., Mon.. Tues., Jan. 21. 22, 23 
Fred Astaire - Rettv Button 

LET'S DANCE 



Charlie Chaplin - Marie Dressier 

Tii i.iE's n Nc n red 

ROMANCE 

Wed.. Thurs. PH., Sat Jar 31 25, 26, 2T 
Harold Uovd 

M \D N\ EDNESD \ i 

Irene Dunne - Fred MarMurra* 

M \ KM \ Dl I I. 
MOMENT 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
Mid. Ilesex. .sa. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
MA LINDA A. SIMON'DS late of Winches- 
ter in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court for jo', bate <tf a certain instrument 
purporting to be the ast will of said de- 
ceased b> LINDA F. HA MB LIN of Acton 
in said County, praying that she be ap- 
pointed executrix thereof, without giving 
a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to ohject thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the fore-noon on the 
sixth day of February, 1951, the return day 
of this ruation. 

Wilues-,, John C. I-eggat. Esquire. First 
Judge of said CoUrt, this eleventh day of 
January in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one. 

John J Itutler. Register. 

janlO-H 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSAf Hl'SEI TS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons Interested in the estate of 
FRANK J. HENNESSEY, late of Win- 
chester in saitl County, deceased. 

The administrator of said estate has 
presented to said Court his first and sec- 
ond accounts for allowance and a petition 
for distribution of the balance in his 
hands. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance ill said Court at Cambridge 
before ten o'c ock in the forenoon on the 
fourteenth day of February. 1951, the re- 
turn day of this citation. 

Witness. John C, Leggat 
Judge of said Court, thi- 
January in the year one 
hundred and fifty-one 
John J 



Esquire, First 
ninth day of 
thousand nine 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the trust 
estate under the will of CLARA L. POM! 
late of Winchester in said County, deceased, 
for the benefit of MARION W. POND. 

Th- trustees at said estate have presented 
to said Court for allowance their sixth to 
eighth accounts inclusive. 

If you desire to object thereto you or j 
your attorney should file a written appear- 
ance in said Court at Cambridge before ten 
o'c 'H-k in the forenoon on the twenty-sec- 
ond lay of January 1951, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, John C, I.eggat. Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this twenty sixth day 
of December in the year one thousand nine 
h ndred and fifty. 

John J. Butler, Register. 

jan5-3t 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Mid lb-sex, it. Probate Court. 

To all person.- interested in the estate of 1 
Rll HARD S. TAYLOR late of Win. hosier 
in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court, praying thai CHARLOTTE T. 
KING of Maiden in said County, be ap- 
pointed administratrix of said estate, with- 
out giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 1 
your attorney should file a written ap- ; 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the twenty- 
ninth day of January. 1951, the return day 
,f thi- citation. 

Witness. John C, Leggat, Esquire. First 
Judge of said Court, this eighth day of 
January in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Iluth-r. Register. 

junl2-nt 



•BRANNAN PLAN" 
POWER 



FOR 



Butler, Register. 

janl!'-3t 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACH1 SETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
FLORENCE W. B1TI.ER late of Win- 
Chester in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court for probate of a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will of said de- 
based b> CHARLES W. BITI.ER and 
HAZES' H. AYER of Winchester in said 
County, praying that they be appointed ex- 
ecutors thereof, without giving a surety on 
their bonds. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
twenty-third day of January 1951, the re- 
turn dny of this citation. 

Witness. John C. I.eggat. Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this third day of 
Jamiarj in the year one t hot sand nine 
hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Butler, Register. 

janj-St 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
( HAKI.ES H. DAVIS, late of Winchestel 
in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court for probate of a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will of said de- 
ceased by GERTRUDE L. DAVIS of Win- 
chester in said County, praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof, without giv- 
ing a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
thirtieth day of January l'.iM, the return 
day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat. Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this eighth day of 
January in the year one thousan 1 nine 
hundred and fifty-one 

John J. Butler, Register. 

janl2-3t 



STAR ADS 
BRING RESULTS 



Wl E . M . L O E W % 
IMCHESTER 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
ELIZABETH ARMISTEAD late of Win- 
» lu-sier in said County, deceased. 
I The administrator of sai l estate has pre- 
I sen ted to said Court for allowance his first 
! account. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
I your attorney shou'd file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the thirtieth 
day of January 1951, the return day of 
: this citation. 

Witness, John ('. Leggat, Esquire, First 
[Judge of said Court, this twenty-ninth day 
' of December in the year one thousand nine 
; hundred and fifty. 

jnnl2-:it 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To ul. persons interested In the estate of 
DONALD II HERRIDGE late of Winches* 
ter in said County, deceased, 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court, praying that M ARYROSE B. Mr- 
DEV1TT of Winchester in said County, be 
i appointed administratrix of said estate. 
! without giving n surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
'. your attorney should file a written appear- 
lance in said Court at Cambridge before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the twenty* 
ninth day of January 1951, the return day 
i of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this fourth dny of 
! January in the yeai one thousand nine hun- 
dred and fifty-one. 

John J. Btltler, Register. 

janl'J-:',t 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To till persons interested In the estate of 
PATRICK <)I l(il.E\ late of Winchester in 
said County, deceased. 

A petition lias been presented to said 
Court for probate of a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will of said de- 
ceased by PHILIP P. DEVER of Woburn 
I in said County, praying that he he ap- 
pointed executor thereof. 

If you "desire to object thereto you or 
| your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in saiil Court at Cambridge be- 
i fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
thirty-first day of January 1A51, the re- 
j turn day of this citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat, Esquire, First 
1 Judge of said Court, this fifth day of 
January in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Butler, Register. 

janl'.VIt 



Editor of the Star: 

Several week.- ago you published 
an article by me dealing with the 
Federal Government's proposal to 
create River Valley Authorities and 
Hydro-Electric power on New Eng- 
land Rivers. 

Since then the President's Water 
Resources Policy Report, dated De- 
cember 18, 1950, has been issued, it 
being Vol. II. due in January of 
this year, will give case histories of 
10 liver basins, five in the west 
and five in the east. Vol. Ill, sched- 
uled for February, will deal with 
the applicable law and new legisla- 
tion recommended. Vol. I may be 
had of the Supt. of Documents, 
Washington, D. C, for ?3.25. 

The following discussion of the 
Hvdl'O-power part of the report bv 
Mr. D. J. Guy of the National Re"- 
sources Dept. of the Chamber of 
Commerce of the United States, en- 
titled "A 'Brannan Plan' for 
Power." should be of interest to the 
people of New England e v e n 
though they have not read the Vol. 
I report, or do not care to invest 
$3.25 for a copy, Mr. (lay's com- 
ments would seem to back up my 
statement's in the article you pub- 
lished some weeks ago. 

The New England governors are 
to hold a meeting January 23 on 
this, and related subjects. To any 
one interested in this important 
matter this meeting might prove 
to be well worth attending, in or- 
der that he may find out if the 
."welfare philosophy" argument is 
valid for "cheap" bread, "cheap" 
shoes, "cheap" electric irons and 
socialism, as well as power, as Mr. 
Guy says in his discussion of the 
Federal Report, which follows. 

Incidentally, Rep. Joseph Martin 
in the Boston Herald of January 15 
confirms the statements of Mr. 
Guy as to the Administration's so- 
cialistic advisors. It is time to 
have another Tea Party and elimi- 
nate such advisors before they 
wreck the Country. 

E. D. Fletcher, 

8 Lagrange street 



sources programs. Benefits which 
are primarily public, or which can- 
not be assessed against particular 
beneficiaries, should be non-reim- 
bursable, to be covered out of 
public revenues. 

This last hypothesis appears to 
present a dilemma in the case of 
"power." The power benefit i s 
readily assessable as a local benefit 
for which there need be no subsidy 
or contribution out of "public re- 
venues." The Commission gets 
around its own guidepost by set- 
ting up another. It argues that 
the public interest requires "cheap" 
power and abundant and wide- 
spread use of power which, appar 
ently, it thinks i s a federal re- 
sponsibility. 

Are we to believe that Ameri- 
can industry and American house- 
holders are unable to pay the full 
cost of electric utility service and. 
therefore, the "public interest" re- 
quires that they get it, at least in 
part, at federal expense? This is 
the feature of the report that will, 
no doubt, cause the greatest con- 
troversy. Do the American peo- 
ple need a "Brannan Plan" for 
power - - a plan of tow consumer 
costs and high book values to justi- 
fy the undertaking? Are we so 
near the poorhouse that we need 
federal aid for this public service? 
Even if we were, it is difficult to 
see the benefit to the "general wel- 
fare" in reducing the customer's 
light bill and adding the reduction 
to his tax bill. 

In the multi-purpose develop- 
ment of a river system, power is 
relied upon more than any other 
benefit to support project feasibil- 
ity. Even the debatable prefer- 
ences to public agencies and dis- 
tributors can be accepted in some 
degree. But a readily vendible by- 
product like power needs no cut- 
rate policy ami no subsidy at the 
expense of the Nation's taxpayers 
in order to get full value from this 
river resource. Power can and 
should pay its way. 

I). J. Guy, Manager 
Natural Resources Dept. 




• This inexpensive, easy-to-read 
book will help you get better 
snapshots with your camera. 
There are 240 pages with hun- 
dreds of illustrations covering such 
subjects as indoor shots, pictures 
in color, posing, correct exposure, 
portraits, plus many others. Stop 
in today for your copy. 



Winchester (mm <m 

tyou* £vcal jbtcdtA, 
570 MAIN <T. • WI-6 0952 • WINCHESTER 



NOTICE OF LOST PASS BOOK 



SEE 2 FEATURES LATE AS S» P.M. 
TODAY THRU SATURDAY 
M \T 2 P. M. EVE. CONT. FROM «:S0 

Hurt LnncRNter - Dorothy Mi-fl ire 

MISTER 880 

Edmund Gwenn 
PLUS 



THE SKIPPER 

Robert Walker - .loan Leslie 
Edward Arnold 



NOTE! EVERY SAT. MAT. ! 
Full l.enuth Western Feature 
plus "Pirates ..f IIi(rh Sens" 
IN ADDITION TO REGULAR 
FEATURES 



In connection with the requirements of 
Chapter 167, Section 20, of the General 
Laws ami Acts in amendment thereof or 
supplementary thereto, notice is hereby 
given of the loss of Pass Hook GI 7 t DR. 45:i 
issued by the Winchester Cooperative Hank 
ami thai written application has been nia'le 
to said hank for the payment of the amount 
of the deposit represented by said book 
or for the issuance of duplicate book there- 
for 

WINCHESTER COOPERATIVE HANK 
By Ernest It. Kusti.s. Treasurer 
jan."-:it 

WINCHESTER UK. II SCHOOL 
BRIEFS 



SUN. - MON. - TUKS. 
Jan. 21. 22. 83 
NOTE! "ALL ABOUT EVE" 

(in Screen Sun. at H :4f> ami 7 ::I5 
M..n. - Tues. on Screen 2:45 and B P. M. 

SEE THE AWARD PICTURE OF THE 
YEAR! 

SHOW CONTINUOUS SUN. FROM 2 

MON. - Tl'ES MAT STARTS 1:30 
EVE. CONT. FROM (5:30 

Bette Davis - Anne Baxter 

ALL ABOUT EVE 

George Sanders - Celeste Holm 
PLUS 

MILITARY ACADEMY 



Continuous Daily from 1:30. 



COMING I D\YS 
WED THRU SAT 
Jan. 2 4 - 27 

IN TECHNICOLOR 

I'LL GET BY 

P.i I Lundigan - June Haver 
PLUS 

Elizabeth Tavlor - Robert Taylor 

CONSPIRATORS 



THE NEW 



Matinees at 2 P. M. 



I Evenings from 6:30 p. M. 

5TONEHAM i ^ • n 



3 P. M. 



GRAND OPENING SUNDAY OF YOUR BEAUTIFUL 
NEW THEATRE "THE ST0NEHAM" 

Every effort has been made to present to you a theatre 
for vour enjoyment and comfort that will offer you 
America's favorite entertainment at a minimum cost to 
vour entire family! 



OPENING PROGRAM JANUARY 21-22-23 

Iteautiful Technicolor 



Har 



P 
L 

June Haver U 
James - Gloria DeHaven S 



The Most Darin* 
Picture of 1950! 



Screened Sunda. at 9:25 
Mon and lu*v at 3:25 - *:»» 



Screened >cnii.n at S:0.1 
Men and Tues. 
at 3 :• 5 - SsEfl - 9iM 



WEDNESDAY IS REVIEW D.U 

"FLESH AND FANTASY" 

Also 

Mann Montei - Turhan Hey in 

"RAIDERS OF THE DESERT" 

THURSDAY - FRIDAY - SA I L KDA V .JAN I A H\ 23 -26 -27 
So Wonderful It'll Make You Feel So Good: 

"MR. 880" 

Starring - Hurt Lancaster - Dorothy McCuire - Edmund tiwenn 
..luw.i At — 2:2i and 

AND The Kins at Cowboys ROY ROGERS — in 

"SUNSET IN THE WEST" 



Paul Boyle, president of the Stu- 
dent Council, was elected by vote 
of the entire school in a close elec- 
tion to be the delegate from Win- 
chester High .School eligible to be 
for one day later in the year gover- 
nor, lieutenant governor, senator, 
representative, or a member of a 
special committee as youngsters 
from all over Massachusetts take 
over State government for a day. 

Mid-year examinations have been 
in progress since Wednesday of 
this week. 

As a direct contrast to the ten- 
sion of examination days will be 
the relaxation tomorrow night at 
the annual Winter Sports Dance 
sponsored by the Athletic Associa- 
tion. 

The assembly last Friday morn- 
ing, one of the most successful ever 
staged at the High School, was a 
concert by the combined orches- 
tras of Winchester and Arlington. 
Good musicianship by members of 
both orchestras gave a quality to 
, the concert that was no little en- 
i hanced by the balance of stringed 
I instruments and the wind and per- 
cussion instruments. 

The combined orchestra was led 
alternately by Mr. Fred Felniet, 
local supervisor of music, and by 
Mr Kinzig of Arlington. The pro- 
gram consisted of semi-classical 
and popular music, the excellent 
rendition of "Sleigh Hide" being 
most familiar of the numbers and 
most frequently hummed in the 
corridors throughout the day. 




TOWN OF WINCHESTER 

W \RR \NT FOR TOWN 
MEETING 

ORDERED: That the war- 
rant for the Annual Repre- 
sentative Town Meeting to 
be held in March 1981 be 
closed at 4:30 o'clock P. M. 
on Monday, January "20, 1951 
and '.hat public notice thereof 
be given by publication of 
this order in the three (3) 
consecutive issues of the 
"Winchester Star'' preceding 
said date. 

Vincent Farnsworth. Jr. 
Harry E. Chefalo 
Richard C. Cunningham 
Nicholas H. Fitzgerald 
Harrison F. Lyman, Jr. 



Sek 



•tmen of Winchester 

janl2-3t 



Many features of the -150-page 
report of the President's Water Re- 
sources Policy Commission, re- 
leased December 18, 1050. warrant 
the most careful analysis. Hydro 
power, reclamation, flood control, 
water transportation, pollution con- 
trol, are important* to mention only 
a few. Hydro power tops the list 
for several reasons. Hydro power 
is the root and stem that supports 
the physical, political and economic 
theses which appear to have domi- 
nated the Commission's thinking. 

The report itself is not so much a 
"report" as it is an argument - - an 
argument designed to show that 

I the evolution in river development 

I over the past generation or so is 
none other than the unfolding of a 
plan conceived in the 1910-20 de- 
cade, written into law in the Fed- 

1 oral Water Power Act of 1920 and 
now being put into practice by its 
principal practitioner, the Interior 
Department. The trend, according 

; to the Commission, has always 
been "towards federal development 
and operation of all water power, 
subject to the jurisdiction of Con- 
gress." And, some wit has said that 
this jurisdiction now extends "from 
the sink to the sea " 

The power philosophy of the re- 
port is a "welfare" philosophy 
Power is always "cheap" power or 
"low-cost" power. If the returns 
for government power do not cover 
all the costs of a project that a 
private company would bear, still 
there is no subsidy because, argues 
the Commission, cheap power is in- 
the public interest and "where the 
public interest is clearly estab- 
lished, public expenditures to pro- 
mote it cannot properly be regarded 

' as subsidies." To say the least, this 
seems like oversimplification of the 
controversial and many-sided mat- 
ter of subsidies. If valid for power, 
why not "cheap" bread, "cheap" 
shoes, "cheap" electric irons - - and 
Socialism ? 

In respect to power, the Com- 
mission goes considerably beyond 
the basic question of resources de- 
velopment, The Commission seems 
little concerned with the marketing 
of agricultural products produced 
on reclamation land, but it evi- 
dences great concern over the mar- 
keting of electric power. It goes 
even beyond the notion that power 
is a by-product of river develop- 
ment and says that : 
"Where the federal government 

. assumes a major responsibility for 
the power supply to distribution 
systems, this should be recognized 
as a utility responsibility, requir- 
ing the construction of new gen- 
erating capacity, whether hydro 
electric of steam-electric, well in 
advance of expanding needs." 

Thus the mere fact of river de- 
velopment is allowed to precipitate 
the federal government into the 
electric utility business. By a parity 
of reasoning, navigation would re- 
quire federal construction of rail- 
roads or the operation of trucks 
in basins where navigation facil- 
ities were not adequate to meet the 
people's transportation needs. This 
kind of expansion would quickly be 
turned down as inappropriate, no 
doubt, but still the power feature, 
because of its dominating influence 
on the Commission's thinking, goes 
all the way. 

The Commission says that for 
each project there are national and 
basin objectives and there are 
public and private benefits. Mone- 
tary returns would b e expected 
from local and private benefits but, 
to quote the Commission, "the 
principle of full reimbursement has 
ceased to be useful or necessary. 
The federal government i s the 
great equalizer in this economic 
hiatus as its "basic justification is 
predicated on the considerations of 
the general welfare." The Commis- 
sion goes so far as to say that: 

"If the good or service is vital to 
the well-being of the community, 
full reimbursement may be re- 
garded as detrimental to the gen- 
eral welfare, and reduced as a mat- 
ter of public policy." 

After laying down its general ap- 
proach, the Commission proceeds 
in its anaylsis of basin development 
on the theory that "public bene- 
fits should be recognized as the 
reason for and justification of 
public investment i n water re- 



PR ESI DENT SAYS WE ARE 
NOT AT WAR! 

Editor of the Star: 

At his weekly news conference 
January 4, President Truman told 
the reporters that "the United 
States is not at war," and since 
then he has reiterated that state- 
ment. His "policemen," the gallant 
United States Marines, do not' 
agree with him, I am told, and 
neither does anybody else of aver- 
age intelligence and common sense 
SO far as I have been able to learn. 
(.In their matchless, orderly retreat 
from the frozen, snow covered hills 
of northeast Korea to the beach of 
embarkation ,they held at bay, with 
outstanding bravery, Mr. Acheson's 

Communist hordes. This isn't war, 
it's just "police duty"; that's all the 
President proposed to use them for. 

Our Secretary of State sided ' 
with the Communists against the 
Chinese Nationalists, thus facilitat- 
ing: the defeat and slaughter of our 
boys who were sent into a distant 

". land of ice and snow, poorly equip- 

| ped, and half clothed. This was 
flOne by President Truman without < 

i the consent of Congress which; 
alone had the right to do it. Thus ! 
has resulted the unprecedented 
spectacle of Acheson's Communists 

! fighting Truman's "policemen". 

It isn't surprising that Mr. Tru- 
man doesn't recognize war when he 

; sees it. When the State Depart- 
ment, every college and university 
in the land, and every industry 
were infiltrated by Communists; 
when the F. B, I. had a record of 
fifty thousand in this country 
when the facts were brought to the 

: attention of the President, he pooh- ' 
poohed it and called it a "red her- 
ring." I wonder if he knows now 
that there really are Communists 
in this country. 

President Roosevelt gave us 
Pearl Harbor and the second World 
War and by secret commitments to 
Stalin and at Potsdam laid the 
foundation for President Truman 
and Secretary Acheson to give 
Russia control of Europe, Commu- 
nist China and. then, to stage the 
debacle of Korea. 

We are outnumbered and defeat- 
ed in Korea, while a well-trained 
army of 200,000 men in near-by j 
Formosa is anxious to help us by ! 
making a diverting attack on the 
Chinese mainland which might be 
our salvation but is prevented by 
the Secretary of State, because he 
has f a v o r e d the Communists 
against the Nationalist Formo- 
sans. 

Everybody should read carefully 
ex-President Hoover's speech of 
December 20, 1050, which Basil 
Brewer has republished "as a 
public service," in his New Bed- 
ford (Mass.) Standard-Times. It 
was also published in the Boston 
Herald on Thursday, January 1 
The address is outstanding and 
makes an excellent foundation fur 
the conflicting opinions concerning 
the further study and appraisal of 
the wisest course for our country 
to pursue in the present crisis. 

Europe is socialist and socialism 
is the "gateway to Communism.'' 
We cannot save western Europe 
from Communism by going to war 
with Russia, even if we should win 



Now and then we hear somebody 
declare, "Russia will not fight; she 
does not want war." Why should 
she? She has conquered Europe 
and Asia without firing a shot. 
She is waiting for us to go bank- 
rupt so she can take over with her 
Communist forces. The more sup. 
plies we send to western Europe 
trucks, tanks, arms, food, indus- 
tries, the better she will like it. 
She knows that in her own time, as 
things are now going, it will all be 
hers without firing a shot, as it was 
in China. 

Ever and anon we hear a wail 
against the so-called isolationists; 
this moan, for the most part, comes 
from professors and others whose 
heads are so full of the knowledge 
of other men's writings that there 
is no room for wisdom. It has not 
yet been demonstrated that the iso- 
lationists are wrong. The great- 
ness of this country, its institutions 
and industries, were founded upon 
isolation and free enterprise. For 
two hundred and fifty years we cov- 
ered the oceans with our ships of 
commerce, We traded with all peo- 
ples, sold them our goods and 
bought theirs. We were on good 
terms with them We hewed for- 
ests from the wilderness, built 
cities, railroads, industries, and 
universities, without the help or 
dictation of Communist labor lead- 
ers — we prospered. We were the 
envy of all the nations of earth that 
struggled with socialism, a system 
of government that has never suc- 
ceeded or helped the masses. We 
were all wrong, say the interna, 
tionalists and ought to know bet- 
ter. They have tried every other 
form of government and haven't 
been able to earn a decent living 
yet. It is all very well to help your 
poor relations but it isn't necessary 
to live and sleep with them. 
"Born by a law that compels men 

to be, 

Born to conditions we couldn't fore- 
see, 

Born by a law through all nature 

the same, 
What makes us differ and who Is 
to blame " 

Daniel C. Dennett. M. D. 
7 Washington street 



EXTENDING HANDS OF 
FRIENDSHIP 



the war. What sense is there in 
fighting to prevent something that 
already exists? Do you want Com- 
munism? Well, this country is 

1 moving rapidly in that direction. 
If the policies of President Truman 
could be carried out, the United 
States would soon be bankrupt as 
Lenin, Russian social philosopher, 
predicted it would be. In No. 34, 

: "Clipping of Note," The Founda- 
tion for Economic Education, Inc., 
states, "Communism and socialism, 
in most respects, are the same 
thing. Marx was a socialist by his 
own definition. Russia, after the 
Communist revolution, became the 
U. S. S. R. — the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics." Both believe 
in governmental ownership and 
control of industries and wealth. 
Since 1922 government ownership 
of wealth, land excluded, in our 
country has increased from 10 per 
cent to more than 20 per cent, ac- 
cording to the National Bureau of 
Economic Research. "Practically 
every business, large or small, is 
affected by some form of govern- 
mental licensing control" — permit 
to engage in some business or ac- 



The following editorial is from 
the pen of Charles E, Broughton, 
editor of "The Sheboygan Press", 
Sheboygan, Wis. It appeared 
Thursday, January 4. 

"The people of Winchester, Mass.. 
and Hemroulle, Belgium, are writ- 
ing a new chapter in the interna- 
tional goodwill story that began in 
Belgium during the Battle of the 
Bulge in 1944. It's a story that 
warms the heart, especially in 
these days when we hear and read 
so much about people who are at 
each other's throats. 

Next Sunday 10 paintings, each 
depicting a Station of the Cross, 
will be presented to the churches 
of Winchester, both Catholic and 
Protestant. The paintings, by an 
unidentified artist, have been 
traced back to 1820, but may be 
older, They were part of a group 
of 14 that adorned the chapel of 
Notre Dame at Hemroulle. The 
other four were destroyed by Ger- 
man shells. 

The story began on a winter 
night six years ago when elements 
of the 101st airborne infantry, un- 
der Lt. Col. John Hanlon of Win- 
chester, moved into Hemroulle, a 
suburb of Bastogne. The ground 
was bare when they arrived, but 
later that night it snowed, leaving 
the troops easy targets for the 
Germans. 

Col. Hanlon went to the town 
mayor, Victor Gaspard, with his 
problem. The ringing of the 
church bells summoned the popu- 
lace. The mayor asked the people 
to give up their bed sheets and 
other white linen to serve as emer- 
gency camouflage for the Amer. 
leans. Within a short time every 
available piece of white cloth had 
been given to the soldiers. This 
was done despite the fact that linen 
was a war-time luxury. 

Not a single American life was 
lost during the time the American 
troops remained in the village, 
thanks to the willingness of the 
villagers to come to the aid of the 
tioops. 

When the troops left, they did 
not bother to return the sheets. 
They were occupied with the job of 
pursuing the German forces, whose 
drive had failed. But three years 
later a reporter traveling through 
Hemroulle heard the story from 
residents, who said they were 
grateful for deliverance and were 
willing to sacrifice the linen. At 
the same time they expressed doubt 
that they would be able to replace 
the linen with post-war prices so 
high. The reporter wrote to Col. 



Hanlon, explaining what the sheets 
had meant to the Belgians. 

Col. Hanlon wrote the story of 
his battle experience for a Boston 
newspaper. Within a few days he 
had received donations of 740 
sheets from readers of his article. 
The colonel went to Hemroulle to 
distribute the sheets, enough to 
supply the villagers for years to 
come. 

Last summer, while Albert 
Navez, Belgian consul in Boston, 
was visiting in Hemroulle, the vil- 
lagers were discussing a suitable 
gift for the people of Winchester. 
The consul suggested the paintings 
of the remaining 10 Stations of the 
Cross. 

These paintings will be presented 
lit ceremonies in the Winchestel 
High School auditorium Sunday. 
The program will be broadcast to 
Hemroulle and elsewhere in Europe 
and Asia by a Boston short-wave 
station. On the stage to receive 
the paintings will be pastors of 
Catholic, Baptist, Episcopal, Con- 
gregational, Unitarian and Method- 
ist churches and a reader for the 
Christian Science church. Ten 
churches will be represented ami 
each will receive a painting. 

There you have an example of 
friendliness and goodwill among 
the people of a community and be- 
tween Americans and the people of 
a community overseas. The spur 
of goodwill has not given away en- 
tirely, even though the day's news 
may tend to make us believe other- 
wise. The Wlnchester.Hemroulle 
story renews our faith that some 
day the masses of the people of our 
country and other countries of the 
world will get through to each 
other in the cause of peace. We 
have read many touching letters 
written by persons in European 
countries in appreciation of gifts 
sent to them by individuals and 
groups in our country. Surely, 
some day these acts of kindness 
will help build a new world on an 
entirely new plane." 



BUILDING FOB THE YEAR 
1950 

T he Building Commissioner's 
office has made public the following 
tabulation of building activity in 
Winchester for the year, 1050. 
450 building permits issued 
420 plumbing permits 

lit beating permits 
2t5.'l gas permits 
025 wiring permits 
150 new single dwellings SI ,606,000 
.'18 new detached garages 24,250 
1 Shop and garage 0,000 
1 Storage building 4.HO0 
I Tool houses 1,300 
1 Commercial Garage 23,000 

$1,068,350 
Additions and Alterations to 
Dwellings 7H.114 
Garages 11,100 
Mfg. Bldg. 31,000 
Bowling Alley 500 
Stores 67,400 
Winchester Hospital 761,000 
Marycliff Academy 150,000 

1,000,174 

«2,707,524 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES FOR 
1 050 

The following list of contagious 
diseases has been released for '.he 
year, 1950, by William B. Mac- 
Donald, agent for the Board of 
Health: 

Polio 2 

Chicken-pox 78 

Dog Bite 00 

Meningitis Menocc 1 

German Measles 2 

Measles 3Q 

Mumps :{ 

Scarlet Fever 14 

Pulmonary T. B 3 

Whooping Cough 48 

Venereal Disease 1 

251 

HIGH SCHOOL PREPARES 
JUNIOR - SENIOR PLAY 

Albert Casella's "Death Takes a 
Holiday ". to be presented by the 
senior and junior classes of Win- 
chester High School on Saturday 
evening, February 17, at 8:15, is 
considered an extremely difficult 
play for high school students to 
perform. Compared to last year's 
famous senior-junior play, "Mother 
is a Freshmen", which won an 
eight-page spread in Life Maga- 
zine, "Death Takes a Holiday" will 
be completely different, as it is true 
drama at its best. 

This play will take every ounce 
of effort from the very versatile 
member of the high school faculty, 
Mr. Thoma.s Morse, and his enthu- 
siastic cast of thirteen seniors and 



10 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19. 1951 



PUT YOUR MONEY TO WORK 
FOR YOU SAFELY AT A BETTER RETURN { 

INVEST IN PAID-UP SHARES 




EXCLUSIVE LISTINGS 



CURRENT EARNINGS 

2Vj% 

Per annum 

Shares INSURED in full 
under Massachusetts 
Law 



Unusually attractive architect designed house in 
excellent condition. Large living loom with pine panel- 
led fireplace, dining room, kitchen, screened porch, 
maid's room and bath. Second floor has three bedrooms, tiled bath 
with shower. One bedroom on third floor. Playroom in basement. 
Oil heat. Double garage. Fenced in yard. N'ear schools and 
transportation. $24,000. 

Two-family house near ( enter. First floor has five rooms 
and bath. Second floor, seven rooms and bath. Separate oil heat- 
ers for each apartment. Second floor vacant. $16,500. 



RUTH C. PORTER Realtor \ 

33 THOMPSON STREET j 

Winchester 6-1310 Evenings, Winchester 6-2316 — 6-31 68 { 



i 




I : •■iMfilOl si V 

II!!H[ 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 

Winchester" homIs 
wanted 

Seven loom Dutch Colonial-Customer will pay $14,000. 
New or nearly N'ew seven room Home 2 Hath-. Customer 
will pay $20,000. 

(all 




WINCHESTER 6-0035 

VINE and ELM WOOD AVE. 
WINCHESTER 



FOR SALE 

For someone who wants country living, an attractive six 
room, one story house on outskirts of town. Oil heat. Garage. 

( harming Colonial in convenient neighborhood. Three bed- 
rooms, bath. Garage. $20,000. 

Other new homes in excellent locations. 

FESSENDEN 

KATHRYN P. SULLIVAN, Realtor 
3 Common Street 
Winchester 6-09<4— tj-2770— 6-21 37-R— 6-34,j4— 6-1348 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



F. C. Rivinius&Co. 

INSURANCE 



WEST SIDE 

Exceptionally well-built ami well planned Ranch home. 
Cabinet kitchen, cheerful dining room with bay window, extra 
large living room with picture window and fireplace. Center hall, 
3 twin-size bedrooms, largo closets, tile bath and shower. H. W. 
oil heat. Two-cai attached garage. Large lot of land. Asking: 
$23,500. 

MURRAY & GILLETT, Realtors 

1 Thompson Street 
W Inchester *>-2">60 Eves. Winchester fi.1992. 6-2621, 6-2313 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



1 

19 CHURCH STREET. WINCHESTER 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



VERNON W. JONES 

REAL ESTATE 
Twenty-sixth Year in Winchester 
National Hank Building Winchester 6-0S9S or 6-116.1 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



1 |s State St. 
Hoston, M:i»>. 
I, \ 3-5730 



13 ( hnreh St. - 
Winchester I 
U I 6-326S i 



i 

I 

i VntH- Mi\ iuiii- \\ ild. Broker 
I 




INSURE 
AGAINST FIRS 



Luther W. Puffer, 
Jr., Inc. 

557 Main Street 

Winchester 
Winchester 6-1980 

Join THE MARCH OF 
DIMES 




FOR SALE 



Winchester 2 - family in handy location, 
wo 4-rooni suites, entirely separate, nice yard, 
rice $11,500, cash required for (J. I. $175(1. 

Winchester Duplex house, good, west side 
(cation, a few minutes walk to VVedgemere Station, 
good income. 

Winchester Mystic School district, 7 - room single, - car 
garage. 

G. A. JOSEPHSON - Real Estate - Mortgages 

5 Church Street (Star Building) 
Tel. Winchester 6-2126 Evenings, Winchester 6-1847-M 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



EAST SIDE 

House in perfect condition. Four bedrooms, two baths on 
ond floor. Reduced for Quick Sale £21,00(1 

| WEST SIDE 

mata-tf i Wonderful income property. House in perfect condition. 

~ — — — — — - j \ppioved new OPA Rents. 

Consult Us on Mortgage Money and ail Tvpes of 



JOHN B. MERCURIO 

1 M\ Vernon Street 
Insurance and Real Estate 
T. l. Winchester 6-3400 



i 



i 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



Wednesday Dress Rehearsal and 
Thursday Theater Night Tickets 
are on sale at Filene's from Jan- 
uary 18 - 25 from 10-4. 

Mi. and Mrs. Robert B. Harris 
of West Acton are the parents of a 
daughter. Elizabeth Louise, born 
at the Melrose Hospital on Jan- 
uary 13th. Maternal grandparents 
are Mr. and Mrs. Lewis F. Wells of 
Melrose and the paternal grand- 
parent is Mr. Henry R. Harris of 
Rangeley Ridge. 

For Fuel Oil. Phone Fitzgerald 
Fuel Co., Winchester 6-3000. 

o5-tf 

Tuesday forenoon the Fire De- 
partment was called to put out a 
tire in a Ford dump truck, owned 
by George Nowell and in charge of 
Clyde Mullen of 11 Eaton street. 
The machine was at the corner of 
Highland avenue and Myrtle ter- 
race when rubbish in the body lie- 
came ignited, possibly by hot cig- 
arette ashes from a passing ear. 
Th< tire was of little consequence. 

For experienced service or re- 
pairs on all makes of sewing 
machines or vacuum cleaners, call 
E. W. Clark, Winchester 6- 
0140-W. augl4-tf 

Wesley R. Swanson, son of Mr. 
and Mrs Ralph Swanson, 3 Mar- 
shall road, has been elected treas- 
urer of the Alpha Chapter of Delta 
\u Omega National Fraternity at 
Rurdett College where he is a se- 
nior in the Business Administra- 
tion department. Mr. Swanson is 
also treasurer of the college year- 
book, "The Lion." 

Call Ed Lynch for prompt re- 
moval of rubbish. Winchester 6- 
3510. sl0-tf 

After receiving word that a man 
in a drunken condition had been 
seen at the corner of the Parkway 
and Bacon street shortly after mid- 
night Tuesday morning, Sgt. John 
•I. Dolan and Officer Clarence \htu 
bury picked up a Hoston man, who 
was locked up for safe kcepinir. 
He had apparently been beaten up, 
but had little to say, beyond a re- 
quest to sleep in his cell until after- 
noon. He was then escorted out of 

town. 

Tax Commissioner Henry F. 
Long has assigned a deputy to take 
tax returns at the General Com- 
mittee Room at the town hall on 
February C. from 9:30 a. ni. to 1 
p. m., and from 2 p. m. to 4 p. m. 

dec22-tf 



Mary Von's Candy now for sale 
at Sophie Bowman's Office, 45 
Church street. jal2-tf 

Albert Royden of Beverly, who 
died at Sebring, Fla„ on January 
14, was the brother of Augustus J. 
Royden of Central street. 

Dean W. Carleton, of 15 No. 
Gateway, Winchester, has been ap- 
pointed as a Notary Public, it was 
announced today by Edward J. 
CrOttin, Secretary of the Common- 
wealth. The appointment was 
made by Governor Paul A. Dever 
and was confirmed by his Executive 
Council this week. Secretary 
Cronin signed the commission. 
The term of the Winchester Notary 
Public will expire in 1958. 

Wednesday Dress Rehearsal and 
Thursday Theater Night Tickets 
are on sale at Filene's from Jan- 
uary 1 8 - 25 from 1 o - 4. 

Born to Mr. and Mis. W. Chapin 
Harris (Piiscilla Flagyl of East on, 
Pennsylvania, a daughter, Louise 
Means, horn on January 10th. 
Grandparents are Mr. Richard Har- 
ris of Manchester, New Hampshire 
and Mr. and Mrs. Granville Hamil- 
ton Flagg. 30 Lloyd street, Win- 
chester. 

The music being played by the 
Park Department for skaters at 
Winter Pond doesn't seem to be 
making too much of a hit with resi- 
dents of that district, at least dur- 
ing the evening. The Police have 
received complaints, and have ask- 
ed the attendant at the pond to 
tone down the music, if possible, 

Two Winchester gills will play 
active parts in the over-all plan- 
ning and preparation for the Bos- 
ton V. W. ('. A. World s Fair, to be 
held on February ." at 140 Claren- 
don street. They are: Miss Judith 
Marshall, Hi Kenwin load, and 
Miss Chick Staffiere. 417 Washing- 
ton street, Winchester. 

Saturday morning shortly after 
midnight the Police were notified 
that an automobile was stuck at 
Palmer Beach. Sgt. Edward F. 
Bowler and Patrolman Irving 
Reardon investigated and found 
that a Ford sedan, owned a n d 
driven by a North End youth had 
been temporarily stuck in the mud 
and snow at the beach, but had been 
finally gotten back on the road by- 
its owner and some friends. The 
Police warned the youth to keep 
his car away from the beach during 
the uncertain winter weather. 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 

Wednesday Dress Rehearsal and 
Thursday Theater Night Tickets 
are on sale at Filene's from Jan- 
uary 18 - 25 from 10-4. 
" Mr. Elliott Cameron of Church 
street, former Selectman who has 
been ill at the Winchester Hospital, 
was expected to return home on 
Wednesday. 

Forbes H. "Ted" Noi i is, Jr., son 
of Winchester's Superintendent of 
Schools, has been notified of his 
acceptance as a student at the Har- 
vard Medical School. "Ted," a 
graduate of Harvard, made a bril- 
liant record as a swimmer while at 
Cambridge, has been National Dis- 
tance Champion of the A. A. 1'. 
and recently was chosen by the A. 
A. U. as a member of its all Ameri- 
can team. 

Mr. James N. Clark of Bacon 
street, widely known attorney, is 
reported as quite ill at the Win- 
chester Hospital. 

A collection of the latest 
hats for all occasions at 
Ekman's, 15 Church street, 
tweed hats made. 

Mr. Bradford Eddy of 



RESIDENCE an-t At'TOMORlt.E 
FIRE and LIABILITY 

INSURANCE 

Ilirrrt Local Airfnt — Strong 
Companifs 

W. ALLAN WILDE 

.1 Thompson St. Winchester 6-1400 



NEW OFFICERS AT SECOND 
CHURCH 



S< 
fol 



style 
Miss 
Also 
s8-tf 
Bacon 

street is among several Winchester 
people reported ill at the Winches- 
ter Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis R. Sylves- 
ter announce the birth of a son, 
Francis, Jr.. born on New Year's 
Day, 1951, Mrs. Sylvester is the 
former Ruth Banner of Clinton. 
The paternal grandparents are Mr. 
and Mrs. Ralph P. Sylvester of 
Main street. 

Fred McCormack. proprietor of 
McCormack's Apothecary, is re- 
ported as ill at his home with the 
"flu." 

Civil Service examinations of 
Winchester interest are those for 
Scaler of Weights and Measures on 
March 31, and for Police Officer in 
Winchester on March 10. Last day 
for filing for the Sealer's exam is 
March 1L>. February 19 is the last 
date to tile for the Police exam, and 
any able bodied young men inter- 
ested may get further information 
by talking with Police Chief 
Harrold at Headquarters. 



At the Annual Meeting of the 
cond Congregational Church, the 
Rowing new officers were elected. 
Moderator - John M. Reynolds 
Clerk - Mrs. John Reynolds 
Treasurer - Fred Saunders 
Auditors - Robert Farnham 

Ellen Carlson 
Deacon - George R. Foskitt, Sr. 
Prudential Committee - George 

Richburg 
Music Committee - Arthur Wal- 
lace. Eunice Churchill 
Church School Superintendent - 

Mrs. Rony Snyder 
Church Committee - John Robin- 
son 

Reports of the pastor, treasurer, 
clerk, and heads of the various or- 
ganizations indicate that the year 
1950 was one of the most success- 
ful in the history of the church. 
Membership, average attendance 
and giving have been increased. 
The pal ish is within $2000 of hav- 
ing the new parsonage paid for. 
The people are looking to 1951 to 
bring even more opportunities for 
service. 



WILLIAM S. WOLSEY 

Builder 

Winchester 6-1 



my!2-tf 



A SPEAKER FROM 
"ALCOHOLIC'S ANONYMOUS' 
TO ADDRESS WOMEN'S 
ASSOCIATION 



MIL MORISON (.IVES ADDRESS 



Ii 



BARTLETT ON LEGION 
COUNCIL 



Discussing Problems in the 
termination of Break-Even Point, 
Thomas L. Morison, of i Highland 
Terrace, Assitant to the Pres- 
ident and Secretary of the Cor- 
poration, Bentley School of Ac- 
counting and Finance, addressed 
I ho January meeting of Norwich 
Chapter, National Association of 
Cost Accountants, held at the 
Commerce Club, Norwich, Connec- 
ticut, on January 17. 

Mr. Morison is a past president 
of Boston Chapter. N. A. C, A. and 
a member of the American Ac- 
counting Association, Massachu- 
setts Society of Certified Public 
Accountants, American Institute 
of Accountants, and the Controllers 
Institute of America. 

Mr. Morison is also a past secre- 
tary and Board of Control member 
of the Exchange Club of Metropoli- 
tan Boston. He holds a C. P. A 
Certificate for Massachusetts. 



BIRTHD.U FOOD FESTIVAL 



Formerly CM. Fauci Co. 

Medio**] 

Open 9flMM» W P*?1 



formerly <_M.ro 

139 Mystic Avt 

Pl«irty of Free Parking* Opi 
Free dcli^ry MYttic 6 5IQ7 



MOUftADiAN 
rr 1 jV ji 


ft 1 




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i*oi L 

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jii i 


* I 


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i ii i 



INSTITUTED 

to serve you on all 
your ruga needs 
Call 

Winchester 6-0654 
34 Church Street 



Edward A. Bartlett, Winchester 
High School teacher-coach, has been 
named to the Middlesex County 
Legion Council in charge of direct- 
ing the County Junior Legion base- 
hall activity 

Mr. Bartlett, whose high school 
basketball team is currently lead- 
ing the Middlesex League with a 
perfect record both in league and 
non-league games, has directed and 
coached the Winchester Junior 
Legion baseball team for the past 
two years, producing nines that 
have given excellent accounts of 
themselves with run-of-the-mill 
material, As a member of the Mid- 
dlesex County Council he will have 
an opportunity to assist in pre- 
venting any decline in interest in 
Junior Legion baseball, one of the 
most worth-while of all Legion ac- 
tivities. 

BIRTHDAY SURPRISE 



SECOND CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 



Willis Miller, noted minister and 
entertainer from Lynn will present 
A Night of Magic and Ventrilo- 
quism at the Second Congrega- 
tional Church, Thursday, January 
25, at 8 o'clock. Mr. Miller is not 
only a good minister, he is well 
known in entertainment circles and 
will present a full evening of fun 
for everybody. Tickets may be 
purchased from members of the 
Parsonage Fund-Raiding Commit- 
tee, or at the door. The proceeds 
will go to the Parsonage Fund. 



A Birthday Food Festival, mark- 
ing the anniversary of the remodel- 
ing of the First National Store at 
605 Mam street, Winchester start- 
ed on Thursday, January 18th and 
will continue through Saturday. 
January 20th. 

Booths will be get up throughout 
the store where food demonstra- 
tions will be conducted and samples 
and recipes will be given to shop- 
pers. A giant birthday cake, pre- 
pared by First National bakers, 
will be on display and free slices 
of special cake will be distributed. 

Customers will be given cups of 
Kybo coffee and Joan Carol dough- 
nuts. Special favors will be given 
out as shoppers enter the store. 

A truly holiday spirit will be 
found in First National's birthday 
store. Gay decorations and music 
will lend a carnival atmosphere to 
the celebration. 

The birthday party marks the 
completion of another happy year 
for First National in Winchester 
and combines the promise of 
continued service to the housewives 
of the area. 



EXPANDED 

To give you even 

Better Service 

Our ne». large and efficient 
Rug Cleaning plant for 
Cleaning. Repairing and 
Storing of your rugs. 




MOURADIAN 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



The Main Street Group of the 
C r a w f o l d Memorial Methodist 
Church tendered a surprise birth- 
day party to Mrs. Eva M. Larson, 
at her home, on Monday evening, 
January 15. Mrs. Larson received 
a bouquet of paper money. The 
group spent the evening at a game 
party. 

Among those present were Mes- 
dames Ella Thomas, Alice Mead. 
Anna Harron. Leona Poole. Doris 
< asey, Gladys Casey, Mildred 
Boyle. Thelma Elliott, Marion 
Goodnough, E!va Davis, Ada Wild- 
berger, Lillian Donaghey, May 
Roberts, Esther Anderson, Lottie 
Knowlton, Elsie Nielsen. Grace 
Whitney, Nellie Caswell, Hazel 
Dalton, Elizabeth Roberts, Helen 
Fraser, Marie Stevenson, Maysie 
Rave, Muriel Roberts, Margaret 
McKensie, Charlotte Wilberger, 
Misses Helen Goodnough, Virginia 
Lai son; also Edward Larson. 



The shining sign of welcome 

The opportunity to give generously 

OPERATION PORCHLIGHT 

THE MOTHERS' MARCH 



on 



POLIO 



TURN ON YOUR PORCHLIGHT 
7-8 P. M.. JANUARY 31. 1951 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 

WINCHESTER MARCH OF DIMES COMMITTEE 



SOPHIE BOWMAN 

•15 Church Street 
Winchester 6-2573 — 6-0793 (days) 
Winchester fi-:i27* — 6-1 Iilifi evenings and Sundays 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



Tel. Winchester 6-1271 



Res. Winchester S-3388-W 



FRED'S HOME SERVICE 

\ complete home maintenance service 
for your convenience, 

For your comfort and relaxation, new wallpaper or a soft 
pastel color paint will make a big difference in your home. 

Call us for an estimate 

We do any job around the home — none too large or too small. 



The Women's Association of the 
First Congregational Church of 
Winchester will meet in the Social 
Hall on Tuesday, January 2.1rd, at 
2:00 p. m. Mrs. Clarence R. Wic- 
kerson will preside and Miss Mar- 
garet Copland will conduct the 
worship service. Mrs. Ekdahl, 
Director of Massachusetts Congre- 
gational Woman's Work, will give 
a brief report on the historic "Con- 
stituting Convention of the Nat- 
ional Council of Churches" at 
Cleveland. The program will fea- 
ture a woman speaker from "Alco- 
holics Anonymous." 

What is "Alcoholics Anony- 
mous?" The doctor >ays that the 
alcoholic must have a new person- 
ality. The clergymman says that 
he must have a religious conver- 
sion. "Alcoholics Anonymous" has 
found both these statements to be 
true and has worked out a solution 
that works in more than 60' i of I 
cases. The speaker will explain 
this solution. 

The Social Service Guild will act 
as hostess at the tea which follows 
the meeting. Mis. Walter W. Win- 
ship and Mrs. Robinson S. Whitten . 
will be the pourers. 



D. A. R. 

The January meeting o f the 
Committee of Safety Chapter of the 
D. A. 11. was held in the Ladies' 
Parlor of the First Congregation- 
al Church on Monday afternoon of 
this week. 

After a brief business meeting 
over which the Regent, Mrs. Wil- 
liam W. Goodhue presided. Mrs. 
David D. Nickerson of Maiden and 
Quiney, spoke on the subject 

"There is a Tide ". 

The hostess of the afternoon was 
assisted by: 

Mrs. William Ekltind 
Mrs. William Purdy 
Mrs. Francis P. Carlson 
Mrs. Charles Beaudry 
Mrs. William Denison 
Mis. Frank Howe 
Mrs. Walter Havvkes 



Mrs. Anna Loch man 
Mrs. George Peckham 
Mrs. Edward Sargent 
Mrs. Nathaniel M. Nichols 
Mrs. Donald King Lewis 
Mrs. Edward Newhall 
Pourers: 

Mrs. Charles Yanner 
Mrs. Clifton Hall 



A Classified Ad in the Star 
brings Results. 



See your Eye Physician 
and 

Gmftl Qptiaan 

126 Main St. Tel. WOburn 2-1704 

malS-ti 



WINTON CLUB CABARET 

HERE WE GO AGAIN 

THURSDAY THEATRE NIGHT 

For Tickets at $1.50 Contact 
Mrs. Herbert T. Wadsworth 
WI 6-0005 



or 



Filene's January 18 - 25 from 10 - 4 



Kelley and Hawes Co. 

Established 1877 

Packers and Movers 

-: STORAGE :- 

SEMI-WEEKLY TRIPS 
MAINE, NEW HAMPSHIRE, CONNECTICUT, 
NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA, WASHINGTON. 

MAIN OFFICE 
5 PARK STREET, WINCHESTER 

Winchester 6-1477 

Formerly Winchester 6-0174 

CHAIRS and TABLES 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
BONDED AND INSURED CARRIERS 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

vmcitavM* - ^ * 

MAM 



THE WINCHESTER STAR 



VOL. LXX NO. 23 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 26. 1951 



PRICE TEN CENTS 




OLD LINE FIRM LEAVING 
TOW N 



ttni'on Pell < ompany to Operate 
in Taunton 



Commencing in 
future The Bacon 



MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH RAN! A 

Mr. and Mi<. Joseph Rania, who recently observed their Golden 
Wedding anniversary, are well known residents of 5 Emerson Court. 
They were married in Italy November 16, 1900, and have lived in Win- 
chester for 4X years. Mr. Rania, now retired, has lived for 60 years in 
this town, returning to his native Italy to be married. Tiny have six 
sons, Joseph, J i ., a petty officer in the United States Coast Guard; Frank, 
of Somerville: Thomas of Long Island, \ Y.; Anthony, of Boston ; 
Daniel, and Petei Rania, both of Winchester; and three daughters, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Marioiie of New York City, Mrs. Antoinette Christie of Bos- 
ton and Mrs. Louise l.avello of this town. There are is grandchildren. 



ELLEN M. FITZGERALD 

Ellen M Fitzgerald) passed 
away at her home. IS Oak street on 
Monday, January 22nd. Miss Fitz- 
gerald was 92 years old and was 
horn in Winchester, the daughter 
of the late Nicholas and Marie 
(Onldoni Fitzgerald and attended 
schools here. She was a sister of 
tiie late James J. Fitzgerald, 8 
local leading contractor for many 
years. 

Miss Fitzgerald is survived by 
three nieces, Margaret and Harriet 
Fitzgerald and Mrs. William R. 
Carroll; two nephews. James J. Jr., 
and Selectman Nicholas H. Fitz- 
gerald all of this town. 

Funeral services were held from 
the late residence on Thursday 
morning, January 25, with solemn 
requiem high mass in St. Mary's 
Church at 1' o'clock. Interment 
was in Calvan Cemetery, Woburn, 

BRAHMS' "REQl'IEM" 

On Sunday afternoon, March 11 
at 4 p. m. the Winchester Unitarian 
Choir augmented by a chorus of 
forty or more selected voices of 
some of the best known Winchester 
singers, will present the German 
Requiem of Johannes Brahms in 
the Unitarian church. 

The chorus, under the direction 
of its leader. Mary Ranton Witham, 
is spending a great many extra 
hours in rehearsal in order to pie- 
sent a notable performance. 

The Rev. Robert A. Storer will 
conduct the services. The public 
is invited and all Unitarian Church 
members are asked to bring their 
friends. 

MONDAY LAST DAY TO FILE 
PAPERS 

Nomination papers must be filed 
by Monday, January 29th with the 
Registrar of Voters at the Town 
Hall. 



HENRIETTA PAULINE 
KRONQUIST 

Mrs. Henrietta Pauline Kronquist 
died Wednesday morning, January 
•24th at home. 30 Water street, 
after a long illness. 

Mrs. Kronquist was born 85 years 
ago in Sweden the daughter of An- 
drew and Cecelia Johannson. She 
lived in Winchester for over fifty- 
years in the north end section of 
the town, where she was well re- 
spected by all who knew her. 

Mrs. Kronquist was a widow, her 
husband. Adolph J. Kronquist hav- 
ing died in 1932. She is survived by 
a son, Robert Kronquist of Charles- 
town; five daughters. Miss Jennie 
and Agnes Kronquist of this town, 
Mrs. Stuart Linnell and Mrs. An- 
drew Crawford also of this town, 
and Mrs. Arthur Blodgett of Wo- 
burn. 

Funeral services will be held this 
Friday, at 2:30 p. m. in the Ben- 
net Funeral Home, with the Rev. 
Howard J. Chidley officiating. 

Interment will be in Wildwood 
Cemetery. 



SELECTMEN'S 
JANUARY 



NOTES 

22 



The following were drawn for the 
Jury Pool at Cambridge, to report 
at 9 a. m. March 5th: 

Etiand F. Lawson. 76 Dunster 

Lane 
Harold A. 

street 
Lester R. 



Ratten. 15 Hancock 
Lantern 



Mr. Henry .1 McCrmaek of 
illerica, ami Mr. Fred W. McCor- 
mack of tiiis town with Mr. Alfred 
Pullo of Stoneham attended the 
Massachusetts State Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association mid-winter conven- 
tion held at the Hotel Sheraton in 
Worcester tlli- week. 



Moulton, 4 
Lane ( left town I 
Carlos Anderson, 711 Main street 
Civil Service police entrance ex- 
aminations will be held on March 
lu. February 19 is the last day 
for filing applications. 

Special town meeting Januarv 
29th. 

All articles for the warrant for 
the March Town Meeting must be 
received before 4 :.'{() p. m. on Jan- 
uary 29th. 

A public hearing will be held on 
February 5 at 7s30 p. m. in the 
Selectmen's Room on the petition 
of Vincent G. Carroll for a license 
to sell second-hand motor vehicles 



the immediate 

Felt Company, 
America's oldest felt manufactured 
and certainly one of the oldest busi- 
nesses in Winchester, will leave 
town to make its headquarters in 
Taunton. Samuel S., and Stanley 
N. McN'eilly, present owners of the 
company, have purchased a build- 
ing, formerly owned by the Glen- 

\ i Range Company at 427 West 

Watei street in Taunton, and will 
continue to do business there under 
the same name by which the local 
mill has been known since 1900. 

The company's new building will 
measure 50,000 sq. ft., about twice 
the size of the piesent plant in 
Winchester. All new equipment is 
being installed and the owners hope 
to be in partial operation in Taun- 
ton by the middle of next month. It 
will be slimmer, however, before 
the company is completely operat- 
ing in its new home. The owners 
expect that a number of their 
present personnel will accompany 
the fu in t<> Taunton. 

The Bacon Felt 1 'ompany goes 
back to 1X25 w hen the business was 
founded by Robert Bacon. At that 
time Winchester was a part of Wo- 
burn and known as South Wobuin, 
incorporating as a town in 1850. 
The Macon felt mill has been a land- 
mark at its present location for 
over loo years, the street leading 
to it being formerly known as Mys- 
tic Place and in recent years* as 
drove Place. 

The business was carried on by 
the Baeon family until 1932, pre- 
vious to 1900 as the Charles F. 
Bacon Felt and Wadding Company, 
among other names. At about the 
turn of the century the business 
was incorporated as the Bacon Felt 
< ompany until the McXeilly 
Brothels bought out the Bacon in- 
terests in 1932. Two years later 
Frank Murphy, former automobile 
distributor in Winchester, became 
a member of the company, remain- 
ing in the firm until two years ago 
when he retired because of his 
■ health. . 

The business has grown from the 
old days when between 20 to .Ho 
hands were employed at the mill to 
an average of So hands today. New 
machines have been added with re- 
sulting* new lines, such as sheet 
felts and felt specialties. Former- 
ly the mill made for the most part 
felt polishing wheels. 

MRS. HODGE OBSERVED 90TH 
BIRTHDAY 



Mrs. J. Frank Hodge entertained 
1 informally at her home, 17 Edge- 
hill road, on Wednesday afternoon. 
January 17. from 2 until 5 o'clock, 
upon the occasion of her 90th birth- 
day. 

In good health, despite advanced 
years. Mrs. Hodge thoroughly en- 
joyed greeting those who called to 
extend congratulations and best 
wishes, her guests ranging in age 
from three to 86 years, and includ- 
ing neighbors and friends as well 
as groups from the Fortnightly 
Woman's Club and the Crawford 
Memorial Methodist Church, in 
which Mrs. Hodge has long been 
active. 

Assisting in greeting the guests 
were .Mrs. Hodge's two sons, J. 
Frank Hodge, Jr., of Belmont, and 
George Hodge of Welleslev Hills: 
and her daughter, Miss Mollie 
Hodge, who makes her home with 
her mother. 

Pouring were Mrs. Hodge's 
daughter-in-law, Mrs. J. Frank 
Hodge; a niece, Mrs. Percy L. 
Wetmore of Melrose Highlands; 
Mrs. Edward R. Grosvenor of this 
town and Miss Harriet Holt and 
Miss Margaret Ferger, both of 
Arlington. 

Besides her personal birthdav 
greetings, Mrs. Hodge received 
many cards and other messages of 
congratulation, as well as flowers 
and gifts. She has lived in Win- 
chester since 1913 and enjoys a 
wide circle of friends. 



FIGHT POLIO 

Turn On Your I'orchlight 
7- S I'. M.. Wednesday January 31 

On Wednesday night, January 31, 
1951, from 7 to S p. m., the Win- 
chester March of Dimes campaign 
will come to a dramatic climax 
with the Mothers' JMareh on polio. 
This is the eveninf when over 300 
Winchester mothers will call on 
every home in the community where 
a porchlight is burning to collect 
contributions to the 1951 Infantile 
Paralysis campaign. 

To signify willingness to give to 
this most important cause, one 
merely turns on his porchlight dur- 
ing the hour of 7 to X p.m. and 
shortly a mother will call at the 
door. If a family does not have a 
porchlight, a lantern, a candle in 
a bottle, a small searchlight at- 
tached to a fence, or a colored cloth 
hanging from the doorknob will in- 
dicate your desire to fight polio. 
Everyone who wants to give will 
have the opportunity to give. 

The Mothers' March will be 
heralded Wednesday evening by the 
ringing of chinch bells and the 
blare of a shell nvoni the File Sta- 
tion. Your radinAnd television net- 
works will remiad you with fre- 
quent announcements before the 
zero hour and during the march. 
Through the enthusiastic coopera- 
tion of the local Boy Scout troops 
and Cup packs, 1 flyei containing 
all the facts of the Winchester 
Mothers' March fcill be distributed 
to your door on Saturday, Jan- 
uary 27. 

An event of interest and a help- 
ful reminder for all Winchester 
citizens to give generously to the 
March on Polio will take place over 
WBZ-TV, Channel I at 7 p. m„ 
Wednesday, Januan 31, when Win- 
chester High School's Bill Carle- 
ton, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Carleton, who was stricken with 
polio last year will appear on Bump 
Hadley's 15 minute program. Along 
with Bill will be another athlete 
from Concord, Mass., Paul Leslie. 
Paul was hit hard by polio two 
years ago and has made such a re- 
markable recovery that last fall he 
was an active member of Concord 
High School's crack football team. 
Both Bill and Paul will be Bump 
Hadley's special guests on this pro- 
gram which will be devoted to the 
gallant fight and determination 
these two youngsters have shown 
in defeating the heartbreaking set- 
back infantile paralysis dealt 
them. 

Remember Operation Porchlight, 
The Mothers' March, and all that 
it represent?. Fight polio by turn- 
ing on your porchlight. The hour 
is 7 - 8 p. 111., Wednesday, January 
31. If your light is on and no one 
calls at your door, just go to your 
telephone and call your precinct 
captain. She -o*-;f see that one of 
the marching mothers is directed to 
your door. 
Precinct 1 - 

Mrs. Paul Lamarche - WI fi-0512 
Precinct 2 - 

Mrs. John Doherty - WI 6-2324 

Mrs. Harvey Macaulay - WI 6- 
2816 
Precinct 3 - 

Mrs. Donald Dalrymple - WI 6- 
1547-R 

Mrs. Dean Carleton - WI 6- 

0227-J 
Precinct 4 - 

Mrs. Irving Tourtellot - WI 6- 

2097- R 

Mrs. Richard Bateman - WI 6- 
2610 

Mrs. John Gibbons - WI 6-0243 
Mrs. Ronald Davis - WI 6-0940 
Precinct 5 - 

Mrs. Charles Jellisoti - WI 6- 
0247- J 

Mrs. Michael Donlon - WI •'.-237:1 
Precinct 6 - 

Mrs. William Abbott . WI 6- 
0024 -R 



HEINZ — GAY 



WEST GETS SILVER ST \ R 



COMING EVENTS 



There is Winchester interest in 
the marriage which took place in 
Cohasset on Friday evening, Jan- 
uary 19, when Miss Beverly Gay, 
daughter of Mr. ami Mrs. Reginald 
H. Gay of 55 Bancroft load. Cohas- 
set, formerly of Highland avenue, 
became the bride of Kenneth 
Eugene Heinz, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ludwig F. Heinz of ( enter street, 
Dertnisport, formerly of Concord. 
The Rev. Gaston Carrier, minister 
of the Unitarian Church in Cohas- 
set, performed the 7 o'clock cere- 
mony. 

Given in marriage by her father, 
Miss Gay wore an informal gown 
of teal crepe with a gardenia cor- 
sage. She was attended by Miss 
Sally Morgan of Winchester who 
wore a street-length diess of navy 
blue. Paul Deniillc of Concord was 
best man for Mr. Heinz. 

Only members of the immediate 
families attended the marriage and 
the informal reception, both o f 
which took place at the home of the 
bride's parents. Among those pres- 
ent were the parents of both the 
bride and bridegroom; the bride's 
grandmother, Mrs. Allan C. Pres- 
cott of Cohasset; Mr. and Mrs. Ken- 
ning Hanson of Whitman, uncle 
and aunt of the bride; and two 
brothers-in-law and sisters of the 
bride, Mr. and Mis. Francis Lam- 
biase of North Woburn and Mi 
and Mrs. William Martens ,,f Han- 
cock Village. 

The bride, a graduate of Win- 
chestei High School in the class of 
1949. is in the employ of Colonial 
Associates, Inc.. of Roston. Mi 

Heinz graduated from Concord 
High School and attended Tufts 
College. A specialist in electronics, 
he was in the employ of the Gener- 
al Heat and Power Company when 
he was called into the A lined Ser- 
vice, the suddenness of his call ac- 
counting for the hasty and informal 
man iagfe ceremony. 

The bride and groom first met 
when both were serving as life- 
guards at Walden Pond during the 
summer of 1949. 

91 LAST SUNDAY 

Mrs, Clarence M. Mixer of Mir- 
ror Lake. X. 1L, and Mrs. Prescott 
F. Wild of 40 Everett avenue gave 
a sin prise birthday party on Sun- 
day afternoon, January 21, for 
their mother, Mrs. Frank W. Mar- 
den, at her home, 41 Foxcroft road. 
Miss Marion Doe. Mrs. Maiden's 
housekeeper, assisted with the ar- 
rangements, and several of Mrs. 
Maiden's eight grandchildren were 
present. 

Many flowers, including hand- 
some red roses and violets, made an 
attractive background for the 
party, during which tea was served 
and a handsomely decorated birth- 
day cake was cut by Mrs. Maiden's 
granddaughter, Mrs. Helen Hodges 
MacLean of Reading. 

Birthday messages were received 
by phone from Mrs. Maiden's 
grandson, Lt. Col. Burgess II. 
Bodges, who is on Army duty in 
Montana; from her son-in-law, Mr. 
Prescott Wilde, on business in Hali- 
fax, N*. S. ; from another son-in-law, 
Mr. Clarence Mixer, in Wolfeboro, 
N. H ; and from Mrs. Maiden's 
brother, Mr. Rufus Prince Ayer, in 
Bangor, Maine. 

Mrs. Maiden was born January 
21, 1857, in Freedom, Maine. She 
has many friends in Winchester, in 
which town she has made her home 
for 25 years. 

MISS BUNTEN ENGAGED 



MISS MOONEY 
MR. VVHELAN ENGAGED 



NURSES AIDES NEEDED 

I he \\ iiielie-ter Red Cross Chapter is making an urgent 
appeal for Nun.es' Vide* this month. Not onh are new 
applicant- needed for training, but also there is a special 
need lor inactive \nle- to return to -.nice. More nurses 
are leaving for tin- \ruicil Services. The new Winchester 
Hospital wing will place new demands on the nursing -tall. 
If you can help, call \\ Inchester (>-L\i(Ml. 



Mr. and Mrs. John J. Mooney of 
U eymouth announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Marjorie. 
to Mi. Charles E. Whelan, son of 
Mrs. Mary Whelan of Winchester 
place. 

Miss Mo,. ney is a graduate of 
Bridgewater State Teachers' Col- 
lege and has ,-tudied at the Grad- 
uate School of Boston University. 
Mr. Whelan served with the United 
States Navy in the Pacific Area 
during World War II. 



ENGAGEMENT ANNO U N C ED 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis N. Millett 
of Chappaqua, New York announce 
the engagement of their daughter 
Joan to Mr. David Pope, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Eric Pope of Watertown, 
Conn. 

Both Joan and David are attend- 
ing Colby College. 

The wedding will take place in 
March. 

ENGAGED 

Mr, anil Mis. Charles C. Capone 
of 37 Irving street announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Joan Mane to Mr. Owen T. Mac- 
Isaac, son of Mr. and Mrs, Joseph 
B. Maclsaac of Maiden. 

Miss Capone is a graduate of 
Winchester High School, class of 
1950; Mr. Maclsaac is a sergeant 
in the USAF. 



Mrs. Alger Trull Bunten of 
Wildwood street announces the en- 
gagement of her daughter Jean, to 
Charles Francis Kirby, Jr., son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Francis Kirby 
of Watertown. 

Miss Bunten graduated from 
Kents Hill School and studied 
music at the New England Conser- 
vatory of Music. 

Mr. Kirby spent four years with 
the United States Marine Corps 
and graduated from the University 
of California in Los Angeles. He 
is now associated with the Ray 
Industries branch in Los Angeles, 

No immediate date lias been set 
for the wedding. 



WAS FORMER RESIDENT 



Subscribe To The STAR 

Still $2 50 a Year 

Quite a Saving over the New 
Single Copy Price of tOc. 

We deliver free! Save yourself money 
and the possibility of missing the copy 
v*ou want most. 

WRITE - PHONE — DROP IN 

THE WINCHESTER STAR 

3 Church Street Tel. W Inchesler 6-0029 



NOMINATION 
PAPERS 




Nomination Papers for the 
nomination of candidates in- 
cluding Town Meeting mem- 
ber*, to be \oted for on 
March ,i. 1951. must be sub- 
mitted to the registrars of 
Voters for certification of 
signatures on same on or be- 
fore 5 o'clock on the after- 
noon of January 29. 1951. 

Howard S. ( osiirove 
George J. Barbaro 
Harr> J. Donovan 

Mabel W. Stin.-on 
Registrars of Voters 

janlJ- t 



HORN 

To Mi. and Mrs. Frederick R. 
Bates a second daughter, Deborah 
Reed, in Levittown, Long Island on 
Fnday, January 12th. 

Grandparent; are Mr. and Mrs. 
Harold Rates of 7 Lewis road and 
Mrs. Charles Clifford Miller of 
Cooperstown, N. V. 



Mrs. Alice H. Davis who died 
last week in Francestown. N. II.. 
was for many years a resident of 
this town living on Everett ave- 
nue. She is survived by a stepson, 
E. Linwood Davis. Funeral services 
were held on Saturday afternoon at 
the Congregational Church in 
Greenfield, N. H. and cremation 
took place at Mt. Auburn on Mon- 
day of this week. 



W If. S. AT LEXINGTON 
TONIGHT 

Winchestei High travels to Lex- 
ington High tonight to meet the 
M mute men in an important Mid- 
dlesex League encounter. 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

You Can SURVIVE 

You can live through an atom bomb raid and you won't have 
tu have a Geiger counter, protective clothing, or special training in 
order to do it. The secrets of survival are: 

KNOW THE BOMB'S TRUE DANGERS. 
KNOW THE STEPS YOU CAN TAKE TO ESCAPE THEM 

You are urged to read carefully "SURVIVAL UNDER 
ATOMIC ATTACK" the official United States Government book- 
let, copy of which will be delivered to every home in Winchester on 
Saturday. January 27. Distribution will be made by the Boy- 
Scouts. If you do not receive yours, copies will be available at the 
Department of Civil Defense, Town Hall, Telephone Winchester 
6-3257. 

James W. Black'nam 
Director of Civil Defease 



Winchester Officer Receives 
Award for Gallantry 

The Silver Star Medal, America's 
third highest decoration for gal- 
lantry in action, has been awarded 
a Winchester officer of the 1st Cav- 
alry Division in Korea. 

("apt. William I. West, son of Mi. 
and Mis. John D. West of 74 
Wedgomeio avenue, former Win- 
chester High, and West Point foot- 
ball star, received the award F01 
gallantry in action against the 
enemy on September '">, 1950, neai 
Taetru. Korea. He is aide de camp 
to tin' 1st Cavalry Division's com- 
manding general, Major General 
Hobart R. Cay. 

An account of the action in which 
he earned the medal is contained 
in a citation accompanying ('apt. 
West's award. It tells that while 
the captain was visiting the com- 
mand post of a company preparing 
for an attack to open the main 
supply route, he volunteered to ac- 
company a platoon that was short 
of officers. 

During the attack this platoon 
was subjected to a heavy volume of 
enemy mortar and small arms tire 
that threatened to halt the attack. 

According to the citation: 

"('apt. West, realizing the need 
lor immediate action, fearlessly 
mounted a friendly tank and man- 
ning the .511 caliber machine gun, 
indicated targets to others in the 
attack. 

"His aggressive and courageous 
actions under intense enemy tire," 
the citation further state's, "in- 
spired others to continue in the 
successful accomplishment of the 
assignment, ( apt. West's gallan- 
try and selfless devotion to duty 
reflect great credit upon himself 
and the military service." 

MISS ORDWAY ENGAGED TO 
MIC PRIEST 

Mr. and Mrs. Richmond Ordway 
of 95 High street announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Ann. 
to Mr. Emei son ' . Priest, Jr., son 
of Dr. and Mrs. Fmerson C. Priest 
of 15 Euclid avenue. 

Miss Ordway and Mr. Priest 
were both graduated from Win- 
chester High School, Miss Ordway 
in the class of 1950 and her fiance 
a year earlier. Mr. Priest is pres- 
ently attending Roston University 
but plans to entei the Armed Ser- 
vices during February. 

SC HOOL INFORMATION 
PAMPHLETS IN MAIL 

The High School and Enlarged 
Junior High School Building Com- 
mittee are mailing to every house- 
hold, before the Special Town Meet- 
ing on January 29, a pamphlet con- 
taining larger scale floor plans 
for both the proposed 2 year junior 
high school and the proposed 4 year 
senior high School, 

Attached to these plans are per- 
tinent facts concerning the build- 
ing program, which should be of in- 
terest to everyone. 

MISS DRESSER SOLO 
PERFORMER 

Miss Suzanne Dresser. *:) Cain- 
bridge street, was a solo performer 
last Saturday afternoon at the 
Belmont PTA Playhouse ballet pro. 
gram for school children. Miss 
Dresser was cast as Mistress Mary 
in the Mother Goose episode as 
produced by Mary Corhett Burns of 
Arlington. The program will be 
repeated for The Arlington Friends 
of The Drama on Sunday after- 
noon. February -1. 



January Ki 
n Club Cabaret. T. 

M. i 



rtnightly, Krti 
ins. at the hom 
Wcdtr* 

11 f.. 11. 



Saturday - Win- 
tta 1. !> :(>•! p. m. 

lay, in a. m. - The 
ton Contmittrv Pro- 
iunw of Mrs Chat Us Mason. 

Avenue. Coffee and s.h-u! 
by a stu-uker 
Jamiars -"■ Monday, I :S0 p. nc - College 
Club, Mistoiy Croup Hostess. Mrs. Isaiah 
Huilnrd. ,*. Pun- Street. 

.hitman Monday, 7:45 p. m. - Town 
It:. :; Special To» n Meeting. 

.laiiuary Ttiesdav, 7 ::Srt p. m. to 11 
p in. - Badminton in the High School 
KvmnuMum for Winchester a. I- Its. 

January :ui, Tuesday. 7 ;4a p. m. - At 
'ii. hw Congregational Church Mrs. Ray 
K. Brown will present a food demonstra- 
tion at the Jr. Mrs. i:,,i!d meeting: 

hebruary 1. Thursday, 7 : :a> p. m. to 11 
p m. - Badminton »i the High School 
gymnasium for Win.-hester adults 

February 1. -'. s. Thursday. Friday and 
Sac i. lay - Parish Players present 
"Thunder Rock" in the Little Theati. 
Beneath a Spue. First Congregational 
Church. *;:!n p. m. Thursday performance 
benefits Friends of Winchester Hospital, 
tickets reserved from Mrs. Bruce Young 
WI K-:WS5, Mr-. Donald Bircha I. W'l fi, 
1 ■'■ I'-J Tickets for Friday an. I Saturday, 
Mr-. ,1. Waldo Bund WI 6-uS.">fi. Seats 
-'Mil. J1.4M, las included. 

February !. Saturday, p. m. - Win- 

rhester Historical Society Winchester Li- 
brary Art Doom. Lecture in Color Motion 
film. New Kllgiiind Historic mi. I 

Scenic" by Umrence 1.. Barber 

Febrnarv 3, Saturday, 2:80 p m - 
Winchester Historical Society, winter me, i. 
ing in Art Caller's - , Public Lihrary. Spe:.^- 
er, l{<-\ . Laurence I. Rarher of Arlington, 
with film-, on historical New Knglan I. 

Febrimr-S '•. Mon.hn .' no p m . - Win- 
chester Public I. it. i an The Fortnightly 
Literature Groin II,... k Review, by Miss 
to Ctruiie Kimball 

February ." Monday s.Wi p. hi, - Win- 
chester High S.'hool Auditorium. Panel di- 
cussion "A olesceni'e: which Way to Ma- 
turity F..r ;.!! parents, sponsored by 
Junior High Associates. 

February '■. Tuesday - Wednesday 
Night Club, Firs! Congregational Church, 
"Country Ounce an. I Sugar-Fat." 

February ;». Friday. 11 O't a. m. - Art 
Study Croup, Winchester College Club at 
Fogg Museum. Quincy Street. Cambridge. 
Special program, inel .ling Frener, ' aw- 

itvgs and wtitei m. Optional tours in 

afternoon. 

March HI. Sal rday. 8:30 p. m. - Bow- 
Join College Med lebompstrt . Met calf 
Hall. CnilMfian ("hutch, Unitarian Couples' 
Club. 

T \.\ PROJECTION FOR 
SF( ONDARY SCHOOL 
BVILDIXfi PROGRAM 



1st 


year 




2nd 


year 


$144 


:!rd 


year 


S2.4 1 


4 th 


year 


s-2.:is 


5th 


year 


$2,85 


6th 


year 


$2.31 


7th 


year 




8th 


year 


$2.25 


9th 


year 


$2.21 


Kith 


year 


S2.1K 


11th 


year 


$1.76 


12th 


year 


$1.7:5 


13th 


year 


SI. 71 


Mill 


year 


$l.fi8 


15th 


year 


$\M 


null 


year 


$1.62 


17th 


year 


$1.60 


18th 


year 


$1.57 


1 9th 


year 


$1.54 


20th 


year 


$1.52 



ary slightly from 
in the Building; 

i t and due to sub- 
of the Finance 
$50,000 less i.e 



Above figur 
those appearing 
Committee's repe 
sequent request 
Committee that 

taken front K. and D. account to 
finance the program. 

For The High School and Enlarged 
.Junior Hitrh School Building Com- 
mittee 

Rachel T. Kimball. Chairman 



WRITES FOR MAGAZINE 

Miss Marian K. Phipps. reading 
consultant for the public schools of 
Winchester, is represented in the 
January issue of "The Instructor,'' 
nationally circulated magazine for 
elementary teachers. Miss Phipps 
is the author of an article, entitled 
"Your Reading Program," in which 
s h e describes some successful 
methods for the teacher. 



THE STAR FAMILY 
GROWS LARGER 



Avenue, ( olunihus, Ohio 
Dayton, Ohio 



New Subscribers for January 

★ * 

Beverly Gaj Hem/, '<:> Bancroft Road. Cohassel 
Sj;t. James F. \ iolante, (,recn\ille, S. (.'. 
Mrs. Mice (.. Miller. 326 Main Street 
Kd»ard F. O'Rourke, Fort Fustis, Va. 
S. Frederick Calhoun, 33 Di\ Street 
Mr-. Wilfred I.. McKenzie. 20 Ardlev Place 
Mrs. Mabel \. Home. 9 Prospect Street 
(.lenda Rolfe. V F. Sanitarium Hospital. Melrose 
Mrs. I'rancis J. Mardulier, )7 \\ ood«ide Road 
Dr. William Buckley, 3 Pine Street 
John S. Merritt. 102 Wildwood Street 
Mis,-. Virginia Dudley. I Maxwell Road 
Mr. Frank Procopio. 65 Holland Street 
Mr. J. H. Met. ill. 1^ (irove Street 
Mr. John P. dleason. 29.' Si». ( hampion 
( apt. (.eor«e S. W y man. Wright Field, 
James Casey, Is Ru>-,ell Road 
Mr. Charles \. Hart. Jr.. Vermont U'ademy, Saxton Riser. \t. 
Kendall Wright, Thomas Drive, Wilmington, Del. 
Robert F. Wilson, ( amp Rucker, Vlabama 
Guj P. Livingstone, 12 < hestnut Street 
Mr-. J. W. Taylor, 211 Forest Street 
Mr>. Jamts Loftus, 61 Woodside Road 
M. W. Busse>. 10 Allen Road 
Ruth F. Palace, M Myrtle Street 
Mrs. Katherine Todes,ca. 15 Tremont Street 
J. E. Herlihv. 17 Hillside Asenue 
H. H. Do\er. 15 Vine Street 
Mr. Bernard F. Stygles, 11 Webster Street 
Harry P. Hood, 2 Glen Road 

Robert W. Larrabee. Eastland Hotel, Portland, Maine 
N. A. Sargent, 38 Pierrepont Road 
( apt. (,. V. Graves, 19 Oxford Street 

Mis,> Susan (.raves. University of Vermont. Burlington, Vermont 
Robert W. Stevenson. 32 Hemingway Street 
Everett A. Smith. 31 Winthrop Street 
Richard P. Nsquist, 29 (.ray -on Road 
Department of Ci\il Defense. Town Hall 

Mrs. Warren C. Hall. 1003 So. 34th Street. Lincoln, Nebraska 

Michael D. Kaknes. 16 Pierrepont Road 

Mrs. Richard Page. Is Samoset Road 

Mrs. Richard Keppler. 12 Fells Koad 

Mr. Vincent F. Frhard. 191 Washington Street 

Frank L. Johnson, 30 Prince Avenue 

Je--,ie Guhtin. 375 Cambridge Street 

Mrs. Michael Procopio, 76 Irving Street 

Mr-. James H. Noonan. 27 Sheridan Circle 



<> 



♦ 



2 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 1951 




ill 



A MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK 

MORTGAGES 

WE HAVE A PLAN TO SUIT EVERYONE 
WITH OR WITHOUT PRINCIPAL PAYMENTS 
AT REASONABLE INTEREST RATES 

UP TO TWENTY YEARS TO PAY 
G. I. — CONSTRUCTION — DIRECT REDUCTION 

SEE US IF YOU ARK PLANNING TO 
Ml ILD — BUY OR REFINANCE 
YOUR PRESENT MORTGAGE 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 

Telephone Winchester 6-2130 

Winchester Savings Bank 



26 MT. VERNON ST. 



MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 8 A M 10 7 P M. 7 




WIN CHESTER, MASS 

NOT OPEN SATURDAYS 



j INCORPORATED I8>H f^^E^^??^ 



W IN< 'HESTER BOY SCOUTS 
WINCHESTER ( I B SCOUTS 
N KWS 

During thi> week of February 5 - 
1 1 the Hoy Scouts of America Will 
celebrate their list birthday. Al- 
though various activities arc sched- 
uled for the entire week, the high- 
light will occur on February 8, Boy 
Scout Day, when various Scouts 
will assume the town offices and 
take over the duties of tlx- vavt- 
OUS officials and employees. Th"' 
evening all the Scouts in town will 
participate in a Town Meeting at 
which time four items of impor- 
tance not only to the Scouts but to 
the town as a whole will be pre- 
sented, discussed, debated, and 
voted upon. This 'birthday celebra- 
tion' will not only be very interest- 
ing and educational for the boys, 
but will give the townspeople an 
opportunity to see the Scouts in ac- 
tion. Final details of the program 
are being worked out and the whole 
story will b e presented in this 
column next week. 

Saturday, January 27, the Scouts 
and Cubs of Winchester will effect 
the distribution to every house in 
town of two pamphlets, a flyer 
discussing the work and needs of 
the Polio drive, and a second book- 
let on protection from the Atom 
bomb, 

("uli Pack N'o. recently had a 
drive to collect waste paper which 
was very successful. 

The Cubs culled most of Precinct 
'■'< and collected over 8 tons of paper. 

Cub Pack No. fl has challenged 
Pack No. 7 to a ski meet. The 
challenge has been accepted. 

The meet will probably be held 
on Horn Pond Mountain and will 
consist of four events: downhill, 
slalom, cross-country, and jumping. 
The date has yet to be determined 
and no doubt depends on the good 
graces of the weather-man. Prizes 
will be awarded for the various 



events and the meet will be con- 
cluded with refreshments. 

Troop No. 3 engaged recently in 
a weekend hike to Camp Lane. Five 
of the older and more experienced 
boys laughted off a forecasted 
blizzard, packed all their food, 
equipment, and necessaries the 7 
miles to Burlington, and despite in- 
tense cold and wet ground had a 
very enjoyable and instructive 
weekend. Two days of camping and 
two nights on the cold damp ground 
provided a lot of experience for the 
boys and they returned in time for 
Sunday dinner tired and a little 
frayed at the edges, but with a 
deeper insight into the know - how 
of camping and with the memories 
of an enjoyable weekend. The boys 
participating were Senior Patrol 
Leader Dick Lowry and Patrol 
Leaders Bob Gaffney, Bob 
Crockett, Dick Gaffney and Bill 
Johnston. 

Troop No. 12 has been very ac- 
tive during the past few weeks. 
They sold Christmas wreaths in 
December to enrich the troop treas- 
ury toward camping equipment. 
During the week of the paper drive 
they gave the parishioners of St. 
Mary's a real insight as to the en- 
deavor of the Troop to earn the it- 
own 'keep' so to speak. Trying to 
be self-supporting and making only 
small demands on the CYO treas- 
ury seems uppermost in the mind 
of the Troop. Another drive will 
be held in the Spring. 

The Ad Altaic Dei award for 
Reverence will be awarded in Feb- 
ruary at the Cathedral in Boston 
by His Excellency Richard .1 
dishing, Archbishop of Boston in 
a colorful ceremony. Scout Thomas 
Morrissey is scheduled to receive 
this award from Winchester. 

Troop 12 Scouts and Scouters will 
act as ushers in the forthcoming 
< Y(> Minstrel Show. 




DeMOLAY TO BE GUESTS OF 
BOSTON MASONS 



jjWj 

i el Mr S 




MOFFETT 
FUNERAL SERVICE 

M. G. MOFFETT 
Reg. Funeral Director and 
Embalmer 

177 Washington Stmt. Winchester 

Tel. Winchester O-1730 

malS-tf 



Winchester's Mt. Vernon Chap- 
ter, Order of DeMolay, has been 
invited by Fourth Kstate Lodge, 
A. F. and A. M. of Boston to exem- 
plify the DeMolay Degree Mondas 
evening. February 5, at S o'clock 
at the Masonic Temple, Boylston 
street, Boston. 

Stanley Fudge and Leo Booda- 
kian, Advisors of Mt. Vernon Chap- 
ter, will accompany the boys who 
are invited to attend dinner as 
guests of Fourth Estate Lodge 
The Chaplain of the Charlestown 
State Prison will be the speaker of 
the evening and will address hi- 
remarks primarily to the boys. 

Fourth Kstate Lodge is com 
posed by and large of Boston news- 
papermen. 



Mr. and Mrs. Earle F. Spencer of 
Yale street left yesterday for New 
Y'ork where they will be registered 
through the week-end at the Ritz- 
Carlton. 





PLAYERS TO PRESENT 
THUNDER HOCK 

On Thursday, Friday and Satur- 
day evenings, February 1, 2 and 3, 
the Parish Players will present 
"Thunder Rock" in the Little 
Theatre Beneath a Spire, First Con- 
gregational Church, as the second 
play in their Silver Anniversary 
year. The Thursday evening per- 
j formance has been turned over to 
' the Friends of the Winchester Hos- 
pital, with Mrs. Bruce W. Young 
and Mrs. Donald I.. Birchall in 
charge of tickets. 

Mrs. William Bruce Lunsford is 
chairman of production, with Mrs. 
Florence Grant in charge of make- 
i u p; Mrs. Robert P. Blake, 
prompter; Mrs. George E. Connor, 
program and publicity; Miss Ruth 
Albee, properties, with Margaret 
Hodgson, Barbara Vincent, Ruth 
Nelson, and Mary Jane Hooper; 
costumes, Mrs. George H. Gowdy, 
Mrs. John Bicker, Mrs. Richard 
Mergendahl, Mrs. George E. Con- 
nor. 

The unusual setting of the light- 
house interior will be designed and 
built by the stage crew, Raymond 
J. Carter, chairman, with George 
H. Gowdy, Robert Sibley, Otis 
Jason, Seymour Russell, John 
Ricker, Mrs. Bradford M. Bentley, 
Robert Lowrey, Richard Gould, and 
Donald Goss. The hall will be dec- 
orated for this Silver Anniversary 
Play, in appropriate theme, by Mrs. 
Ray Brown, Mrs. Robert Millican. 
Miss Suzanne Gleason, and Mr. 
Robinson S. Whitten. 

"Thunder Rock," a thought-pro- 
voking play by Robert Ardrey that 
echoes the feeling and tension of 
our present time, is being given by 
(the Parish Players at this time 
' as part of "International Theatre 
Month," recommended by the 
Panel on Dramatic Arts, U. S. Na- 
tional Commission for UNESCO. 
The setting and several scenes will 
1 be photographed b y the Parish 
Players and sent to the Panel, to 
show Winchester's willingness to 
participate in International Theatre 
Month. 

Pourers, ushers and hostesses 
and the sale of tickets for the 
Thursday performance will be un- 
der the chairmanship of the Friends 
of the Winchester Hospital, 

Mrs. Howard J. Chidley and Mr. 
and Mrs. R. Ashley Lewis are in 
charge of pourers, hostesses and 
ushers for Friday and Saturday 
evenings, and they will be as fol- 
lows: pourers on Friday, Mrs. Rich- 
ard K. Gould. Mrs. E. Ober Pride. 
Mrs. John B. Wills, Mrs. Erskine 
N. White; hostesses and ushers, 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. White, Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Wood Reynolds, 
Mr. and Mrs. D. Reid Weedon, Jr., 
Mrs. William H. Gustin, Mr. Rich- 
ard K. Gould on Saturday, pourers 
will be Mrs. Herbert E. Bixler, 
Mrs. Chester T. Bliss, Mrs. Aram 
Johnian, Mrs. David W. Morse; 
hostesses and ushers, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ormond M. Hessler, Miss Jean 
Ban, Mr. and Mrs. Bradford M. 
Bentley, Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. 
Blake. Mrs. Walter F. Hodges. 
Mrs. Richard T. Bliss, Mr. Robert 
H. Sibley. Jr. 



r§ai<illc 

FUNERAL SERVICE 

418 MASS AVE. ARLINGTON 
C«l. ARtihCTON 5 - It? 34 

. ««<X>»S Javil.C »o«M»» WU«<*MM> 



Bruno Mulea and Patrick J. F. 
Walsh, members of the Winches- 
ter Post of the American Legion, 
are now at the Soldiers' Home, 
Chelsea, Mass. 



Kimball 

FUNERAL SERVICE 

39 Church Street 
Winchester 

Winchester 6-0200 




John W. Lane. Jr. 
— Director — . 

760 Main Street, Winchester 
Winchester 6-25S0 




LOCAL and DISTANT 

NON- SECTARIAN 
• 

Price Range to Serve Al 
Information Upon Btqw— I 

OFFICES A CHAPELS 
CENTRALLY LOCATED 

Waterman 



Vitiifad Soum- Must be Listed * 
en your 1950 INCOME TAX RETURN 




1950 Income Tax returns 
require listing of each cor- 
poration from which you 
receive dividends and their addresses. 
This compilation of leading corporations 
and addresses is available without charge simply by writing, 
phoning or stopping in at our office. 



AjQALCSlN & CO. 

Members of 

New York Slock Exchange Midwett Srock Exchange 

New York Curb Exchange (Aaaociate) 

MM RICE C. MRU. Registered Representative 
30 Federal Street. Boston, Mass. 
Telephone: H Vncock 6- 12.10 
Chicago New York Boston 



JR. MRS. GUILD 



The Jr. Mrs. 
Congregational 
chestcr will me< 
ing, January 30, 



Guild of the First 
Church in Win- 
it mi Tuesday even- 
at 7:45 p. m. in the 



Kindergarten Room to see Mr 
Ray E. Brown of Winchester Rive 
one of her well known and informa- 
tive demonstrations. Mrs. 
Brown, a home economist, will be 
remembered for similar and very 
popular programs she gave before 
groups in our church during the last 
war. At that time she was con- 
nected with Lever Brothers and the 
Borden Company as a food consul- 
tant, concerning herself with food 
problems and cooking methods 
peculiar to wartime restrictions 
and shortages. Following the war 
she lived in Honolulu where she 
was associated with the University 
of Hawaii for three years as home 
economist. She has recently re- 
turned to Winchester to live. 

Mrs. Brown will speak on 
"What's New in^Food" doing the 
actual preparation and cooking of 



all recipes which she presents. At 
the end of the program there will 
be an opportunity to sample the 
food, and coffee will be served. 

The program is in charge of Mrs. 
Lawrence Pexton, and the social 
committee consists of Mrs. Otis 
Jason, chairman, assisted by Mrs. 
William M. Burroughs and Mrs. 
Clifford M. Hammill. 



D. 



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SAFETY CHAPTER 



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Philco Refrigerators AT NEW 
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RADIO AND TELEVISION SERVICE 
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Serving Winchester for Over 17 Years 




Committee of Safety Chapter 
Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion at their meeting January nine- 
teen at the First Congregational 
Church elected the following Dele- 
gates and Alternates to attend the 
60th Continental Congress in 
Washington the week of April 15 
through April 20. 

Delegates: Mrs. William W. 
Goodhue, Mrs. Nathaniel M. 
Nichols. 

A|ternates: Mrs. William C. 
Cusack, Mrs. Earle E. Andrews. 



Cummings the Florist 



18 Thompson Street 



Tel. WI 6-1077 



FLOWERS 



MAURICE O. REEBENACKER 

I lie good Natttred Vurtioiieer appraiser and expert 
attic Inspector from KKading J-l*>'»| i< paying hi-ih 

prices for Antiques, hand painted china, oriental nigs, 
marble top furniture, old Singers, art objects and Bric-a- 
Brae. rail or write Reehenaekei. .11 Temple Street. 

REading 2-1991 



A Full Line of Cut Flowers and Plants 



MIRRORS 

Modern unframed mirrors in all shapes. Large mirrors that 
cover the entire space over your fireplace mantel. Colonial and 
other period designs. 

Malcolm G. Stevens 

78 Summer Street ARlington 5-4112 j 

(Cor. Mill Street — - IS'ear Arlington Center) j 

— o_„ ■— „ , i 



Winchester 
Cleaning Service 



MIKE PENTA, Proprietor 



Winchester 6-051 3-J 



Homes - Offices - Stores 

WE (LEAN 

Windows, walls, floors. Venetian blinds, rugs, cellars, and at- 
tics. Windows repaired, glass set; screen and storm window 
service. Gardens, lawns, etc.. cared for. Rubbish removal. 
1 loors shellaced and waxed. 



'lend me a ham 


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632 Main St. Winchester, Mass. 

TEL Winchester 6-3133 





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ELECTRIC WATER PUMP AT YOUR SERVICE 

FRANK REEG0 

- CONTRACTOR - 

Landscape Gardener and General Trucking. Asphalt Drive- 
ways. Roads. Equipped with 3-ton roller. Owned and Operated 
GRADING — DRIVEWAYS — DRY WELLS 
LOAM. SAND. GRAVEL, CRUSHED STONE FOR SALE 

All Men Insured 

Til. Winchester 6-2412 or Winchester 6-0098- W 

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FOR YOUR 

RUGS & CARPETS 



No time like the present to try our thorough cleaning 
service and give new epring to rug fibres — lustrous beauty 
and years of extra life to precious floor coverings. Our 
cleaning is the result of years of experience with both Orien- 
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Winchester 6-2213 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY. JANUARY 26. 1951 



3 



WIN TON < LI B PARTIES 



"Here We Go Again" for the 
Winton Club's 30th annual Cabaret 
in the Town Hall, starting at I' 
o'clock to-night, and again to- 
morrow night. The Cast ha.-! worked 
long and hard under the able lead- 
ership of Mr.-. Charles W. Butler, 
the Cabaret chairman and the coach 
.Mj. R ■ haid R. Rector. 

r to 1 



There are V 
gatherings be 
mantes. A !.. 
people who mt 
Yi .day night a 



- many gala 
•e both perfo'r- 
group of young 
ning together on 
Messrs. and Mes- 



damea David Burnham, Scott Par- 
rot, David Ritchie, Robert Wild, 
John Muynard. Harold Lewis, Wil- 
liam Moseley, William Abbott, 
Richard Chase, Richard 'anus, 
Peter Lahan, John Sulmonetti, 
Robert Wight, Douglas Graham, 
and Professor and Mrs. Leonard 
M<ad all of Winchester; also Mr. 
and Mrs. William Phillips of Lex- 
ington, Mr. and Mis. Kartell Rup- 
pe.it of Maiden, Mr. and Mrs. Gar- 
dner Junes of Cambridge, Mr. 
Wendell Irving of Boston, Miss 
Phyllis O'Brien of Boston and Mr. 
and Mrs. Laurence Fesaenden of 
Wincheste r. 

Attending the performance of 
Friday are Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
D. Abbott, Mr, and Mrs. Lester C, 







! . Tj TUXEDOS 






fc^ FOR HIRE 






|Jt For AH 






WW Occasions 


PHILIP CHITEL 


MEN'S SHOP 


596 


Main Street 



LOCAL SERVICE 



Gustin, Jr., Dr, and Mrs. James W 
Seavet and Dr. and Mrs. Frederic 
L. Mathews. 

Gathering togethei are Messrs. 
and Mesdames Herman F. Pike, 
Fulton Brown, William Morton, 
Robert Abbott, Richmond Ordway, 
< raw ford Goldtbwait, Donald 
Growell, George Hall, Robert 
Reynolds, and Dr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Kirk wood, 

Mr, and Mrs, Marshall Symmes 
are entertaining Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Doyle, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Jones 
and Di. and Mr-. Rogei M. Bur- 
goyne. 

Mr. and Mis. Frank Booth are 
entertaining Mr. and Mrs. A. Allan 
Kimball at their home. 

Mi. and Mi.-. Rowland Patrick 
are entertaining Mis. ,1. Girard 
Chandler, Mr. and Mr-. Maxwell 
MeCreery, Mr. and Mr.-. Don S. 
(ireer. Mr. and Mis. Earl 'airier, 
Mi. and Mrs. Langeley Keyes, Mr. 
and Mrs. Harold Blanchard, Mr. 
and Mrs, Warren Jenney. Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard Bolster and Dr. and 
Mrs. Everett Tisdale. 

Also gathering together are 
Messrs. and Mesdames Shailer 
A very, Charles P. Reeves, Robert 
Kitteridge, Harrison Lyman. John 
Lyman. Lyman Snow, Walworth 
William.-. J. William Smith, Jr.. F. 
Marshall Sargent, N'eedham Brown 
and Henry K. Potter. Jr. 

On Saturday night those getting 
together for a hit of fun are Mr 
and Mrs. Thomas Aldrich, Jr., Mr. 
and Mrs. J. ( handler Hill, Mr. and 
Mis. Benjamin Wild, Mr. and Mr-. 
Percy Goodale, Jr., Mr. "and Mrs. 
Charles Moore, Mr. and Mr-. John 
Howard, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth 
Colony, Mr, and Mrs. Lawrence 
Tobey, Mr. and Mis. John Dexter. 
Mr. and Mi -. Donald Conant, and 
Mr. John Bottger. 

Gathering with Mr. and Mr-. 
Harris Richard -on are Messrs. and 
Mesdames Kingman Cass. Frank- 
lin Lane, E. Oher I'i ide, J. Russell 
Goldsberry, U. A. Hicks, G. II. Bix- 
hy, Wilford Cuthertson, W. Allan 

> LOCAL SERVICE 



Wilde, Samuel Cole, Charles P. Le- 
Royer and Dr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Riddle-. Mis. M. R. Brackett, and 
Mr. Bruce Clark. 

Going together to the Cabaret 
are Mr. and Mrs. John Page, Mr. 
and Mis. J. Norton Kidder, Mr. 
..tid Mrs. David W. Shean, Jr., Mr. 
and Mr.-. Robert Ingraham. Jr., Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Roundy, Mr. and 
Mrs. Franklin 0. Adam-. Mr. and 
Mi -. Joseph Dolhen. Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Fletcher, Mr, and Mis. 
Charles Wadsworth, Mr. and Mis. 
Stanley N'eill and Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert M. Smith. 

Also going to the Cabaret to- 
gether are Messrs. and Mesdames 
William P. Coady, Royce Randlett, 
Lindsay Caldwell. Roderick Bullen, 
George A. Rivinius, and Mrs. Har- 
rison Simpson. 

Also Di. and Mi-. Richard J. 
Clark, Di. and Mrs. Gustav Kauff- 
man, Dr. and Mis. William Hickey 
and Dr, and Mrs. Gordon Winchell. 

Also Mi. and Mis. Percy Bugbee, 
Mr. and Mrs. T. P. Wilson, Mr. and 
Mrs. Loring Nichols, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harold Bugbee, Mr. and Mis. Rich- 
aid Parkhurst and Dr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Jackson. 

Gathering together also for the 
show are Mi. and Mrs. Harry Hood. 
Jr., Mr, and Mis. G. M. Herrick, 
Mi. and Mrs. Cat rick D. Kennedy, 
Mi. and Mi-. Donald Badger, Mr. 
and Mrs. Bradford Bentley, Mr. and 
Mrs. Austin Broadhurst, Mr. and 
.Mi -. Paul Hutchinson, and Mr. and 
Mr-. Arthur V. Rogers* 



WINCHESTER HOME 
GARDEN ( LIB 



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I WINCHESTER APPLIANCE CO. 

1 5 Thompson Street Winchester 6-2990 



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WLN< MESTEH RED < R<><S 

Both classes in First Aid w hich 
the Winchester Re,! Cross is con- 
ducting have been tilled. New 
classes will he formed a-' soon as 
enough registrations are received 
. . . Mi-. Stanley II. Walters and 
Mis. Richard Fenno, both Regis- 
tered Nurses, will go to the Red 
Cross Home Nursing Training 
Institute in Salem on Monday . . . 
The Motor Corps station wagon 
made a trip to Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital on Tuesday. 

W INCH EST FR R F.S IDE N I S 
INTERESTED 



On Wednesday afternoon. Jan- 
uary IT the Winchester Home and 
Garden Club met at the Winehestei 
Library with a beautiful back- 
ground' of oils of mountain scenery 
by one of our members. Mrs. Mai- 
shall Symmes, and flowers by Miss 
Bennett-Jones of Roekport. Mi-. 
Frank J. Robinson presided. 

Mi-. Norman Mitchell, Horticub 
tural Chairman, gave some timely 
garden suggestions. She announced 
that the Garden Club Federation 
was ha\ »ig an illustrated lecture at 
Horticultural Hall on January "Jl* 
at 10:30 by Dr. Donald Wyman of 
the Arnold Arboretum on "Better 
Shrubs for your Garden." There 
will hi' a description of the -13 
recommended shrubs. The lecture 
will he preceded by half-hour clinic, 
ten minutes of which will be de- 
voted to further discussion of these. 
Any member of the Winchester 
Home and Garden Club will be wel- 
comed at this free lecture. 

One of our members, Mrs. John 
Chapman, gave a most interesting 
program called "Botanizing from 
a Car," illustrated with wonderful 
colored slides. Mrs. Chipman re- 
ceived Ph. D. in Botany from the 
University of Michigan and has 
added interest to this with her 
camera. She showed us the shelf 
of books and pamphlets she took 
with her. These slides were ac- 
tually selected from pictures taken 
on various western trips during the 
past sis; years and showed plants 
and flowers in all environment?! 
from tlse desert to the Rockies to 
Southern California, with many 
splendid hit- of scenery included. 
The Club is most grateful to Mrs. 
Chipman for a rare treat. 




REV, I. 



KKM'K I. Ii Ml 



MIDDLESEX MEDIC 
SOCIK I V 



\L 



LOCAL SERVICE 



LOCAL SERVICE 



A feature of Mrs. John F. 
Brown's 3-day Antiques Show and 
Sale at John Hancock Hall, Bos- 
ton, next Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday. January 2th 30 and 31 
from 1 to 10 p. m. daily will be the 
exhibit of the Boston Tuberculosis 
Association's Sheltered Workshop. 
Among Winchester residents in- 
terested in the success of this sale 
of needlework, household articles 
and reproductions of period furni- 
ture made in the Sheltered Work- 
shop is the Hon. Raymond S. Wil- 
kins, member of the Association's 
council. 



A joint meeting of the Middle- 
sex East District Medical Society 
and the Woman's Auxiliary was 
held Wednesday, Januai v is, at the 
Bear Hill Golf Club in 'Wakefield. 

Follow ing dinner Dr. behind Mc- 
Kittrick, President of the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society, ad- 
dressed the gathering. Dr. Mc- 
Kittiick discussed recent medical 
legislation, draft legislation with 
respect to the drafting of Doctors, 
and keeping the American Medical 
Association alive. He stated that 
actually only two Doctors bad been 
drafted, and those only through the 
regulai draft. He expressed the 
hope that drafting Doctors might 
not be necessary. He urged all 
the members present t a whole 
heartedly support the American 
Medical Association. For there is 
now a greater need for the Associa- 
tion than ever before. 

A film entitled "M. D. - U. S. 
Doctor" was then shown. It depict- 
ed the Doctor as he is today. It 
showed the great strides achieved 
in modern day medicine, which en- 
able the Doctor to l ender much bet- 
ter service as a result thereof. It 
is a superb production, and will 
soon be released for the public at 
large. 



TO \ DDK ESS HI STORK VI, 
Mi l TIN*. 

Rev. Laurence L Bai her of Ai I- 
ington, well-known historian, 
photographer and lecturer, will be 
the guest speaker at the wintel 
meeting of the VVinchestei His- 
torical Society on Saturday after- 
noon, February at o'clock. 
The meeting will be held in the 
Art Gallery of the Winchester 
Public Library, with Mrs. George 
E, < onnor presiding. Mr. Barber's 
topi,- will }„■ -New England His- 
toric and Scenic", with beautiful 
colored slides. 

Mr. Barber is well known in 
Winchester, and has many friends 
heii'. Fin 1.) years he was minis- 
tor of pleasant Street Congrega- 
tional ( lunch in Arlington, and 
since resigning that oilice live 
yen is ago, has been in constant de- 
mand a- a lecturer. Hi- photo- 
graphic trips have taken him all 
over the continent, and he has 
crossed the Arctic Circles in both 
Alaska and Labrador. Recently he 
has been pi otogiaphing many his- 
toric spots in New England, and 
these unusual "shots" will he fea- 
tured on Saturday. 

For the past twelve year- Mr 
Barber has been President of the 
Arlington Historical Society, and 
for two terms was president of the 
Hay State Historical League. His 
many articles have appeared in 
Antique- Magazine and other pub- 
lications. 

At the meeting on February .'!, 
Miss Clara Russell, curator. Will 
have on exhibit for members the 
handsome old highboy given to the 
society by Mrs. John Blank. 

J \ZZ BABY SECOND! 



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Dec. 31 of next year that figure will be increased 
to 61%! 



VOI I II SUNDAY AT 
UNITARIAN CHURCH 

The Winchester Unit a r i an 
Church will make their traditional 
observance of Youth Sunday this 
Sunday when the young people of 
the chinch will take over the con- 
duct of the regular morning ser- 
vice. Youth Sunday is observed 
annually by Unitarians and Cni 
versalists in the United States and 
Canada, and the Winchester church 
has given yearly pleasure and in- 
terest to its parish by its practice 
of having the younger people ac- 
tually take over the pulpit on that 
day. 

Taking part in the service Sun- 
day will be: Invocation, by Jack 
Mills; Responsive Reading, by 
Stowell Symmes; Scripture anil 
Prayer, by Martha Hewins. Ser- 
monettes will be preached as fol- 
lows: "Strength", by .lost Michel- 
sen; "Vision", by Walter P. Keyes. 
Jr.; and "Courage", by Henry A 
Dellk'ker, Jr. I'sheis for the day 
are to be Polly Kroell, Marcia 
Symmes, Ted Johnston, and Clark 
Hottell. In addition to music by 
the regular choir, the Junior Choir 
will sing a special anthem to ob- 
serve this speeial day. 



Old time residents of Winches- 
ter will recall Rob Fogg, first as a 
Winchester boy and later as one of 
the pioneer aviators hereabouts. He 
now lives in Roslyn Heights, N. V., 
and is a reserve officer waiting his 
recall to active service. During 
World War I he flew a fighter 
plane which he called "Jazv. Baby" 
with the name painted on the snout 
of the plane. 

Recent press dispatches from 
Korea have cited Bob Fogg's son 
and namesake. First I.t. Robert 
Fogg, Jr.. as probably the greatest 
fighting flyer in that embroiled 
country. In two years official dis- 
patches say he has flown lOOt) 
hours. 13(5 of them in an F-86 Sabre 
jet, the fastest fighter plane in 
combat, rolling up an impressive 
record for destroying Communist 
troops and equipment with his dare 
devil flying. 

Young "Bob's" father recently 
received a picture of his son stand- 
ing beside his famous Sabre fet. 
Winchester friends of "old Boh" 
will understand the thrill he got 
when he saw painted on the nose of 
his son's fighting ship. "Jazz Babv 
2nd." 

KLKS' LADIES' NIGHT 

Winchester Lodge of Klks will 
hold its annual Ladies' Night Sat- 
urday evening. January 27 a t 
Waterfield Hall, commencing with 
a banquet served at 7 o'clock. Danc- 
ing will follow the banquet until 
midnight. Newell Furrington is 
chairman of the committee in 
charge of arrangements for the 
event which is fast becoming one 
of the most popular on the entire 
lodge calendar. 

HITLDINC PERMITS 

The following building permits 
have been issued by the Building 
Department for week ending 
Thursday, January Is, 19*51; 
New Dwelling: 

558 South Border road 
7 Oakland Circle 



THIS IS 
NO FISH STORY 

WE MAY BE LOCATED IN THE 
OLD MARKET BUT .... OUR NEW 
MERCHANDISE STILL HAS THE SAME 
QUALITY - FRESHNESS - AND STYLE 
AS BEFORE. 



PHILIP CHITEL MEN S SHOP 



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Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



B \1 ST \ I F H1STORK VI. 
I F \(iUE 

<i n Saturday, January 2u, the 
Bav State League met in Speare 
Hall at Boston University, Di. 
Daniel Marsh welcomed the League 
most cordially, and then mentionel 
some of the high-lights of the beau- 
tiful Marsh Chapel. He -poke of 
the four windows on the right, each, 
depicting a door sacred to the four 
faiths — that of Solomon's Temple, 
St. Peter's in Rome, Castle Church 
in Wittenburg, and City Road 
Chapel, London. < in the opposite 
side were four windows each with 
a college tower-Oxford, Coakes- 
burg, (Maryland), Wesleyan and 
Boston University. Two memorial 
windows honored faculty; one for 
religion and the other science, 
represented by Alexander Graham 
Bell. Those representing Alumni 
showed Booker T. Washington, and 
the other the "Four Chaplains", 
one of whom was named Fox and 
was an Aluninu.-. 

"Boston Men and the Winning of 
American Independence" was the 
title of the address by Dr. Robert 
F. Moody, Professor of History. 
Some of these men were among the 
16 whose portraits were painted by 
the famous artist Robert S. Chase 
and given by him to the University, 
in 1945. Those in the Prelude 
(1630- 1760) included John Win- 
throp. Cotton, Kndecott, Increase 
and Cotton Mather, Jonathan 
Mayhew a n d Samuel Cooper. 
George Ill's portrait was one of 
four in The Crisis. In the Climax- 
were James Otis and Samuel 
Adams. 1780 was the Consumma- 
tion containing pictures of John 
Adams, Henry Knox, John Han- 
cock, and George Washington 

There was an opportunity to see 
these portraits in the History 
room, as well as the Stone Lincoln 
Exhibits in the Treasure Room of 
the Library, and Marsh Chapel. 

Coffee, tea and cake were served 
in the Refectory through the gen- 
erosity of Dr. Marsh. Mr. and Mr- 
Marshall Symmes. Mrs. T. T 
Greenwood, Mrs. P. J. Glendon, 
Misses Clara Russell, Susie Gustin, 
Eleanor and Louise Bancroft and 
Violet Williamson were members 
of the Winchester Historical So 
ciety present. 

STOLE POLK) BANK 




Last Saturday morning the I'" 
lice were notified that three hoys 
had stolen one of the March of 
Dimes banks for the polio fund 
from Winchester Station and were 
headed toward the center. 

Officer Alfred Poole saw the boys 
running toward Vine street and 
gave chase, finally finding the boys 
hiding at the rear of the Legion 
House. He recovered the bank and 
the sum of $1.67 it contained 
which was turned over to a local 
representative of the March of 
Dimes campaign. 

Meanwhile the hoys' name- were 
taken at Police Headquarters and 
they were turned over to then 
parents. Their ages were ;i, in and 
1 1 years. 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



(.11!!. S( Ol T 

The C,aft Work Shop will be 
held at the office at 10 a. m. on 
Thursday, February 1st. This is 
for ail Intermediate Leaders. 

The Troop Advisor Course being 
given in Waltbani is a four day 
school. The group is made up of 
leaders from ibis Scout Section. 
Our representatives are Mrs. John 
Ryan, Mrs Frank McNally, Mrs, 
Anthony DeAngelis and Sirs. R, 
Robert Finn. The instructors are 
Mrs. Barbara Metcalf and Mr-. 
Rood, the Executive Secretary at 
Waltham. 

There will he an Organization 
Meeting at the office at Id a. m. 
February 2. 

Despite the weather a very suc- 
cessful class of the Ski School was 
held Saturday a1 the Country Club. 

This past week-end Mrs. Horsey 
took a group of Senior Scouts to 
Watervtlle Valley. N. IF, for a Ski- 
Trip. There is so much enthusiasm 
for this sport that two more similar 
weekends are planned. On Feb- 
ruary HI the Kersey Senior Troop 
will have eight boys as their guests 
and ski at Keene's, Etna, N. H , 
(near Hanover). On March 2 all 
Senior Girl Scouts will have a week- 
end Ski party at Mooselatike, Ra- 
vine Camp, Dartmouth Club at 
Warren. N. H. 

The first session of the Brownie 
Training Swap Shop was held this 
Tuesday the next meeting is 
Tuesday. January 30 All Brow- 
nie Leaders should plan to attend. 
Come with new program ideas and 
leave with many more. 

(.IRI S' It \SK ETBALL TEAM 
SW VMPS MELROSE 

Winchester's Varsity and Jay- 
Voe teams triumphed over Mel- 
rose, Friday. January 19, w i t h 
-cores of 53 - 17 and 40 - 1(), re- 
spectively. Both squads excelled 
in every phase of the game on their 
home floor. For the Varsity. Bette 
Kneeland was high scorer with 21 
points : and Sue Morton and Paula 
Lanigan shared second team honors 
with 8 points apiece. 

varsity 
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electric light and power companies 

OF NEW ENGLAND 




This Adivrtisemenl Sporuored by BOSTON EDISON COMPANY 



and how to 
tell a boy lobster from 
a girl lobster 

Gut dawn to the station a 
iittle late tin* morning and 
larely made the train. Didn't 
have time to buy a paper or 
even to get on my usual car. 
Made the last car with my coat 
.ill unbuttoned and thing in the 
wind and my hat in my hand. 
Rill, he's the brakeman on the 
8:08 had waved up ahead, but 
the engineer had spotted me. 
and waited for me to climb 
aboard. 

Wouldn't have been late if my car 
hadn't started acting up on the wav 
to the station and kept coughing and 
■ puttering. Glad I didn't have to drive 
into town. 

Sat down w ith a big feeling of relief. 
I don't think there's anvthmg more 
relaxing than settling down in a train 
after vou've had to hurry to make it. 
Sort of turn all your worries over to 
the eneineer and go to sleep, or get in 
a big argument about how to tell a 
bov iobster from a girl lobster, or just 
lit back and relax. 

Funnv how annoyed you get if a 
train s a couple of minutes laze when 
vou're on it but how you hope it's 
gome to be late when you're behind 
»chedule making it. 




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tilfiLS' V VRSITY LOSES I IIf^T 
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Tiio Arlington first team came to 
Winchester. Tuesday, February 
and went home happy with a 35 - 
i" win. Winchester fought hard 
and played well hut couldn't seem 
to make the irrade. However, the 
-econd team continued their unde- 
feated streak beating the Arlington 
Jay-Vees :t7 . 20, .Sonny Smith 
scoring 15 points. 

VARSITY 
Winrhnlfr 

KK Darnf.n. Mi-imz 

HF I^nijran, Paula 

I.K Neitay, Jean 

I.K Smith. Sonny 

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Rfi Smith. Hue- 

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35 



1 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 26. 1951 



< U'T. m sirs POSITION 
(Jl KSTIONED 

Editor of the Star; 

Every civic project always has 
its proponents ami opponents. Un- 
animity would be either Utopia or 
imposed dictatorship. Honest op- 
position can be respected. We can 
respect the person who frankly says 
he want* no added school building, 
or the one who believes, and says 
he believes, the program could be 
better done, and more cheaply, in 
the future. Such disagreements can 
be honest differences of opinion — 
honest dissents in judgment — the 
expression of which is our inalien- 
able right of citizenship. 

With all this in mind, it has been 
difficult to discover, at least by 
open statement from Captain Rush, 
what solution o f the secondary 
school problem he has to offer, 
whether he wants any solution, and 
it has been puzzling to appraise his 

motives in conducting a campaign 
marked by errors in facts, incon- 
sistencies, and derogatory appel- 
latives. 

Captain Rush has said the senior 
and the junior school building plans 
do not provide sufficient shop space. 
Do you know that Captain Rush, as 
a member of the School Committee, 
attended the committee meeting in 
December 1949 when the shop space 
Was approved? Do you know that 
the present plan* provide more shop 
area than Captain Rush approved? 

Captain Rush published a state- 
ment that the Building Committee 
has never entertained any construc- 
tive criticism. Did you know that as 
long as last April he was personal- 
ly and specially invited by the com- 
mittee to meet with it; that he fail- 
ed to appear? More than once since 
then the committee has invited his 
suggestions. He refused their of- 
fers. At the open forum held just 
before the November special town 
meeting the- various plans were 
shown and explained. He was pres- 
ent. He offered no criticism or rec- 
ommendation. It was not until the 
night of that town meeting that 
Captain Hush unleashed his cam- 
paign of criticism and opposition. 

During his activity in town af- 
fairs, has Captain Rush's judg- 
ment been infallible? In the heat 
of the present controversy, it has 
been alleged that the Parkhurst 
School was a "folly" of the School 
Committee, since it is already too 
small. Do you remember that the 
School Committee recommended a 
larger school" The Town Meeting 
voted a larger school. Captain Rush 
was active in the referendum which 
resulted in a year's delay, and a 
smaller school built of materials 
inferior to those first proposed, but 
at a cost which reflected the pre- 
vious year's rise in price of materi- 
als. 

Captain Hush says that the 
Building Committee's plan has been 
"pushed" through. Was it pushing 
when the members of the commit- 
te held over 65 formal meetings 
since May, 1949, published their 
proposals' in the Star, and also in- 
dividually and collectively appeared 
before groups in every corner of 
our town to explain their tentative 
proposals and to invite suggestions 
and recommendations ? 

In the Star of January 12, Cap- 
tain Rush ~tate* that "insensate 
pressure group*" are behind the 
plan and have forced another speci- 
al town meeting. 

The definition of "insensate" in 
Webster's includes the following: 
"Without sense, or intelligence . 
Without sensibility; unfeeling: 
brutal." If this adjective used by 
Captain Rush correctly describes 
our Mothers' Associations, and if it 
correctly describes the League of 
Women Voters, and if it correctly 
describes the Town Meeting mem- 
bers and all those citizens who 
voted favorably in the referendum, 
and if it correctly describes the 
hundreds of men and women who 
have petitioned for another special 
town meeting, then all such citizens 
who believe they are correctly 
working for the need and welfare 
of our school children are without 
sen*e or intelligence, are unfeeling, 
and brutal. 

Captain Rush's "Referendum 
Committee." with the exception of 
himself and Arthur .1. Hewis. has 
remained anonymous to date. At 
the public hearing. Captain Rush 
declined to identify the members, 
and any members present failed to 
identify themselves when the public 
invitation was extended to do so 

Rumors of statements alleged to 
have been made in behalf of this 
committee may or may not be cor- 
rectly quoted, and they are pre- 
sented herein as rumors subject to 
refutation by Captain Rush or other 
members of his committee: 

Rumor No. 1; That Precinct 1 
residents were threatened they 
must support the Building Commit- 
tee's plans, 01 they would not re- 
ceive an addition to George Wash- 
ington School. 1 am a resident of 
Precinct 1 I have worked for, and 
will continue to work for. an es- 
sential addition to that school. It is 
so urgently needed that it will 
stand on it* own merits before the 
Town Meeting. As a matter of 
practical logic, 1 publicly expressed 
the desire to have the secondary 
school program passed at the No- 
vember meeting, so that the George 
Washington addition would be the 
only school building problem before 
the March meeting. Any fanning of 
sectionalism lias no place in the 
overall problem of planning for 
all of Winchester's school children. 

Rumor No That the town em- 
ployees will get no increase in 
wages if the secondary school build- 
ing appropriations go through 
That the two matters are interde- 
pendent "i* news to me. In fact, 
at the November meeting 1 con- 
sidered a commitment was made 
that increases to be granted at the 
March meeting would be retroac- 
tive to the first of the year, and 
it is my understanding that the 
amount of such increases are now 
under discussion by the Finance 
Committee, heads of departments, 
and town employees. 

While Captain Rush has declined 
u> state his own solution to our sec- 
ondary school needs. 1 believe justi- 
fiable conclusion can be drawn 
from his latest prosposal. I can 
only conclude that he and his 



anonymous associates want noth- 
ing done; that they intend there 
shall be no secondary school addi- 
tion*. Captain Rush now dtmands 
that the present committee be dis- 
missed and a new committee ap- 
pointed. 

Is it because this would cause in- 
definite delay, since any new com- 
mittee needed either to re-affirm 
the recommendations of the present 
committee or to evolve any possible 
new recommendations ? 

Please remember, every elected 
and appointed town committee and 
board concerned has thoroughly in- 
spected the details of the Build- 
ing Committee's plans and has un- 
animously approved them. 

Please remember, town meeting 
member* voted 162 to 4 in favor. 

Please remember, at the polls on 
December 28, 19S0 there were 2 , _ , 71 
votes for, and V2'2l votes against, 
the first question. There were 
L!:',07 votes for, and 1189 votes 
against, the second question. On 
each question slightly more than 
65'', of those voting in favor. 

I suppose, however, we must as- 
sume, even if the Town Meeting 
again votes for the program, that 
Captain Rush and his anonymous 
committee again will demand a ref- 
ei endum. 

Roland H. Parker 
11H Forest street 



THE OUTSIDER LOOKS IN 

Kditor of the Star: 

To criticize the ineffectiveness of 
management is useless unless we 
are able to show how that same 
management can become more ef- 
fective; or lacking improvement, 
by a change of management. 

As an analyst of business suit- 
able for investment 1 necessarily 
see many in need of help. In most 
cases the management is working 
very hard, but failing of success for 
some reason which it fails to grasp. 
Usually this is because the man- 
agement has grown up with the 
business and does not know what 
others with similar problems are 
doing to solve them. For lack of 
comparison, they continue as they 
were, making the same mistakes 
over and over again. Yes, I ad- 
vocate work, but also an occasional 
look about. 

"If your nose i.. cloite to thf grind- 
stuni' rough, 
Ami if you hoi, I it down there long enough, 
In tittle you'll say there's no .such thinjf*. 
A. brooks that bubble or binU that sinK- 
The*.' three will all your world eotnpOSe, 
Just you, the atone, and yuur old nose." 

1 hear that the school board is 
working "very hard," and "it's a 
shame to discourage them." (Sure- 
ly 1 don't want to discourage any- 
body.) I hear that the school board 
wants and needs no advice. (A man 
is in a sad state when he no longer 
needs advice.) 

I don't want to embroil any other 
school in controversy, so to that 
end 1 am omitting the names of 
specific schools. My children did 
not attend Winchester schools, so 
I am truly an outsider, 

I took one boy to a well-known 
preparatory school and presented 
him to the Head Master. "What 
school did the lad come from," I 
was asked. "Shady Hill in Cam- 
bridge," I replied. - "Oh, that's 
all right, a very good school, we'll 
be glad to take him" I was told. 
Then I asked, ".Suppose I had said 
he had attended the Winchester 
schools, what would you have 
said?" The Head Master quickly 
said, "But I thought you just said 
he came from Shady Hill . . ." 
"And so I did. and so he did, but I 
wanted to know what you thought 
of the Winchester schools." He re- 
plied, "But that's beside the point, 
isn't it." (He might have said 

■ Winchester schools were good; but 
he didn't.) 

Later on, after this hoy had pre- 
pared, I took him to the Dean of 
Administrations at a large college, 

t and we went through the same kind 

1 of questioning. But he showed me 
the ranking on college entrances 
of boys from various preparatory 

| and high schools for the past year. 

I in fact for several years. 

With another hoy of mine, also 
prepared at Shady Hill. I entered 
him at two successive preparatory 
schools, one near-by and one near 
Detroit. In both eases the Head 
Master knew Shady Hill favorably 
and refused comment on Winches- 
ter. The same was true with col- 
lege, later, 

Now lest somebody think that 
this dissertation is confined t o 
boys, let me assure my audience 
that I went through the same pro- 
cedure and with the same results 
with my daughter, who had the 
choice of three top colleges, any 
of which expressed a desire to take 
her. All three declined comment 
about Winchester. 

By this I do not mean that an 
exceptional pupil can not prepare 
himself or herself at Winchester in 
such a way to draw credit to the 
college, but rather that it seems 
fairly firmly established that the 
average product of the Winchester 
schools is not expected to distin- 
guish himself. - And that the ap- 
plicant for preparatory school or 
college entrance must prove that 
he is an exception. 

I believe the excuse which I have 
heard repeated that the reason 
many pupils do so poorly in Win- 
chestei is that they become inter- 
ested in outside social events. It 
seems to me that to increase these 
social and athletic possibilities may 
well detract from scholarship. 
When 1 went to Newton High I 
wurked very hard indeed and had 
no time lot social activities. My 
objective was to get into college 
with a recommendation, - and in 
that 1 succeeded. I brought my 
lunch because there was no cafe- 
teria. Newton stands at the top 
of the list <if college preparatory 
schools, - but not because of its 
fine plant t all buildings are 4- 
story without cafeterias i and not 
because of its supreme playing 
fields. 

If the critical problem in Win- 
chester is that of primary schools, 
then 1 think our guiding citizens 

ild benefit by a visit to Shady 
Hill School, Cambridge, near Ml. 
Auburn Cemetery. That school has 
placed in plant, an absolute mini- 
mum, and devotes a maximum to- 
ward securing the best instruction 



available for its pupils. They will 
observe that building* are but of 
l-story, made of Celotex, with haid 
maple floors supported on piers, 
and with exposed rafters under the 
pitched roof covered with flame- 
resistant shingles. .The buildings 
each house two class rooms, one on 
either side of the entrance hall, 
where lockers are provided for 
clothing and rubbers, a drinking 
fountain, and opposite the entrance 
the toilets. I have been told that 
the architect who designed these 
simple structures charged no fee. 
I suggest that he be consulted t>> 
ascertain whether Winchester 
might not have permission to copy 
his design. This construction is of 
modest cost yet accomplishes the 
housing of a maximum number id' 
children. 

I suggest the examination o f 
teaching method*, the use of one 
regulai teachei supplemented by 
two apprentice teachers. Also their 
division of each grade into two 
halves. This means an upper 1st 
and a lower 1st, upper second and 
lower second, upper seventh and 
lower seventh. (They have 9 
grades. This prevents a bright 
scholar from being "paced" by the 

1 stupidest in a class, and permits 
promotion and demotion by easier 
steps. There are a number of other 
peculiarities worth observing. 

I suggest securing a list of those 
primary schools which rank "tops" 
with secondary schools. And a 
list of secondary schools which 
rank high with colleges. Then I 
suggest paying each a visit to find 

; out how they do it. 

Then, after the Schools in Win- 

i Chester have been made "tops" 
scholastically. I suggest spending 
what may be left over on mere 
plant. It would appear that what 
is needed is an overall program di- 
rected toward caring for the re- 
quirements of all schools, and not 
of just one; that the probable in- 
crease in children be considered, 
and that traffic hazards and trans- 
portation are vitally important in 
ehosing a location. Often the 
thinking of many minds produces 
better results than just one domi- 
nant mind. 

I have tried to be helpful, even 
though critical. At present I have 
the privilege of paying taxes for 
schooling which I hope may help 
some of our neighbors. The num- 
ber of school busses which 1 see 
from outside schools suggest that 
others are sharing my privilege of 
paying taxes. 

Darwin F. Gardner 
5 Fells road 



URGES VCTION NOW 

Fifth Anniversary Of School 
Building Committee 



WHAT IS BKST FOR 
WINCHESTER 



Editor of the Star: 

I have been giving our school 
system a great deal of thought. I 
have come to the conclusion that 
our school program turns out 
pupils well-equipped for college, 
but for those who cannot or are 
not fitted to go to college we do 
not supply the proper educational 
facilities and they do not receive 
a square deal. This fact is gener- 
ally recognized by the teaching 
profession but nothing is being 
done about it. I think we should 
adopt what is called the three and 
three system — three years in the 
Junior High and three years in the 
Senior High. The curriculum in 
the Senior High should be divided 
into two departments, one for those 
going to college and one for those 
who are going out into the world 
to make a living without a college 
education. This should include the 
business course now given in the 
High School as well as a good 
manual training course. This does 
not mean a trade school as is car- 
ried on in large communities. 

Two factors enter into a success 
ful life — the person's adaptability 
to the line of work chosen and the 
amount of common sense that the 
person is gifted with. Unless thej 
have these two talents all the 
education in the world will not du 
them any good. Unfortunately a 
great many people do not have the 
opportunity to choose the kind of 
work they wish to follow. Circum- 
stances play a large part in de- 
termining life's work. 

To my mind the way we are 
handling school building programs 
is all wrong. In the first place, the 
School Committee should know the 
needs of the schools. They should 
present these facts, with recom- 
mendations, to a Town Meeting and 
then if the members vote to ap- 
prove these recommendations a 
building committee should be ap- 
pointed and an appropriation made 
for tentative plans. This commit- 
tee should consist of a representa- 
tive from the School Committee 
and the balance of the committee 
should be made up of citizens 
familiar with construction. Aftei 
the plans are drawn they should be 
approved by the School Committee 
and presented to the Town for its 
approval and the necessary appro- 
priations made. We are living in 
very unsettled times. What the 
next few months will hung forth 
nobody knows. This country is in 
for a tremendous change. The de- 
mand for labor is increasing and 
the supply is decreasing. The pay 
for labor is much higher than the 
pay for college graduates. We 
know little of this condition in 
Winchester but in other towns it 
is becoming a serious problem. Be- 
fore a very large expenditure is 
made let us know where We are 
going and be sure we are looking 
forward to the new conditions in- 
stead of fooling ourselves into be- 
lieving that things are going to re- 
main the same. From a business 
standpoint the school building pro- 
gram should be held up until we 
have a clear picture of what we 
need in school buildings and how- 
cost*, material and labor are to be 
affected by present conditions. The 
estimates that we now have for 
the cost of new school buildings are 
not based on the present prices. 
Many increases in prices have re- 
cently been made and much ma- 
terial is being restricted in use. It 
may be that we cannot build at 
present. 

We all want what is best for 
Winchester in these changing 
times. Let's think before we leap 
so we can land right side up. 

Fd Sanderson. 

2 Di.X street 



Editor of the Star: 

Efforts to solve the secondary 
school problem of our Town have 
drawn heavily on the abilities and 
time of conscientious citizens. 

Since the 1 D 4 < i Town Meeting 
three Special Committees have 
wrestled with the problem of sec- 
ondary school facilities. These 
committees are: 

Committee on School Facilities 
and Activities: 
Neil H. Borden 
Hazen H. Aver 
Frederick S." Hatch. 
Myra B. Coon 
Robert M. Stone 
Franklin J. Lane 
Clinton F. Farnham 
Junior High School Addition 
Commit tee: 
Philip P. Wadsworth 
Nicholas H. Fitzgerald 
Neil H. Borden 
Charles T. Main II 
Richard M. Rush 
High School and Enlarged Junior 
High School Building Committee: 
Rachel T. Kimball 
Howard R. Bartlett 
Charles E. Jellison 
William W. Davies 
Robert .1. Fletchei 
Charles II. Gallagher 
Ruth Higgins 
Leslie A. Tucker 
A salute to these citizens whose 
sense of civic duty has matched 
their ability and industry. The list 
of these workers is an impressive 
one and Winchester has reason to 
he proud of the loyalty and devo- 
tion of its citizens. 

During this same time the fol- 
lowing have been elected to the 
School Committee. They have 
spent hundreds of hours in con- I 
ferenee with the Building Commit- 
tees in addition t o their regular 
School Committee duties: 
Neil H. Borden 
Hazen W. Aver 
Leo W. Garvey 
Christine E. Greene 
Harry C. Mueller 
Ruth C. Smith 
Marion \". Chandler 
Richard M. Rush 
William J. Speers, Jr. 
Howard R. Bartlett 
Charles E. Jellison 
Daniel T. Chane 
Sara C. Woodward 
A poll has been taken of all those 
committee members listed above, 
now living in Winchester, on the 
question of their approval of the 
present School Building Commit- 
tee's Alternate Plan. One member 
takes no position either for or 
against, one is opposed, and one is 
out of town. All the others ex- 
pressed their approval of the Al- 
ternate Plan as the only practical 
solution of our pressing school 
building needs. These are the 
people who have studied the long- 
est and know the most about the 
situation and the possibilities for a 
building program for the schools. 

March Town Meeting marks the 
fifth anniversary of the forming of 
the first Building Committee. Dur- 
ing this time an ever enlarging area 
of agreement by the townspeople as 
to the proper plan has grown. 

Time is running out. To take care 
of increasing school enrollments 
this problem must be solved now. j 
In our discussions and actions we 
all should bear constantly in mind 
the urgent needs and welfare of 
Winchester's children. 

Sincerely yours, 
Mi*s A. Natalie Jewett, 
Town Affairs Chairman 
League of Women Voters 
of Winchester 

WRITES OF Rl'SSIAN 
PRISON LIFE 

The following letter from a re- 
turned German who was a prisoner 
in a Russian Concentration Camp 
was received by Mr. John Bushel! 
of Salisbury street, a member of 
the Crosseup-Pishon Legion Post 
in Boston which has been sponsor- 
ing the sending of clothing to Ger- 
man war prisoners returning home 
from Russian prison camps. 

Mr. Bushell sent clothing abroad 
during one of the drives and the 
recipient found his name in one of 
the garments, writing him of his 
gratitude and of how much the 
clothing means to those who re- 
ceive it. 

For obvious reasons the Ger- 
man's name is not made public. 
His letter, however, should prove 
of the greatest interest. A transla- 
tion of it follows: 

Bremen, 

August 30, 1950 

Mr. John Bushell, 
Salisbury street, 
Winchester, Mass. 
U. S. A. 

Dear Honored Mr. Bushell: 

"It grieves me deeply that I can- j 
not write this letter to you in Eng- j 
lish, but I do not master English • 
and so I rind myself compelled to ' 
impart in German to you what I 
should like very much to tell from j 
the bottom of my heart for your i 
gift of clothing. You will perhaps | 
understand how valuable the ar* 
tides from you are that were given | 
out in a friendly way at the Dispo- 
sal Center if I describe to you my | 
fate in a few line*. At the outset. | 
however, I should tell you that the I 
clothing wa* distributed uy the \ 
Church Service fur Prisoners of 
War and Returnee*, l.temen. Con- 
gregation Rureau, I' L. Frauen i 
I town ) on tlie Markt. This or- 
ganization concerns it-en parti 
culariy with the soldiers returning 
home out of Russian captivity and 
settled in Bremen. As I have 
learned, the gift was *ent by the 
Crosscup Pishon Post 'ZHl, Amer- 
ican Legion, Boston, Mass. 

"Concerning myself. I may be ! 
permitted to tell you i insofar as it ' 
may interest you) that I came back 
a few weeks ago after years of 
captivity. I was settled in West 
Prussia (by Marienwerden. There 
I called my own ( possessed > a 
large farm of approximately 300 
acres. Early in January 1945, 1 
had to take flight with the forward 
advance of the Eastern front, and 
was drafted into the Wehrmaeht 
while fleeing, was taken prisoner 
of the Russians at the surrender of 
Danzig. Apart from the fact that 
1 lost my entire property t house 



and farm I my remaining persona! 
possessions were taken from me by 
the Russian soldiers. Then at the 
imprisonment they found papers on 
me (nit of which especially came 
the fact that I possessed a farm 
and I was designated a Capitalist 
and was assigned to a concentra- 
tion camp in the Eastern Zone of 
Germany. 

"The years I had to spend with 
the most brutal treatment and 
scantiest nourishment were the 
very worst of my life. From May 
1945 to September 1948 I was as- 
signed to the Neubrandenburg 
Concentration Camp. We averaged 
17,000 prisoners here (approxi- 
mately 1,000 women included). In 
the wintei of 194C. - 47. we had 
loo die daily. The people literally 
starved to death. In September 
1948, I was transferred to Buche- 
wald. The treatment here was 
even more atrocious than at Neu- 
brandenburg. Ill treatment of the 
half-starved prisoners by the Rus- 
sian guards occurred continually. 
The work quota was made so high 
that it simply could not be met. 

"In June 1949, as a consequence. 
I went to the hospital with com- 
plete mal nutrition. I weighed at 
that time less than 50 K. G. as com- 
pared to normal weight of 75 K. G. 
Against expectations, in February 
of this year a general release of 
prisoners took place. For me, too. 
the door of freedom opened. Un- 
fortunately, this was not the case 
with all prisoners as the Commu- 
nist pies* of the East Zone wished 
it to be believed through world 
publicity, loo tnen f rom R Uf he- 
wald were carried off at night with 
the utmost secrecy into the Soviet 
Union. The Soviets transferred a 
further 1200 to the Woldheim pri- 
son. Among them were women 
with children. At the same time 
the release "proluted" the active 
burial squad. By this thev wanted 



to prevent any information what- 
soever becoming known concerning 
the height of the number of the 
dead. After my release I went at 
once to West Berlin as the danger 
was present for a released prisoner 
from the Fast Zone as long as he 
remained in the East Zone that he 
would be reincarcerated. Through 
the years of malnutrition in con- 
centration camps, a severe tuber- 
culosis took hold of me and made 
it necessary that I had to look up 
a hospital first of all in West Ber- 
lin. After a partial recovery I was 
flown into the West Zone of Ger- 
many. I now live here in Bremen 
with my sister. 

"Unfortunately my lung disease 
allows me to work very little. Still 
I hope that I shall get over this. 
So much of the story of my fate. 

"I hope that 1 have given you a 
survey of what I have experienced 
in the past years I have written 
this to you because I am of the 
opinion that you have the right to 
know, due to your gift, who re- 
ceived it. 

"I would like to close now 
with another cordial "Thank you". 
You may rest assured that your 
gift meant a valuable assistance to 
me in my great need. 

"With cordial greetings from 
continent to continent." 

Name Withheld. 



SEVERAL BILLS AFFECTING 
W I N ( HESTER -ARM NGTON 
SCHEDULED FOR PUBLIC 

HEARING JANUARY 31. 1951 



At 10:30 a. m.. on Wednesday. 
January 31, before the Committee 
on Metropolitan Affairs, in Room 
207, at the State House, several 
bills affecting Winchester-Arling- 
, ton with regard to better trans- 
portation and traffic relief will be 
given a public hearing. Most of 
these bills were introduced by Rep- 



resentative Henry E. Keenan of 
Arlington. These bills concern all 
residents of Winchester- Arlington, 
as well as the representatives of 
town and civic organizations, and 
they should be present at this hear- 
ing and voice their opinions. 

These bills call for the under- 
ground extension of the Harvard 
Square subway to Porter Square, 
and then overground to the vacant 
land just off the Concord Turnpike, 
where a terminal will be built. 
(Good for Winchester I 

Another bill calls for the con- 
veyance of this land from the 
Metropolitan District Commission 
to the Metropolitan Transit 
Authority for the purpose of build- 
ing the terminal. 

The other bills call for an over- 
pass, underpass oi traffic circle, 
to be built at the junction of Massa- 
chusetts avenue and Ale wife Brook 
Parkway at the Arlington-Cam- 
bridge line, and for similar con- 
struction at the junction of Broad- 
, way and Alewife Brook Parkway 
1 at the Arlington-Somerville line. 

There is also a bill calling for the 
building of an extension of Mystic 
Valley Parkway in Medford on the 
Mcdford side of the Mystic River 
to allow traffic coming down from 
Winchester or Woburn to stay on 
the Medford side of the Mystic 
River instead of coming back into 
Arlington. Another bill calls for 
the rerouting of Route 00 to Route 
10 for pleasure vehicles. 

It is hoped that many of the 
citizens of Winchester and of Arl- 
ington will attend this hearing. 



The many lengths of pipe some 
twelve and one half inches in dia- 
meter passing through town on the 
railroad are for the new natural 
gas pipe line which is to be con- 
| structed in the spring. It is un- 
loaded in Wilmington where it will 
be stored until used. 




filene's 



Stack the dishes, gather the neighbors 

hurry in MONDAY at the stroke of 9:15! 

WINCHESTER 

stocktaking 



sale 




Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 
January 29, 30, and 31 



Lime tor ii- to clear our racks anil shelves 

make ready for row >priim ami Summer merchandise 

yet week- of winter ahead lor you to enjo\ flu-.- value 



women -. misses*, junior-' dresses 

coat-, sportswear, underwear 

negligees, accessories 

infants', toddler**, girls", children"-. 

hi-schoolers wear 

men'- ftirni-hing- 

Not e\er> item in all -i/.i- and color- and in -ome case., previous markdown- have been taken. 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 1951 



5 



HOOPSTERS WON BY 
NARROW MARGIN 



Winchester High pulled out a 
hard-fought 51 - 4fi victory over a 
scrappy Reading High team at 
Reading last Tuesday afternoon. 
This was no routine win for the Red 
and Black for Reading was very ag- 
gressive and the narrow court 
hampered the local offense con* 
giderally. Winchester was leading 
only 42 - 40 as the last quarter be- 
gan hut the locals out-fought Read- 
ing over the final minutes to take 
a well-deserved victory. 

The first quarter was extremely 
fast as Reading took a 1<> - 15 lead 
at the end of the opening session. 
Winchester played its best ball of 
the game in the second period as 
they opened up a 31 - 24 lead at the 
intermission. The third period was 
a hectic one for the locals as Read- 
ing outscored them to close the gap 
to 42 - 40 as the period ended. It 
was either team's game in the final 
quarter as scoring was held to a 
minimum by the close guarding on 
both sides. The locals showed that 
they have the qualities of a cham- 
pion, however, as they limited 
Reading to six points in that peri- 
od while collecting nine themselves 
on two baskets b y Symmes, a 
basket and two fouls by Long, and 
a foul by Farrell. 

Rodney Long, Doug Hawkins, and 
Stowell Symmes would qualify as 
the heroes of the Winchester vic- 
tory. This trio headed the scoring 
for Winchester as Hawkins and 
Long continued to rebound very ef- 
fectively while Symmes came 
through with two beautiful baskets 
in the crucial final quarter. Long 
played one of his best games of the 
season, particularly after Hawkins 
had fouled out in the last quarter 
and he had to do most of the de- 
fensive rebounding with some time- 
ly help by Charlie Murphy. For the 
statistically minded, the Red and 
Black continued to shoot well as 
they made good on 37 per cent of 
their shots at the basket. 

The Winchester Seconds had 
their troubles on Tuesday, also, as 
they nosed out the Reading Sec- 
onds 42 - 38. This was only the sec- 
ond time in ten games that the sec- 
onds have been hard pressed to win 
but they came through with a nice 
victory. Bob Flaherty paced the 
local scoring with 10 points while 
Joe Donlon seemed to find the 
rough going to his liking as he 
played a whale of a game offensive- 
ly and defensively. 

The summary: 

Winchester High 

K t pts. 

Symmes. ]f 4 •> 111 

KoreKter. If ft 0 0 

l.onjr, rf 4 :i 1 1 

Farrell, rf 1 1 :t 

Hawkins, c 7 11', 

Murphy. Ik 2 15 

Dilorio, rg 8 17 




THE FOR TNIGHTLY 



TVtnk 



McQueen. If 
Gibson, rf 
Roche, rf 
Snrdam, c 
Kunge. lg 
Bennett, rg 
Hovey, rg 



Re»dinK High 



21 '.i 51 

g f pis. 

4 1 9 

5 111 
1 0 2 
7 4 IK 
1 1 3 

0 1 1 

1 0 2 



The Fortnightly again filled 
Masonic Hall to capacity when on 
Monday, January 22 it featured 
Marion T. Rudkin, popular literary 
critic. 

Mrs, Rudkin with her sound judg- 
ment of literary merit, coupled with 
hei irrepressible, delightful humor 
and dramatic ability presented a 
splendid program, valuable not 
only for its analytical review of 
current books but for the healthy- 
stimulus of shared joy and laugh- 
ter. Her lively wit, expressed in un- 
equalled satire in the dismissal of 
objectionable books was also keenly 
appreciated. Relevant to this, she 
stated, "If you must read books 
filled with vulgarity and obscenity, 
borrow them. Do not encourage 
the author by purchasing one." 

The following are some of the 
current books recommended by 
Mis. Rudkin: 

Foxfire — By Anya Seton. A 
story of great and enduring love 
between husband and wife. A 
wholesome novel with plenty of 
suspense and action. 

Joy Street - - - By Fiances 
Keycs. Wholesome reading with a 
(contribution to the racial problem. 
\ The locale of the story on Beacon 
• Hill, Boston gives the novel an 
! added interest to all New Eng- 
enders as well as a controversial 
theme for Bostonians. 

The Left Hand of God - - - By 
William Barrett. A powerful, re- 
ligious theme, beautifully done. 
Excellent reading. 

Non-Fiction: 

Look Younger and Live Longer 

- By Dr. Howser. An interesting 
and worthwhile book. 

Water Dousing - - - By Kenneth 
Roberts, A book of documented 
statements on the authenticity of 
water dousing. 

Fritz Kreisler. A Biography. De- 
lightful, entertaining and excel- 
lent reading. 

Committee Activities 

The second morning meeting 
sponsored by the Education Com- 
mittee will he held at the home of 
Mrs. Charles Mason, 43 Wedge- 
mere avenue, on Mondav, January 
20 from 10:00 a. m. to 12:00 noon. 
Mrs. Paul H. Howard, Chairman, 
urges Fortnightly members to 
come early to enjoy the coffee and 
social hour preceding the program 
which begins at 10:45. Mr. Edward 
Brannon, Assistant Superintendent 
of the Massachusetts Hospital 
School for Crippled Children will 
be the speaker. 



BAPTIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP 

Tonight, Friday, January 26th, at 
o'clock, is the time and the Recrea- 
tion Hall of the First Baptist 
Church is the place for the month- 
ly Youth Fun-Nite held under the 
direction of Coach Meurling. This 
is scheduled for a Friday night so 
that all young people can come out 
and have a good time. Refresh- 
ments will be served. 

Next Sunday, January 28th, is 
Youth Sunday in most of the Pro- 
testant churches and the First Bap- 
tist Chuurch is recognizing it with 
the young people assisting in the 
Morning Sanctuary service. The 
service will be conducted by five of 
our young people: Patricia Newhall, 
Philip Dresser, Sherman Joseph- 
son, Walter Bosselman and James 
Ekstrom. The Director of Youth 
| Activities, John Hunt Chappie, will 
speak on "The Children of Light 
and the Children of Darkness." The 
Youth Choir is taking an impor- 
tant part in the service with the 
singing of one of the anthems. One 
of the highlights of the service will 
be the presentation by the Pastor, 
Rev. Walter Lee Bailey, who is also 
chaplain of Fellsland Council Boy- 
Scouts of America, of God and 
Country Scout Awards to two of the 
young men of our church, Rich- 
ard Foster and Cecil Pride. Robert 
Ripley will be presented the Gold 
Church Scout award leading up to 
the God and Country award. Also 
one scout from the Church of the 
Epiphany. Stanley Mullen, Jr., has 
earned the God and Country award 
under the direction of Mr." Bailey, 
hut his award will be presented to 
him by his own pastor. Our con- 
gratulations certainly go to these 
fine young church men. 

The Youth Choir is anxious to 
have all its members and any new 
prospects out to the Thursday 
evening rehearsals. These are 
scheduled for from (5:45 to 7:30, al- 
lowing plenty of time for other 
plans. Please be on hand at 0:45 
next Thursday evening and help out 
your friends and your church in 
this fine choir. 

On Sunday evening, February 
4th, the Baptist Youth Fellowship 
will meet at its regular hour, 0:30 ' 
n. m. The worship service will be 
conducted by Stuart Carlisle. The 
theme is "We have this life, what 
are we going to do with it?" Re- 
freshments will be in charge of ! 
Donald MacFeeley and Sandra 
Saltmarsh. 

HEATING FI ND CAMPAIGN 
LAUNCHED 




FATHERS' NIGHT AT 
MYSTIC SCHOOL 



M. S. I". C. A. 

Winchester Auxiliarj 
For all calls phone 
LOng«ood K-6100 



The Winchester M. S. P. C. A. 
Auxiliary met at the home of Mrs. 
John II. Clarke, 1 -lit Highland ave- 
nue, on Thursday, January 18. Mrs. 
Alfred Hildreth the president held 
a short business meeting and sev- 
eral matters were discussed. 

The speaker of the afternoon was 
Dr. Frit- Hansen, President of the 
M. S. P. C, A. and head of Angell 
Memorial Hospital in Boston. Dr. 
Hansen spoke most interestingly, 
and suggested that the Winchester 
group continue with the work of 
raising money and have in mind 
some definite project. Mrs. Hil- 
dreth suggested the support of a 
cage in the hospital and sending 
money each year for that purpose. 
Mrs. Beggs proposed this as a 
memorial to Mrs. Richard Tayloi 
who started the Winchester Society 
and worked so tirelessly in every 
way to help the animals in and 
around the community. Dr. Han- 
sen thought this an excellent idea, 
and went on to tell of some phases 
of the work in the hospital and to 
the surprise of many, said there 
were at least 400 patients there- 
daily, requiring cages and hospital 
supplies. He was appreciative of 
the help Winchester had given 
in the past and was emphatic in 
the hope the organization would 
continue in a similar way in the 
future, 

The Angell Memorial Hospital 
now has two ambulances and will 
call for injured or stray animals at 
any time. The Winchester Police 
weie highly commended for their 
fine cooperation, and dogs may be 
taken to the police station until 
the ambulance arrives. A cage is 
to be left there for stray cats so 
they may have a refuge for a short 
period. 

At the close of the meeting Mrs. 
Clarke served a delicious tea and 
everyone enjoyed a friendly social 
hour. 



Totals 19 
Kefcree*. Putnam am! Marshall 



MEDFOR1) FLIGHT 
C. A. P. 

The Medford Flight has four ac- 
tive Winchester members. Second 
Lieutenant Henry A. Dellicker, Jr., 
will have completed two years' ser- 
vice in February. Alvan George 
Smith, Jr., joined the Civil Air 
Fatrol the first of June 1950. Joan 
P. DiBona joined the Medford 
Flight early this fall. Our latest 
recruit is Phyllis Gilberto. 

"Air Power Is Peace Power" is 
not a slogan, it is a serious fact 
and should be recognized by all 
who read the daily papers. " The 
future welfare and security of our 
nation depends on the air superior- 
ity of the only peace loving Nation 
industrially strong enough to main- 
tain peace, the United States. 

Air superiority means more than 
a 70 Group Air Force, strong Naval 
and Marine Air Forces, it means 
an airwise and air conscious popu- 
lation. It is the duty of every civil 
minded person to do all he can do 
to promote aviation for future wars 
will be fought in the air and the 
victor will be the nation who has 
the best air force. 

Will all persons who are inter- 
ested in aviation and are interested 
in joining the Civil Air Patrol, the 
minimum age 15 years, please 
get in touch with Second Lieu- 
tenant Henry A. Dellicker, Jr., 
telephone Winchester 0-0495 or 
Alvan G. Smith. Jr., Public Infor- 
mation Officer, telephone Winches- 
ter 6-1678. 



FRESHMEN DOW N CONCORD 
47-24 



The Winchester High Freshmen 
made it five straight for the sea- 
son with a convincing 47 - 24 vic- 
tory over the Concord Freshmen at 
Concord on Monday afternoon. This 
marks the fifth different school 
that the Red and Black Freshmen 
have defeated as they have not yet 
played a return game with any op- 
ponent. Dave Pratt and "Moose" 
Bellino shared scoring honors for 
the locals with 11 points apiece 
while "Bud" McKinley turned in an 
excellent floor game. 

The Winchester Junior High was 
edged by the Concord Junior High 
by a score of 18 - 17 in a low-scor- 
ing contest. The present Junior 
High quintet lacks the scoring 
punch of its two predecessors and 
the boys need a great deal of shoot- 
ing practice to improve their 
marksmanship. 

The summary: 

Winchester Freshmen 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



Dilorio, If 




f 


pts. 


3 


1 


7 


McDonnugh. If 


1 


1 


I 


Rionlan. rf 


2 


2 


| 


O'Brien, rf 


1 


0 


2 


Becker, rf 


0 


0 


0 


Pratt, c 


5 


1 


11 

a 


McKinley, c 


1 


1 


Bellino, lg 


5 


1 


n 


Kutler. lg 


0 


0 


0 


Perkins, rg 


0 


0 


0 


Lindsey, rg 


1 


0 


1 


Totals 


19 




45 


Concord Frenhmen 








g 


f 


pts. 


Oullinane. If 


1 


1 


3 


Alexander, rf 


2 


1 


5 


Horeson. rf 


0 


t 


1 


McHugh, c 


rt 


0 


12 


Mum-huso, c 


ti 


0 


0 


Doriixa, lg 


0 


3 


a 


Conean, lg 


s 


0 


0 


Barttua, rg 


0 


0 


0 


Totals 


9 


6 


24 



The Heating Fund Campaign to 
raise $25,000 for revamping and 
improving the heating system at 
the Parish of the Epiphany was 
officially launched last Wednesday 
evening at the annual meeting of 
the parish. Describing the serious 
need for this work and urging the 
generous support of all parish 
members were Mr. Francis E. 
Booth, Heating Committee Chair- 
man, Mr. II. P. Richardson, Mr. 
Albert S. Crockett, and Mr. Harlow 
Russell, Campaign chairman, all of 
whom were speakers at the meet- 
ing. It was explained that volun- 
teer solicitors will make calls for 
pledges from now until February 
24th when it is hoped that the fund 
will be well "over the top." 

Assisting Mr. Russell are the fol- 
lowing committee members: 

Assistant chairman, Ralph T. 
Jope. 

Vice-chairmen, Mrs. George A. 
Marks and Admiral William H. 
Buracker. 

Financial Secretary, Henry E. 
Moffette. 

Campaign Secretary, Mrs. Fred 
E. A. Smith assisted by Mrs. Neil 
H. Borden, 

Publicity, Mrs. Benjamin T. Mar- 
shall, Jr. 

Clubs & Organization Chairman, 
Gerald Y. Hills. 

Leadership Gifts, H. P. Richard- 
son assisted by Harrison Chadwick. 

Special Gifts, Mr. and Mrs. Al- 
bert S. Crockett. 

General Gifts, Mrs. Arthur T. 
Hertig, assisted by Mrs. J. Warren 
Shoemaker and Mrs. E. Phillips 
Walker. 

A seminar, "Cold Facts to Make 
Your Prospect Warm Up", was 
conducted for the solicitors last 
Sunday evening by Ralph T. Jope 
at the parish house, at which time 
explanation and instructions were 
given to those volunteering in this 
fund raising campaign. Coffee 
was served before the meeting 
with Mrs. Dwight W. Hadley and 
Mrs. J. Warren Shoemaker serving 
as pourers. 

"Come and See" Tours will be 
at 3 p. m. and all are urged to see 
for themselves the entire present 
heating plant. 



GUILD OF THE INFANT 
SAVIOUR 



PEG S COFFEE 



AND 



DOUGHNUT SHOP 



WE ARE NOW SELLING BORDEN S 
ICE CREAM 

Special (or Friday and Saturday only 

Lady Borden pints 41c 
Honey Dip Doughnuts 55c doz. 

Special for Monday 

Individual Chicken Pies 40ceach 



5 COMMON ST. 



Wl 6-2287 



The following residents of this 
town attended the winter meeting 
of the Bay State Historical League 
last Saturday at Boston University. 
Miss Louise Bancroft, Miss Clara 
Russell, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall W. 
Symmes, Miss Eleanor Bancroft, 
and Mrs. T. T. Greenwood. After 
the meeting tea was served in the 
school of theology. 



Members of the Guild met on 
Tuesday, January 23, at their new 
quarters in Masonic Hall. Mrs. 
John Lennon president, opened the 
meeting promptly at 2 o'clock and 
welcomed new and old members. 

After a short business meeting, 
the afternoon was turned over to 
moving pictures sponsored by the 
National Foundation for Infantile 
Paralysis. In the absence of Mrs. 
Carleton, Mrs. Herrick made an 
appeal in behalf of the March of 
Dimes campaign. "Operation Porch- 
light" will be conducted on Wed- 
nesday, January 31, between 8 and 
9 p. m. 

At our next meeting on Tuesday, 
February 13, a dessert bridge will 
be held at Masonic Hall. Chairman 
Mrs. Chester Powers and her com- 
mittee are endeavoring to make 
this annual Valentine Bridge an 
enjoyable and successful event. 

We were glad to welcome back 
Mrs. James Carr and Mrs. Wallace 
Fisher both of whom have been on 
the sick list. Mrs. Fisher gave a 
, report on sewing which was most 
satisfactory, 

A delightful tea and coffee hour 
served by Mrs. William Buckley 
and her committee was enjoyed at 
the close of the meeting. Hostess- 
es of the day were: Mrs. Allan 
Beausang, Mrs. John Colgate and 
' Mrs. Katherine Doyle. 

Do plan to come and bring your 
friends to the Valentine Dessert 
Bridge on Tuesday, February 13 at 
1 o'clock. Many beautiful prizes 
will be awarded. 

MYSTIC GLEE CLLB 

The Mystic Glee Club of Win- 
chester has resumed activities after 
a post-Christmas recess which pro- 
vided a welcome rest for the mem- 
bers following a very full December 
schedule. During December, the 
Club presented concerts at the 
Hobbs Junior High School in Med- 
ford, at the Copley Plaza Hotel for 
The Luncheon Club, The Winches- 
ter Old People's Home, as well as 
the annual winter concert for the 
Sponsoring Members. There was 
also the Club Christmas Party, and 
the annual New Year's Day Con- 
cert for the Winchester Masonic 
Organizations. 

Rehearsals are now resumed in 
preparation for the Spring Concert. 
Due to prior commitments, the date 
for the Concert has been changed 
to Friday. May 4, 1951. Sponsor- 
ing Members and others interested, 
please note this date change on the 
calendars 




CUT UP POULTRY 

FRESH ROASTERS 
- SPECIAL - 



THl KSDAY AM) FKlim 



SATURDAY 



clam chowder baked beans 

Monday and Tuesday 

CHICKEN SOIP 
All our cooked foods are prepared in our own farm kitchen. 

SHAKER GLEN FARM 

8 Thompson Street Winchester 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
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♦ 

» 
♦ 
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♦ ♦ 



Fathers' Night, the January 
meeting of the Mystic School Chap- 
ter of the Winchester Mothers' As- 
sociation, was held in the Mystic 
School Auditorium on Tuesday. 
January 23rd at 7:30 p. m. and was 
unusually well attended. Mrs. 
Melvin Sears, President, opened the 
meeting with a welcome to the par- 
ents. After a few brief announce- 
ments, she turned the meeting over 
to Miss Gladys Wood and the pupils 
of the 3rd. 4th. 5th, and 6th grades, 
who gave a most interesting enter- 
tainment. 

"Keep To The Iiight." the open- 
ing number, was a Song of Safety- 
sung by a group of boys and girls 
from Miss Jurgenson's 4th (hade. 
Those participating were Reginald 
Bradlee. Peter Bryant, Paula Col- 
colough, Nancy ( lark. Joanne Cox, 
Diane Fulgoni, Judith Ghirardini. 
Henry Kiley, Oliver Peterson and 
Donna Violante. 

"Ice Skating is Nice Skating" 
was another Song of Safety sung by 
a group of boys and girls from 
Miss Woodell's 4th Grade. On the 
stage for this number were Susan 
Blagden, David Connor, Danny Den- 
nett. Jean Gross, Jane Kaknes. 
Jackie Keane, Janet MeNeilly, 
Terry Mulford, Richard Sears and 
Betty Swisher. 

"King Safety's Court," a play in 
two acts, was presented next*. It 
provided the fathers, who generally 
cannot attend the regular as- 
semblies, with an excellent concep- 
tion of the type of program in 
which their children participate 
throuoghout the school year. Su- 
zanne Goodwin announced that the 
Kingdom of India-No-Place was 
gravely concerned because its pop- 
ulation was rapidly decreasing. 
There were so many accidents that 
Court was being held to prosecute 
the traffic violators with the King, 
Harry Preble, ready to pronounce 
sentence on each law breaker. With 
a blast on his trumpet, the Herald. 
Warren Fowler, proclaimed the 
opening of Court. The three 
courtiers, Vivianne Loustaunau. 
Cynthia Dunn and Kathleen 
Doherty made ready to bring any 

offenders before the King. Three 
traffic-law violators who had been 

! found playing in Madison avenue 
were summoned first: Clark Chand- 

■ ler, David Grant and James Towle. 

' With plenty of playgrounds and 
empty lots in which to play, no 
excuse was found for them! and 
they were given ten days in which 
to learn the ten rules of Safety. 

| The next offender was a jay- 
walker, Algernon, played by Rich- 
ard Niles. He was simply too tired 

i to walk to the corner, and to cure 
his laziness he was sentenced to 
ten days in bed. A girl, Margaret 

jO'Leary, was accused of just the 
opposite offense: she was always 
running! She was found running 
everywhere, especially in the street, 
but as this was her first offense, 
she was excused. Billy, Gardner 
Gray, had disobeyed the Traffic Of- 
ficer and he was ordered to treat 
the officer with respect and kind- 
ness for nine days, and to come 
back on the tenth day with a note 
from the officer to prove that he 
had fulfilled his sentence. John, 
played by Frederick Tilton, did 
not stop his bicycle when the Traf- 
fic Officer ordered him too, and so 
he lost the use of the bicycle for 
ten days. 

Ten days later, in the second act, 
i the Court reconvened. Algernon 
j piomised that he would never cross 
I in the middle of the block again. 
;and neither would his mother: The 
i other violators repeated the ten 
traffic rules, and the King said 
that he hoped to make good citizens 
out of them after all. On their 
next offense he threatened them 
with the dungeon (for life) and 
admonished them all to be good. 
At this point Jack Ghirardini. the 
Stage Manager, drew the final cur- 
tain. 

Choral Speaking is used often at 
School Assemblies. Tuesday even- 
ing's program ended with a varied 
selection spoken by a Choir of the 
following 6th Grade pupils, under 
the direction of Mrs. Velma Thomp- 
son: Kenneth Brown, Judith 
Dalrymple, Judith Dellickeiyry 
Dalrymple, Judith Dellicker, 
Cynthia Dennett, Warren Fowler, 
Jean Heard, Jacqueline Hogan. 
Mary Laird, Carol Leverone, David 
Manning, Regina Mingolelli, Ellen 
Money, Charles Myers, John Pres- 
ton, Bradley Ross, Gail Simonds, 
Peter Swazey, Frances Swisher, 
Mona Swonger, David Usher and 
George Wilkinson. 

The familiar but even beautiful 
Twenty Third Psalm was the first 
selection spoken by the Choir. Five 
Plump Peas was an amusing selec- 
tion with a surprise ending: while 
the words in Spin, Lassie. Spin 
whirred like a veritable spinning 
wheel. The "Chewy" child 
w a s another amusing piece, 
and it was followed by The 
Icicle, which cried itself' away. 
The House That Jack Built 
was enthusiastically received: it 
was spoken in a very sprightly 
manner with an especial emphasis 
on the chorus. Following this at a 
slow tempo was The Man in the 
Moon, and two short animal skits. 
The Cat Tale and The Frog. In the 
last piece. The Pirate Don Durk of 
Dowdee, the boys and girls alter- 
nated on some of the descriptive 
parts and then spoke together for 
greater emphasis. This piece also 
proved itself a favorite with the 
audience. 

The enthusiastic applause 
throughout the evening indicated 
the parents' appreciation to Miss 
Lillian Salice. Mrs. Velma Thomp- 
son and Miss Gladys Wood for an 
excellent program. 

At the close of the meeting, Mrs. 
Sears cordially invited everyone to 
adjourn to the Kindergarten Rooms 
for refreshments. In Miss 
Dogherty's Room the children were 
served by Mrs. Nelson Brown, who 
was assisted by Mrs. Aldrich For- 
ward and Mrs. George Niles. 
French chocolate was served to the 
parents in Mrs. Matson's room by- 
Mrs. Lindsay Caldwell, Chairman, 
assisted by Mrs. Richard Carens 
and Mrs. Harmon Hall. At the at- 
tractively decorated table, the 
pourers were Mrs. Richard Bolster 




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Winchester National 



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BANK 

WINCHESTER .MASSACHUSETTS 



MIMH* r«D«RAL DtPOBIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Banking Hours 8:00 A. M. to 2:00 P. M. Daily 
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MORE ON SCHOOLS 



January 23. 1951 
Kditor of the Star: 

On January 5, 1951. a letter was 
published in your paper, written by 
me, on the proposed Secondary 
School plan. I probably do not 
need to say that I have received 
phone calls both praising and criti- 
cizing this letter. It was brought 
! somewhat forcibly to my attention 
by one member of the school com- 
mittee that this is being used as 
a basis for a whispering campaign 
to discredit the Secondary School 
Planning Committee. It was de- 
finitely not my intention to make 
any charges or accusations against 
the integrity of this or any other 
committee either individually or 
collectively. I felt that my letter 
was sufficiently objective and im- 
personal so that no person or per- 
sons need take offense: after a 
careful rereading. I still feel so. If 
its wording has made it possible for 
a subjective and personal inter- 
pretation, it is a source of regret to 
me, particularly if it is true that 
; it is being used for nefarious pur- 
poses. To the best of my knowl- 
edge and belief, the motives and ac- 
tivities of the many people and 
committees which have worked on 
this project are as pure and white 
,as the driven snow, and I certainly 
do not want to be represented as 
having evidence, direct or cir- 
cumstantial, or even a suspicion of 
chicanery, perfidy, or foul play. 1 
detest smear campaigns, and :f 
such is underway, 1 am very sorry 
that my name is connected with it 
in any way. I re-emphasize the fact 
that I am advised of this by one 
who feels affected by its implica- 
tions. 

The opponents of the approved 
plan have been asked to state some- 
thing to take its place, to speak up 
in meetings, forums, etc. Many of 
us are not too adept at public speak- 
nir. and are especially hesitant 
about facing a semi-hostile audi- 
ence. Strictly as an individual, un- 
inspired by any group whatever. I 
would like to express my own feel- 
ings on this project. 

I believe Winchester can and 
should build a new, thoroughly 
modern school instead of remodel- 
ing a building, the style of which 
has been outmoded. I cannot share 
the confidence expressed by the 
committee that this school will be 
pleasing to the eye or efficient in 
its appointments, and I am sincere, 
ly concerned in my feeling that the 
town will regret this step in years 
to come. Once the money is spent 
on this project, ;t will be impossible 
to undo it. 

I believe that the new school 
should be a three-year Senior High 
School, with an auditorium large 
enough to serve its student body 
and the needs of the town as a 
whole. The reasons for this are: 
i a i the younger students would 
have something wonderful ahead 
of them all the time, Ibi the last 
years in the home town school 
would be the most glorious of all, 
and (c) it seems to me that this 
age-group would derive the most 
direct benefits from modern con- 
struction and equipment. Further- 
more, the limitations on the loca- 
tion of a Junior High School might 
not apply to a Senior High, as oldei 
students would be less affected by 
walking a few extra blocks, and aie 
more adept at avoiding traffic haz- 
ards. 

Instead of abandoning the pres- 
ent Senior High School, I would 
proceed with the renovations plan- 
ned, bringing it to a point as up- 
to-date as possible, and let the three 
Junior High Classes share this and 
the present Junior High School 
with no additions to either school. 



A traffic tunnel under Main street 
for the students to use in passing 
between buildings would help to 
eliminate any "car meets children" 
casualties. The space made avail- 
abb- in this way should certainly 
meet the needs of these grades. 

I believe the location of the new 
school should be decided by the 
Town Meeting after a factual and 
objective analysis of all sites avail- 
able. This point I bring out be- 
cause of the comments I have re- 
ceived by phone in which the use of 
the Skillings Property was ad- 
vocated. 1 personally like t h e 
Palmer street site and think the 
Committee presented excellent rea- 
sons for its selection. However, if 
most of the people want to have the 
school on the former ground, it 
should be given every possible con- 
sideration, and disadvantages eith- 
er overlooked or sold to the people 
in such a strong way that no one 
would have the nerve to bring it up 
again. 

Last of all. I believe that the 
questions of additions to elemen- 
tary schools should be settled im- 
mediately, and the work carried 
on simultaneously with the pro- 
jected secondary school work, re- 
gardless of the order in which these 
projects were presented in the 1047. 
1948 and 1949 town reports. The 
need is obvious and urgent, and we 
should face the issue like men. not 
mice, and do whatever is needed to 
provide an adequate and efficient 
school plant for our children. 1 am 
a taxpayer, not a tenant, and would 
lie hit just as hard as anyone, rela- 
tively speaking, but I am 10(1'; for 
giving our children the best educa- 
tional facilities possible, as this is 
'he best investment we can make in 
the future of America. 

If this long letter is printed. I 
foresee a phone call Friday evening 
to the effect that my plan was al- 
ready discussed and rejected. I 
should like to ask in advance, "Re- 
jected by whom, and how many of 
them?" Much has been made of the 
overwhelming vote for the pro- 
nosed remodel inn plan at the last 
special Town Meeting, and also of 
the fact a majority of those voting 
in the referendum favored this plan. 
I would ask, "What other choice did 
they have?" A victory for any- 
thing is achieved only when -some- 
thing equally good is rejected 
simultaneously; a "yes" vote when 
it is a case of "accept or reject" the 
only feasible solution presented is 
sort of a hollow victory. The Pre- 
ferred Plan was deemed too costly 
before tt was brought to a vote, 
and the Foster Plan raised prob- 
lems beyond the scope of the Town 
Meeting. I feel that the affirma- 
tive vote might have been born of 
desperation! The person who called 
us urging us to vote affirmatively 
told us that a "no" vote would mean 
no schools at all. Tins -ounds a 
bit desperate! 

In conclusion, the acceptance of 
the Alternate Plan as proposed re- 
minds me of a woman shopping for 
a dress. She buys a $14.95 model 
which she does not particularly 
like, passing up a $19.95 dress 
which she adores, and then com- 
plains that she doesn't have any- 
thing decent to wear! 

Very truly yours, 
Edwin B. Marshall 
173 Forest street 



CONTAGIOUS D I SEA S ES 

The following list cases of Con- 
tagious Diseases was reported to 
the Board of Health for week end- 
ing, Thursday, January 25: 
Mumps 2 
Scarlet Fever ] 
German Measles 1 
William B. MacDonaid 
Agent, Board of Health 



6 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 26. 1951 



The Winchester Star 

fK>tiibli,hed 1**0) 
STAK BllLDING 
3 CHI K< II STREET 
WINCHESTER. MASS. 
Theodore I'. W ilson 
Kdi>or and Publisher 
Published Kxery Friday 

sTnTTle ( oimt:s. ten cents 

Left at Your Ite-idence for 1 Year 
The Winchester Star. S2.">0 in 
\d \ a nee. 

Ne»> Items, Lodge Meetincs. So- 
ciety Events, I'er-ionals, etc., sent 
to this office be welcomed by 

the Editor. 

Knr«'ri'*l Ht the |K*fttfiffiee at Win:hti»ter ( 
M;is-.. secoiuUeltMtH matter. 

The Winchester Star assume-, no 
financial responsibility for typo- 
graphical error-, in advertisements 
but «ill publish without charge a 
correction in the next issue, or re- 
publish that portion of the adver- 
tisement which is incorrect. 

Telephone Winchester fi-0029 




I'OLICE OFFICER MIT BY 
TRICK 



DOG AIDED INJl'RED WOMAN 



While dointr traffic duty at Main 
and Thompson street Wednesday 
night, police officer Alfred W. 
Toole of Middlesex street was hit 
by a passing truck at 5:30. He 
was knocked to the street by the 
impart and was taken to the office 
of Dr. Harry L. Benson in a Win- 
chester Provision Company truck. 
After examination he was taken to 
his home. The truck was proceed- 
ing slowly and the office! was 
■(truck on the leg. No hones were 
broken hut he was hadlv bruised. 



DH s >: M.l'H h wu.OW 

FORI M OBSERVES 
INTERNATIONAL WEEK-END 



For the third successive year, 
the Senior Forum, High School 
! youth group of the First Congre- 
gational Church, will observe In- 
ternational Week-End when 50 
■ foreign students will be guests in 
the homes of Forum members. The 
vruests will be met at the Inter- 
national Student Center in Cam- 
bridge on Saturday afternoon and 
; brought to the homes of their hos- 
: tess. 

At 6:15, all Forum members and 
\ their adult advisers will enjoy a 
delicious supper with the foreign 
tudents who are visiting us. The 
..upper is being served by Judy 
Representing Winchester J |, ampr ey and Janet Macaulay as 

i sistcd by Mis. F. Duane Hawkins, 



Only Newspaper 
Printed In Winchester 

Serving the Community for 
70 Years 



Largest 



>orn Circulation 



• 



Senators in Congress 

Leverett Saltonstall 
j Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. 

I Congressman. 5th District 

j Edith Nourse Rogers 

i Senator 6th Middlesex 
District 

• Robert I', i 'ampbell 

Representative in General 
I Court 

f Harrison ( 'hadvviek 

j County Commissioner 

) James A. Cullen 

FROM A FATHER OF 
CHILDREN 



Mrs. Theod 
James H. < 
Zimmerman, 
chairman of 
mittee who 



Editor of the Star: 

As a father of children about to 
enter High School, I would like to 
make a direct appeal to those who 
are holding up the Junior and Se- 
nior High School Building pro- 
gram. 

If they will only stop to think, 
they will realize that their actions 
are going to result in only one 
solution to the problem; namely a 
two session Junior and two session 
Senior High School. I think every- 
body can visualize the unhappy re- 
sults to parents, students and 
teachers, when an educational sys- 
tem that is built up for one session 
is forced because of overcrowding, 
into either two daily sessions or one 
day session and one night session. 

But there will be no alternative 
to this chaotic condition unless 
more space is provided and a start 
made right away. 

There are some on the Referen- 
dum Committee who have already 
sent their children through the 
Winchester High School under ideal 
classroom conditions. Is it fair 
that they should now oppose others 
when they seek decent educational 
facilities for theii children? 

At the Representative Town 
Meeting to be held this coming 
Monday night, I hope the group 
opposing the plans ,,f the Build- 
ing Committee will bring all theii 
peeves out in the open. 

1 am informed that the Building 
Committee has changed the color 
of the brick and I am sure they 
have outlined workshop facilities, 
so that all can see their location 
and size. 

1 wouldn't doubt but they will 
have the exits to the gymnasium 
carefully marked out on the plans 
with big black or red crayons so 
that these various methods of re- 
treat can be noted by even those 
unfamiliar with building plans. 

1 would like to repeat again: an 
appointment of a new committee 
or other delays will bring onlv one 
result in 11*5:: and that is 'mass 
production education 1 >r our child- 
ren. Their curriculum will be 
doled or rationed out to them in 
piecemeal on a two or three shift 
basis. 

Please let's have all the gripes 
and suggestions, constructive or 
otherwise, out on the Moor of the 
town meeting and then let's abide 
by the decision of the meeting with- 
out a costly referendum campaign. 
These referendums always result 
in a series of misrepresentations, 
personal abuses and other kinds of 
evil. 

Representative government m 
Winchester seems to be a truet 
form of democracy than the or. 
ganized vote getting pressures of 
a minority out to kill the will of 
the majority. 

Again, Mi. Editor, it is neithet 
tair nor right to put our youngsters 
in Winchester's Secondary Schools 
on a shift basis, but if you stud\ 
the mathematics of the coming 
school population, that's what we 
are headed for unless there can be 
a true agreement when the meet- 
ing adjourns Monday night 

Daniel E. Barnard 
< ; Indian Hill r< >;ui 



at the door with a name tag. Sing- 
ing will be led by Dorothy Brandt 
and the Forum orchestra will fur- 
nish background music during the 
suppei undei the leadership ol 
Scott Cunningham. David Archi- 
bald, President of the Forum, will 
preside at the festivities following 
the supper. Greetings will be 
brought by Dr. Howard .1. Chidley, 
The highlight of the evening 
will be an address by Dr. S. Ralph 
Harlow, Professor of Religion at 
Smith College, on "What Do We 
Mean by One World?" and fun and 
fellowship to get acquainted with 
our guests. 

On Sunday the visitors will at- 
; tend the morning church service at 
10:45, when National Youth Sun- 
day will be observed. Dr. Howard 
[J, Chidley will preach a special 
sermon, "The Religion Needed To- 
day." David Archibald, President 
of the Forum, Cordon Bird, Jr., 
Treasurer, Donald Cameron, Chair- 
man of the Worship Committee, 
jand David Snow, Chairman of 
j Forum Flashes, will have parts in 
the service. The Forum choir un- 
. del the direction of Dorothy Brandt 
I will sing two anthems, "A Song of 
i Peace," by Sibelius, and "One 
i World," by O'Hara. Ushers for the 
j service will be Douglas Hawkins, 
John Atkinson, Peter Coon, Andrew 
Robertson, Curtis Ryan, and Carle 
Zimmerman. The offering will be 
received by Robert Traut, Scott 
Cunningham, George DeCamp, 
Robert Gaffney, I.angdon Smith, 
and Edward Tan. 

Sunday at 4:00, an International 
Tea will be held in the small Social 
Hall of the chinch to which all 
Forum members, their adult advis- 
ors, and all Interested adults arc 
cordially invited. Barbara Kaknes 
i- hospitality chairman for the 
afternoon and will pin a flower on 
each foreign student. The arrange- 
intents for the t'':t are being made 
by Carolyn Stone, Coralyn Whit- 
ing, and Carol Chaves assisted by 
Mrs. Gordon Bird 

The plans for International 
Week-End have been made by the 
Race Relations Committee under 
the chairmanship of Richard Phip- 
pen and Judith Harmon. 

Following the tea, the visitors 
; will be transported to the Inter- 
national Student Center and Fo- 
rum's third International Week- 
End will come to a close. The 
Forum is looking forward to an 
interesting experience in inter- 
national understanding and good 
will. 

WILLING ELECTED 



James B. Willing, 16 Ledyard 
road, has been elected Vice-Pres- 
ident, and Chairman of the Meet- 
ings Committee and a member of 
the Executive Committee for the 
Massachusetts Society of Certified 
Public Accountants, according to 
an announcement by Richard S. 
Chamberlain, President of that or- 
ganization. 

In addition to his activity in the 
Massachusetts Society, which he 
has served as Secretary, Auditor 
and Executive Committee member. 
Mr. Willing is also a member of 
the American Institute of Accoun- 
tants, and the Boston Chapter-Na- 
tional Association of Cost Ac- 
countants. 

He has long been interested in 
civic affairs and is currently Tteas- 
urer of the Winchester (Jill Scouts 
Building Fund and is a member 
of the Advisory Committee for the 
Winchester Council, Girl Scouts. 



MR. LYBECK ELECTED 
NATIONAL COUNSELLOR 




A fine grand piano, previously- 
owned by the late Harold B. Bowne 
of Foxcroft road, has been pre- 
sented by Mr. Bowne 's family to 
William Parkman Lodge of Masons. 
Suitably marked it will be used in 
the Lodge looms Mr. Bowne was 
a member of William Parkman and 
for some years active in the lodge 



MRS. WINSNII' APPOINTED 



Mis. Walter W. Winship of l'.i 
Warren street has been appointed 
Vice Chairman of a dance spon- 
sored by the Women's Republican 
Club of Boston to be held at the 
( lub, 46 Beacon street, Boston on 
January 27. from S p. m. to 12 
midnight. 

Patronesses from Winchester in- 
clude: Mis. William C. Cusack of 
2 Lakeview road and Mrs. Frank 
II. Knight of 55 Mystic Valley 
Parkway. 

Mr. Norton Demsey, Guidance 
Counselor, foi Winchester High 
School was \isited by W. David 
Crockett, Director of Admissions, 
Emerson College. Boston on Wed- 
nesday the 24th of January. Mr. 
Crockett discussed educational op- 
portunities in the fields of speech, 
drama, broadcasting, and speech 
therapy with the school official. 



ore Atkinson, Mrs. 
oon, and Mrs. Carle 
Dona Macaulay i- 
the hospitality com- 
vill meet each person 



Up at George Murray's house at 
188 Highland avenue, Bruce, a big 
German police dog, can have about 
anything he wants these days after 
the assistance he gave Mr. Mur- 
ray's mother, Mrs. Bessie Murray, 
following an accident which, befell 
her on Monday, January 8. 

Mts. Murray makes her home 
with her son, and was alone in the 
house during the afternoon while 
Mr. Murray was at bis cabinet- 
maker's shop on upper Main street. 
She had a washing out at the rear 
of the house and about •'! o'clock 
noticed that a sheet had become 
tangled on the line. Without put- 
ting on a wrap. Mrs. Murray went 
out on tin 1 back porch to free the 
sheet. 

Getting outdoor. , she slipped on 
a small icy place on the porch, 
which had been cleared of the 
heavy snow that fell the day pre- 
vious, and being unable to save 
herself, fell heavily to the porch, 
breaking her right leg near the 
hip. She found it impossible to 
move, and besides- the pain of her 
injury, was being exposed to the 
intense cold of the afternoon. No 
one heard her cries for assistance, 
and it is probable that serious con- 
sequences would have resulted 
from the exposure to which Mis. 
Murray was being subjected if it 
had not been for Bruce. 

The big HO pound police dog is, 
according to his master, no parti- 
cular lover of the ladies, but he is 
apparently able to detect when one 
is in need of his services. 



Fortunately Bruce was in the 
house at the time of Mrs. Murray's 
accident, and hearing her cries 
through the door, which had been 
left open, he quickly went out to 
see what was wrong. After 
crouching down beside Mis. Mur- 
ray and licking her face, he decided 
something more than that was 
needed, and commenced to try to 
drag her toward the house by the 
shoulders of her dress. 

The cloth tore, but Bruce's ac- 
tion gave Mrs. Murray an idea, 
and calling the big dog around in 
front of her, the injured woman 
got a firm grip on his collar, then 
directing the dog to go into the 
house. 

Little by little the 80 pound dog 
dragged the 150 pound woman 
across the porch, through the door- 
way and into the kitchen, his toe- 
nails digging deep scratches in the 
tile Homing from his exertion. 

Once in the kitchen, Mrs. Mur- 
ray succeeded in closing the door 
and shutting out the cold that was 
rapidly taking its toll of her 
strength. Half an hour was con- 
sumed in getting her into the 
house, and Mrs. Murray remained 
lying on the kitchen floor from half 
past three until after five o'clock 
when Iter son returned home from 
work. 

Mr. Murray quickly called the 
Police and his mother was removed 
to the Winchester Hospital where 
her injury was treated by Dr. 
Alexander I*. Aitken. She is re- 
ported as getting along nicely and 
expected home by the end of the 
week. 

Bruce, the hero of the story, 



formerly belonged to the Bernard 
Rahillys who were neighbors of the 
Murray's before leaving town not 
long ago. Even before the Ra- 
hillys moved, the big dog was j 
spending practically all of his time 
at the Murray home, and when his 
owners left Winchester, they gave 
the dog to Mr. Murray, foi whom 
he had apparently formed a deep 
attraction As for Mi. Murray, 
well, — he thinks Bruce is all 
right, too. or at least that was the 
impression the Star reporter got as 
he talked with him about the dog! 

Mr. and Mis. Francis P. Farley 
of 8 Squanto road announce the 
birth of twin boys, John Peter and 
James Paul, born December 12 at 
the Winchester Hospital. Grand- 
parent honors are shared by Mr. 
and Mrs. George F. Mahr of Fram- 
ingham ..nd Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
J. Farley of Indian Hill road. 



Mr. Elliott F. Cameron of Church 
street returned home last week 
from the Winchester Hospital 
where he had been held for several 
weeks suffering from a heart at- 
tac!;. Ib' :• reported improving 



flTZGdMlD'fWl UlPi 



IT MAKES US WEEP 
WHEN WE BEHOLD, 
A MOUSE THAT SHIVERS 
WITH THE COLD/ 



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Robert F. l.ybeck of >» Everell ! 
mad, Aviation Representative of 
tk, New England Divison of Esso 
Standard Oil Company, was elected 
a National Counsellor of the So- 
ciety of Automotive Engineers at . 
its annual meeting recently held 
in Detroit. 

The choice id' a New England 
man for this important position is 
especially significant in view of the 
fact that only once before in the 
last 20 years have Boston and the 
New England Section been rep- 
resented upon the National Society 
of Automotive Engineers Council. 

Mr. Lybeck is well known in avia- 
tion circles in this area, being cur- 
lently President of the Aeronau- 
tical Association of Boston and a 
member of the Boston Chamber of 




ARLINGTON DYE WORKS CLEANSERS 
INVITES YOU TO ITS GRAND 

OUSEWARNING 

NEW PLANT STORE OPENS SATURDAY - JANUARY 27th 




Arlington Dye Works Cleansers is 
proud to announce the opening of 
its new plant store located at 81 
Mystic Street, Arlington — just 
a few steps from Arlington center. 
In keeping with its policy of offer- 
ing the best in cleansing service, 
Arlington Cleansers now features 
the finest in modern facilities. In- 
corporating the latest in architec- 
tural and interior design with 
many attractive innovations in- 
tended to please ... the new 
store will be open for your inspec- 
tion and convenience Saturday, 
January 27th at 9:00 A.M. 



Equipment 



'150 - GIFT 
AWARDS ! 

To celebrate our houseu arming we will 
award to customers during opening week 
gift certificates entitling the holder to 



Cleansing Methods 



one $50 

ONE 



LADIES' 
SPRING SUIT 



MEN'S 
SPRING SUIT 

(or the equivalent in cash, if you prefer) 

plus 10 Gift Awards 

OF $ 5 WORTH OF CLEANSING 
GARDENIAS FOR THE LADIES! 



Because we think you will be just u 
pleased as w e are with our new store, you 
are cordially invited to attend our Grand 

Housewarming! 

Over the past twenty-five years we hav« 
built our business on the basis of quality 
workmanship, fast service and the unfail- 
ing courtesy of our employees. In our 
new home we stand ready to serve you In 
this same tradition. Won't you drop in 
on January 27th, or anytime during tb* 
following week, and help us celebrate* 

Come and Bring 
Your Friends! 



A RLINGTON 

DYE WORKS CLEANSERS 

81 MYSTIC STREET 



Telephone AR 5-4600 



ARLINGTON, MASS. 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, JANUARY 26. 1951 



7 



CLASSIFIED 

LOST AND FOUND 



LOST Red tricycle, lt»-ail»tr«m with 
chain dri.e. \h»i seen un Cabot utrect ; bc- 
tivii-n Christmas and New Year's. TV I. 
Tel Wl 



Cultured jS* 



erviced 



SUNDAY, JANUARY IS. I Ml 



FOR SALE 



IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
CATHOLIC CHURCH 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 



FOR SALE liMO Packard - one 

owner - ex< <?llrn'. condition. Phone after i; 
P M WI I -2976 

FOR SALE Brook* Brothers chester- 
field overcoat, ttfze 44. r. .■•.>■! worn. Original 
price lllf Will sell foi $75, Tel. Wl 6- 
085 1 

FOR SALE Old model GE refrigerate! 
in good running condition. Owt for ramp. 
KSO. Wl 6-] '.!.).. M 

FOR. SAI L Well seasoned fireplace 
wood mostly oak. liruzel'u Poultry Farm. 
Wu 'J.2:i'.<l - a-0452 jan!2-4t* 

FOR SALE — Rebuilt washing machine 
• no electric refrigerators, standard reliable 
makes only. (Jalun and Enckson Co.. Inc. 
44? Max-. Ave , Arlington. Tel. Aldington 

i-mti da-tf 



Rev, Herbert K. A. Driscoll. Pastor 
Rev. Stephen E, Hurke 

Ma-si-a at 7, S;45. 10 and ll :15. 



Corner Mt. Vernon and Washington 
■ streets. 

Rev, Walter Lee Bailey, Minister. 
Residence I I0 Fairiuount Street. Tele- 
phone Winchester 6-0427. 



THE LUTHERAN CHURCH OF 
THE REDEEMER 



Montvate Ave.. Woburn 



Rev. Ralph Hjelm, Pa-tor 
It.-s ll« Montvate Avenue 
i Tel. WO 2-:i077 



Morning Worship - ll 0> A. M. 
Church School - 9:45 A M 



FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST 
SCIENTIST, WINCHESTER 



W Lawrence Cook Organist and Director 
of Senior and Youth Choirs 

Mrs. Dana It. Perking, Soloist and 
Director of Junior Choir 

John Hunt Chappie. Youth Director 

Mrs. II. Stanley Kiniley, Church School 
Superintendent 

Church Office hour- : 

Tuesday nnd Wednesday mornings. 

Telephone Winchester 6-2864, At other 
time, call Mrs. L. E. Leavitt, WI 6-3062. 



FIREPLACE WOOD FOR SALE — 

Mostly oak. well seasoned, cut any length, 
delivered to cellar ; also kindling for aa.e. 
J. C. Walker. WAyland, US Ring 3. 



WANTED 

WANTED Mn Idle aged man want, 

work doing general house c. caning. By the 
hour or day. Window nnd paint Washing, 
and inside painting Floor waxing. Also can 
cook. Call William Coney, AR 5-7425-W • 

WANTED Russell .1 Taylor, well 

known Winchester puperhanger and inside 
painter wishes to add some new customers 

this list. For expert workmanship ca.l 
I ti-OST-.'-W. janla-2t» 



Sunday Services at 1 1 a. m 
Sunday School is held at the game hour 
as the church service. 

Wednesday testimonial meeting 8 p. m. 
Heading room, 5 Winchester Terrace 
j 'off Thompson Street i. Open daily ex- 
»eptS-ti cept Sunduys and holidays from 11 a. m. 
10 4 p. ni. 



Antiques Wanted 

Call Mr. Reebenacker 

A Reliable Dealer 
REading 2-1991 

sept29-tf 



MISCELLANEOUS 



DOMESTIC 

iomeutic help. 
Home S,u vice ST li-1407-M. 



EXCHANGE OF SERVICES Would 
lovingly accompany elderly person or child 
to Florida. Or drive, or assist in driving to 
Florida ir. exchange for trip down. Leaving 
about Feb. It. Tel. Mrs. Alice Miller, am 
evening WI 6-0X48- R. * 
HELP Vul or part time 
Nurses' Registry. Dennisoti 
jan !2-4t* 

" SAGCINt; SPRINOS In upholstered 
furniture gents repaired and completely 
restored to original position with SAO 
PRUa' Work done in your home. Divan 
• 20.76 ; chair, S9.75. Written Lifetime 
guarantee. Quality Upholstering aince 
1901. R. L. Wicks & Sons Co. Call 
RKL 6-0991 jy9-t f 

"UPHOLSTERING * CANE SEATING— 
For expert work of all kinds. Call Miss 
Davis, Wl 6-0516-M I formerly Hobby & 
Craft Nook) or B & S Upholstery Co. ARI. 
6-1818 ja6-tf 

HELP — F*or the Problem Drinker 1 
There is a way outl Alcoholics Anonymous 
■can show you I Write P. O. Box 168. Win- 
cheater. ja20-tf 

TRAVEL INFORMATION — For reser- 
vations on Airplane*. Ships, Trains, and 
at Hotels anywhere in the United States 
or foreign countries. Call your Author- 
Ued Travel Agent, J. F. McOrath. Jr.. 
Travel Service. WOburn 2-1234 or Wln- 
chester 6-8180. nl9-tf 

WEDDING CAKES — When you want a 
real nice one, or a birthday cake that will 
thrill you, call a studio that makes a 
specialty of only the best in party cakes 
of any kind. Delivery can be made. Tel. 
Emile Marquis. 811 Central street, Woburn. 
WOburn 2-1773 f6-tf 



The nature of God as the great and only 
source of fundamental truth will be made 
clear at Chri-tian Science services next 
Sunday. The Lesson-Sermon is entitled 
"Truth. " 

The Golden Text is from one of David's 
psalms of praise: "I will praise thee. 
0 Lord, among the people: . for thy 
mercy is great above the heavens: and thy 
truth reaeheth unto the clouds" i Psalms 
108 ::t. 4 i. 

Readings from the Bible i King James 
Version, includes James 3:11, 12: "Doth a 
fountain send forth at the same time 
sweet water and bitter 1 ' Can the fig tree, 
my brethren, bear olive berries* either a 
vine, figs" so can no fountain both yield 
salt water and fresh." 

Correlative passages from "Science and 
Health with Key to the Scriptures" by- 
Mary Baker Eddy include: "In Science, 
Truth is divine, and the infinite God can 
have no unlikcness. Did God. Truth, create 

I error'.' No! 'Doth a fountain send forth at 
the same plaee sweet water and bitter"' 

! . . . The five material senses tesify to 
truth and error as united in a mind both 
good and evil. Their false evidence will 
finally yield to Truth. - - to the recognition 
of Spirit and of the .spiritual creation." 
|p, 2H7. 



CHURCH OK THE EPIPHANY 

Rev. Dwight W. Hadlev. Rector. Rec- 
tory. 3 Glrngsrry. Tel. Winchester 6-1264. 
Parish Home. Tel. Winchester 6-1922. 



Sunday, January 2S - Youth Sunday 

B 10 a. m. Men's Brotherhood 

9*30 a. m, Church School 

10:4", a. tn. Nursei y and Kindergarten 

10:1", a. rn. Morning Sanctuary Service 

Sermon by John Hunt Chappie "The chil- 
dren of Light and the Children of Daik- 
Oess." The young people will actively par- 
ticipate in the s.-ri ice Music by the Youth 
Choir. Presentation of Cross and Crown 
attendance awards and "God and Country" 
Scut awards. 

6;30 p m Youth Fellowship Theme: 
"We have this Life, what will we do with 
It!" Worship Service Conducted by Stuart 
Carlisle. Refreshments In charge of Donald 
MacFeeley and Sandra Saltmarsh. 

Monday. January 29 

7 :"ii p. m . Hoy Scut. Troop 7. in Re- 
creation Hnll 

Tuesday, January 30 

Wednesday, January l 

Mid-Winter Holly of Massachusetts Wom- 
en's Baptist Missionary Society in Termont 

Temple 

Thursday, February 1 

12:00 noon Women's League Luncheon 
at the home of Mr-. E. R. Garrison. 17 Nor- 
wood Street. The theme of the afternoon 
is "Rural Work." with the program in 
charge of Mrs. Forbes H. Norn's. Speaker: 
Mr Newton E. Woodbury. Field Secretary 
for Town and Country Work in Massa- 
chusetts. Devotions conducted l<\ Mrs 
Walter L. Bailey. 

«:4,'i p. m. Youth Choir Rehearsal 

7 p. m. Senior Choir Rehearsal 

Friday. February 2 

S:00 p. m. All-Church Social. Home 
talent - fun and hilarity. Refreshments. 
Everyone welcome! 



SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



Sunday. January 28 

8:00 a. m. Holy Communion 

9 :30 B. m. Church School. I Upper School i 

11 :00 a. m, Morning Prayer and Sermon 

11:00 a. m. Kindergarten and Primary 

Departments 
7 :t)i> p. m. Young Peoples' Fellowship 
Tuesday, January 30 
10:15 a. m. Holy Communion 
Sewing. Surgical Dressings. Church 

World Service 

12:110 p. m. Luncheon. 



Washington St nt Kenwin Rd. 
Rev. John William Cook. Minister 
16 Kenwin Road 
Tel. Wl fi-0750-W 
Church Study, WI 6-1688 
Mis. George Lochmun, Organist 



WINCHESTER UNITARIAN CHURCH 



Mygtic Valley Parkway and Main Street 



Robert A. Storer. Minister 
Mrs. Mary Ranton Witham, Director of 
Music and Organist 
Mrs Walter Smalley. Church Secretary. 
Church Telephone - Winchester 6-0949 



HELP WANTED 

WANTED Secretary for part time 

work in church office. Call Winchester 6- 
IH14P between 9 an, I 12 Monday through 
I riday. 

SECRETARY WANTED To handle 
general office work for engineering firm. 
5 ilay week Salary arranged. The Calidyne 
Co.. 7M Main St.. Winchester. Tel. WI 6- 



OFFICE WORK IN 
WINCHESTER 

Stenographer • Clerk 
wanted for Winchester 
Engineering Office. Apply 
in writing, P.O.Box 129. 
Winchester. 

» ti iK 



Sunday. January 28. 1951 
Youth Sundsy 

9:30 A. M. Upper School Worship Ser- 
vice - Meyer Chapel 

9:30 A. M. Junior Choir - Metcalf Union 
Room 

1100 A. M. Lower School - Lawrance 
Hall 

11 :00 A. M. Service of Worship conducted 
by the* Metcalf Union: 

8:00 P. M. Junior High Fellowship 

7 SOO P. M. Metcalf Union 

Monday. January 29th At 7 :<>0 P. M. 
Hoy Scouts 

Tuesday. January :trtth At 10:00 A. M. 
Sewing Meetinst 

Friday. February 2nd At 2:45 P. M. 
Motion Choir 



Sunday. January 28 

9:45 «. m. Church School. Mrs. Rons? 
Snyder, superintendent. Classes for ages 
3 to 23. 

11:00 a m. Morning Worship. Mr. Cook 
will preach. 

tl ::ii> p. m. The Youth Group will meet 
at the church. Round Carlson and Dora 
White will be in charge <>f the program. 
Activities for the Week: 

Tuesday. January 30 

8:00 p. m. The Music Committee will meet 
at the church. 

Thursday. February 1 

7:110 p. m The Chancel Choir will re- 
hearse at the chinch 

8:00 p. m. The Bible Study Group will 
meet at the church. All are invited to at- 
tend. 

Friday. February 2 

3:00 p. m. The Junior Choir will re- 
hearse at the church. (Note the change of 
time, i 

Coming Events: 

February 6. Bethany dessert and meet- 
ing. 

February 7, Ash Wednesday Hegining of 
Union Lenten Services. 

February 8, Adult Group. 

February 11, Boy Scout Sunday. 

February 15, Church and Prudential Com- 
mittees. 

February l'i - 18, Open House at the 
Pa rsonage. 



FOR THE BUSINESSMAN AND 
THE BUSINESSWOMAN 

In the Reference Room at the 
Public Library are many books 
and magazines which are of great 
value to businessmen. Some of 
these, we know, are well-known to 
you. Others,, perhaps, are less 
familiar hut might be just the 
answer to your particular need. We 
hope, therefore, that this selected, 
annotated list will remind you of 
the material available to you at 
your library or introduce you to 
some of 0U1 business reference 
material. 

Moody's Manual of Investments. 
American and Foreign 

Industrials 

Railroads 

Public Utilities 

Ranks, Insurance, Real Estate, 
Investment Trusts 

Information for the hanker and 
investor on the above subjects — 
one o f the most comprehensive 
sources available. 

Moody's Bond Survey 

Moody's Stock Survey 

Thomas' Register of American 
Manufacturers 

A national purchasing guide for 
American and foreign buyers in 
all lines of trade. Includes names of 
manufacturers, producers, impor- 
ters, and similar sources of supply. 

Directory of New England Manu- 
facturers 

Alphabetical list of New Eng- 
land manufacturing companies, 
also includes a product section 
and geographic section. 

Canadian Trade Index 

An authoritative directory of all 
products manufactured in Canada 
and the names of the firms mak- 
ing them. 

Beaton's Handbook 

Fulfills two purposes in that it 
hows Canada as a field for new- 
business and how business in 
Canada is done. 

Lasser's Business Tax Hand- 
book- 
Contains many ideas for running 
your business "taxwise" and a 
complete guide to business opera- 
tion and taxes. 

Kiplinger Letter 

Weekly letter from Washington 
of current events, directed especial- 
ly to businessmen. 

Wall Street Journal 

Magazines 

Business Week 

Time 

Exporters' Digest 

U. S. New and World Report 

Fortune 

Newsweek 



billion! Think what that sum would 
do if diverted to constructive, up- 
lifting purposes. It would pay the 
operating expenses of every univer- 
sity, college, and school in the 
country, making higher education 
free to all. It would wipe out all 
the city slums of the nation, es- 
tablish free medical centers, reduce 
poverty and crime, and lower taxes. 
It would scatter plenty "o'er a smil- 
ing land." 

Daniel C. Dennett, M. D. 

7 Washington street 



CEORGE WASHINGTON 
SCHOOL PROGRAM 



Library Activities 

Recorded music program for 
Wednesday, January 31 at 3 p. m. 
and again at 7:30 p. m. in the 
Downs Room: 

Peer Gynt Suite No. 1 - Grieg 
Concerto for Piano and Orches- 
tra No. 2 (Third movement! - 
Chopin 

Symphony No. 39 - Mozart 
Waltzes - Strauss 
Sonata No. 9 "Kreutzer" (First 
movement) - Beethoven 



The First and Second Combina- 
tion Grade -pupils of Mrs, Eleanor 
Wells presented an interesting pro- 
gram on Thursday, January l^th. 
Part I 
Presented by tirade I 
Announced by Jeffrey Mayo 
Parade of the Months 

The characters: 
January Le.-lie Sanger 

February Linda Dreyer 

March Jeffrey Mayo 

April Patricia Tofun 

May Paula DiPietro 

June Joanne Bravacs 

July Roy Wakefield 

August Dianne Watson 

September Ellen Rimbach 

October Johnnie Chane 

November Carol Coakley 

December Judith Towle 

The play used, as a topic, the old 
rhyme: "30 days has September, 
April, June and November, 31 have 
all the rest excepting February 
which has 28." 

Part II 

Presented by second grade in 
four parts, and announced by 
James Bogue, as follows: 

"Safety First" 

1. Coasting 

2. Skating 

3. "The Short-Cut" 

4. Safety First 
Those taking part were: 

Diane Gentile Susan Gleason 

Susan Yore Linda Senter 

Penny Da'Ziel George Neville 

Stephen Morison James Bogue 

Gerald Ducharme Scott Carver 

The costumes, left entirely to 
the pupils' imagination, were both 
original and amusing. All stage 
properties were provided in a like 
manner - even the scenery. 

Mrs, Frank Carver, Chairman 
of the Ways and Means Committee, 
and her very active assistants have 
finally 'given in' to popular request. 
This Saturday evening January 
27th preceded by many sociable 
get-to-gethers' the school Mothers 
and Dads will be on hand at 8:30 
o'clock sharp, to dance to their own 
tine Orchestra, tinder the direction 
of Mr. James Chaffe. 

A cordial town-wide invitation is 
extended to all mothers and dads 
to join us in our gaiety. Nobody 
'sits one out' — Nobody wants to. 




"Spend Less 
Than You Get" 

was one of the sayings of Benjamin Franklin, whose 
birthday on January 17 is commemorated by Thrift 
Week. Many things have changed since Franklin 
wrote his famous maxims, but old-fashioned thrift 
is still a< important as ever. 

Make this a year of thrift. Budget your ex- 
penses — live within your income — put something 
aside for the future. Open a Savings Account at 
the Winchester Trust Company and increase it with 
regular deposits. 

Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 

Winchester Trust Company 

85 CHURCH STREET • 16 MT. VERNON ST. 

WINCHESTER. MASSACHUSETTS 

MgMSEH FEDERAL OEPOglT INSURANCE CORPORATION 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 

BANKING HOURS: 8 A. M. to 2 P. M. 
Except Wednesday and Saturday 8 A. M. to 12 Noon 



CRAWFORD MEMORIAL MKTHODIST 
CHURCH 

A FRIENDLY CHI'RCH AT THE 
FORK OF THE ROAD 



Rev. John Snook. Jr.. Minister. Resi- 
dence .10 Dix St. - 6-0139. 

W. Itnvmond Clmse. General Sqpt. 
of Hit Sunday School 153 Cambridge St., 

f-.IISM 

Mr. (harlei P. Potter. Onanist and 



Chnir Director 

Morning Service - 10:45 a. m. 

Sunday School 

9:30 a. rn - Junior and Intermediate 
Dcpts. 

10:45 a. m. - Nursery, Kindergarten, 
and Primary Deptn. 



WANTED 

Secretary-Steno 
20-30 years 

Must have- business school 
education .no I at least 2 
years o ffi c e experience, 
Engineering stenographic 
background desirable. 

40 hour ") da\ v.eek 

Please apply between 9 
a. in. and \'2. Personnel De- 
partment. \tlantic Gela- 
tine Div. of (ienerul Food 
Corp. 

Hill Street. Woburn 



TO LET 



Subject fur the morning - "Methodism's 
Background. " 
Special Note - 

There will ho a very important mooting j 
of tho Pastor's Associates at 5 P. M. to- i 
day at the parsonage. Though tho assign- 
ments will be small, we .shall need every 
member prosont for it is the only get- 
together previous to tho assignments. Re- 
freshments will bo serve*!. 

At tho Mtth.„li»t Youth Fellowship, 
Harold Quigley will load the discussion. 
This Week: 

Thursday 

9:'I0 A M. - Meeting of the Executive 
Hoard of tho Women's Society of Chris- 
tian Service at tho homo of Mrs. Louis 
Griffith, 14 Park Road. 

Thu rsday 

7:30 P. M. - Senior Choir Rehearsal Inote 
change for this week i 
Looking Ahead 

Monday. February 5 

Special meeting of teachers and officers 
as called by the Supervisor of Children's 
Work. Mrs. Ruth Hrown. 

Wednesday. February 7 

Ash Wednesday service of Protestant 
churches at tho Church of the Epiphany, 
with Ke\, John Snook, Jr.. as preacher. 
Wo strongr!) urge the attendance of all 
members at the Lenten L'nion Services. 

Watch for the 90th Anniversary Pro- 
gram of tho church. 



FIRST CONOREC ATIONAL CHI'RCH 
ll» Yeurs of Service to Winchester 

Rev. Howard J. Chidley. D. D. Minister. 
Residence, Fernway. 

Rev. Donald H. Tatr. S T. B„ Assistant 
and Diieetor of Religious Education, Wl 6- 
lO.v; 

J. Albert Wilson, Organist and Choir- 
master. Tel. MYstic s-.|;iT'_\ 

Mrs. James K. Canning, Church Sec- 
retin y, Wl 6-0338. 

Mrs. Donald H. Tarr, It. S. Assistant Di- 
rector of Religions Education ; Secretary, 
Church School, WI 6-1056 

Miss Kliso A. Holcher, Executive Hostess 
Church, Wl fi-17H(i; Home, WI 6- 1645- W 

Next Sunday is International Sundav. , 
At 10:45, Dr. Chidley will preach on "The 
Religion Needed Today." Forum members 
will participate in the service. The Forum 
Choir will sing. 

Church School Hours 

Intermediate and Junior High Depart- 
ments at S':30; Nursery. Kindergarten. 
Primary, and Junior Departments at 10:45 
E>ents of the Week 

Sunday 

4:uii p, M. - Forum International Tea in 
Small Son:,; Hall, Public is invited. 
Monday 

7:00 P. M. - Troop III. Hoy Scout Meet- 
ing in Parish Hall. 

7 : i:> P. M. - Parish Players' Rehearsal. ' 
Tuesday 

10:00 A. M. - Social Service Sowing in 
Kindergarten Room 

7:45 P. M - Jr. Mrs. Guild Meeting in 1 
Kindergarten Room, food demonstration 
"What's New in Food" by Mrs. Ray E. 
Brown, 

Wednesday 

7:45 P. M. - Parish Players' Rehearsal. 
e".'." 1 V " Orchestra Rehearsal at home 
of Mrs. Thomas. 15 Oxford Street. 
Thursday 

7:45 P. M. - Senior Choir Rehearsal. 
S:15 P. M. - Parish Players present 
"Thunder Rock." 
Friday 

*:15 P. M. - Palish Players present 
"Thunder Rock." 
Saturday 

" A. M. - Junior Choir Rehearsal. 
V15 P. M. Parish Players present 
"Thunder Rock." 



Educational film program for 
next week Friday, February 2 at 
7:30 p. m. (Family Night) and 
10:15 a. m. Saturday morning for 
the children: 

Paper 

Painting with sand 
Cartoon 

(Additional film to he an- 
nounced I 



SWING WITH CHAMOIS 



Library Hours 

Adult Department 10 a. m. to 9 
p. m. Saturdays 10 to C> p. m. 

Boys' and Girls' Library 10 to 12 
noon. 1 to i! p. m. 

Telephone Winchester fi-110Ct 



The skiing may not be of the 
best, in fact it may not be at all. 
but the Chamois Ski Club of Win- 
chester is going ahead all the 
same with plans for the big Square 
Dance, to be held on Friday even- 
ing, February 9. Tickets are avail- 
able at the Winchester Sport Shop. 
And remember, for the bulging 
purses of high schoolers we have a 
special half-rate, and Langdon 
Smith has those tickets. Speaking 
of Smith, we have obtained again 
the services of Al Smith as the 
Caller, and those who were on hand 
last time will remember how very 
good he was. 

So if you're discouraged by the 
lack of snow, at least there'll not be 
any lack of Square Dancing, so get 
in the swing with Chamois. Come 
on down and join the crowd! 



NOON AN ASSEMBLY 
PROGRAM 



The second grade of the Noonan 
School held its assembly on Fri- 
day, January 19. The theme was 
"Transportation". Helen Plante 
was the announcer. The class sang 
three songs entitled "On the 
Train", "My Ship", and "Travel". 

Those who showed their pictures 
and told stories about the progress 
of land transportation were Sandra 
Chamberland, Catherine Lizotte, 
Marie Gregory, Joyce Barnard, 
Ralph Matvhesi, Larry Donlin, 
Michael Sullivan, and Marcia Mar- 
tell. 

Those who told about water 
transportation were Terry Collins, 
Victor Cotrone, Robert Murphy, 
and Tommy Russo, 

The progress of air transporta- 
tion was narrated by Mary Dono- 
van, Donald Xadeau, Harry Bor, 
Richard Franson, and Jean Roliver. 

Characters in the play entitled 
"David's First Train Ride" were 
Joyce Barnard, Terry Collins, 
Donald Xadeau, Larry Donlin, Vic- 
tor Cotrone, Lee Ellen Manzie, 
Stewart Poole, Robert Murphy, 
Marie Gregory, Harry Bor, arid 
Tommy Russo. 



MOFFETT 

TAXI SER VICE 

Winchester 6-1739 
mals-tf 




GALUFFO S TAXI 



Weddings and Long Trips 
Special Rates 

TEL. Wl 6-0602 

malS-tf 



ALLEN S TAXI 

PROMPT DEPENDABLE 
SERVICE 

Call Winchester 6-0792 

aeptl-tf 



FN K A DIRECTORS' 
M FETING 



SI. MARY'S CHURCH 



FOR RENT Very nice rqon and 

bath for right person (luod neighborhood - 
near transport ation W l 6-2093- R • 

FOR RENT — Sunny room on bathroom 
f'.oor - near center - Rusiness man or 
woman pre ferr ed - W I 6-1545-W jHnlfl-'Jt 

WHO HAS TIE PEN ? 



Recently a student, at the high 
school, lost an envelope containing 
money, 2 fountain pens and other 
articles. One pen was inscribed 
with lur father's name, and has 
sentimental value to him. Will the 
person who has this particular pen 
in his or hei possession, simply put 
it in an envelope, addressed to the 
name on the pen and drop it in a 
mail box. It will be appreciated by 
both father and daughter. 



Rev. John P. O'Riordan. Pastor 

Assistants: Rev. Charles Anadore. 
Re». Franria ONeil and R*». William 
Walsh. 



Masses at 7. 9. 10, 11 and 11:50 a. m. 
Sundav School after tho 9 o'clock Masa. 



NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Virges. Hill, Pa.tor. 

0 Pleasant View Avenue. Everett. 
Tel. KVorett 3-0»26-M. 

10:4,i a. m. Morning Service. 



The Church of the Open Bible 

i C ndenominatifnal ' 
lords n«> 9:10 A.M., Church-School: 
10:4.1 A.M.. Worship Service: 7:00 
P.M.. l,.,..pel Servi.e Re>. C. Helirer- 
-,on. Pastor. 

rhursday. 7:1.1 P.M . Prayer Meeting. 

Montvale Ave.. Woburn 

1 incornorated 1 >»'.'! ;an">-4t 



WANTED 

STENOGRAPHER 

GENERAL OFFICE WORK 
Some knowledge of bank machine 
work desirable 

WINCHESTER NATIONAL BANK 



CARD OF THANKS 

The family of the late James H. 
Xoonan wish to sincerely thank 
their relatives, friends, and neigh- 
bors for their many acts of kindness 
and thoughtfulness in our recent 
bereavement. We gratefully ac- 
knowledge the numerous spiritual 
bouquets and floral tributes sent 
in his memory. We wish to thank 
also the following groups: 

Neighbors, Winchester Fire De- 
partment. Winchester Police De- 
partment, F.ast Boston Telephone 
Operators, Mass. Dept. of Con- 
servation, P. T. Foley Company. 

Mrs. James H. Noonan and Family 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE NOTES 

The Winchester School Com- 
mittee met jointly with the Wash- 
ington School Addition Building 
Committee last Monday evening. 
Genera] plans, design, and probable 
cost were the chief discussion 
items. 

Following the joint session the 
School Committee acted on regular 
items of business. 

It was decided that there will be 
no further changes in the lunch 
houi of the elementary schools. 

The Committee accepted the re- 
-ignations of Mrs. Mary Mead, 
teacher of Giade Two at the Wy- 
nian School. 

The Committee also accepted the 
resignation of Mrs. Mavis Demsey, 
eleik in the office of Principal 
Wade L. Grindle. 

Further discussion of the items 
in the School Department budget, 
such as supplies, operating ex- 
penses, salaries and wages oc- 
cupied the remainder of the meet- 



THE S< HENLEY STARS 

To The Christian Science Monitor: 
In the December 4 issue of Time 
magazine there is a two page seduc- 
tive whisky advertisement in color, 
w ith the portraits of five "stars" in 
evening dress, each holding a glass 
of liquor. The advertisement says: 
"Trust the stars to choose the best! 
They're giving and serving 
Schenley for the holidays. Why 
don't you? Join these stars who 
drink and serve smooth, sociable 
Schenley." 

The names of the (motion pic- 
tures) "stars" are printed under 
each portrait. 

The Schenley advertisement asks, 
"Why don't you join the stars who 
drink?" Well, bless my stars! I 
have read that liquor, "At the last, 
bitta»h like a serpent and stingeth 
like an adder,'' and that "it is the 
devil's best friend and God's worst 
enemy." 

I write from experience gained in 
fifty-two years' membership in the 
Massachusetts and American Medi- 
cal Societies and as captain in the 
I'nited States Medical Corps in 
World War II. I know that the 
"stars" have contributed their full 
share to the nine billion dollars 
spent for liquor in this country last 
year. No country can continue to 
spend that amount for liquor each 
year and prosper, maintain pres- 
tige, and strength. If athletes in 
training, whose success depends up- 
on the best physical condition, are 
prohibited the use of liquor, doesn't 
it follow that it isn't good for any- 
body who wants to maintain a 
strong body and a sound mind?" 

I know that the "stars," by incit- 
ing to drink, are helping to make 
our highways avenues of death by 
drunken drivers who yield to their 
persuasion. I know that, by their 
example, they are contributing 
their full share to the unhappiness. 
poverty, and suffering in homes 
where there is excessive indulgence 
in intoxicants, and, also, that the 
majority of the ever-increasing sex 
crimes are largely due to drink. 

It is a falsity that indulgence in 
any degree contributes to the pleas- 
uie or edification of any social 
event; on the contrary, the benefits 
that such association should yield 
are lessened because of the impair- 
ment of clear thinking and normal 
mental functioning that alcohol 
produces. 

Alcohol is not a stimulant; it will 
cure no disease. The only argument 
in favor of it is the liquor dealers' 
argument — the traffic pays. In 
addition to the vast sum paid' year- 
ly in this country for liquor, two 
billion dollars a year is spent for 




The Board of Selectmen 
will hold a public hearing in 
its office on February 5, 1951 
at 7:30 p. m. on the applica- 
tion of Vincent G. Carroll for 
permission to buy and sell 
second-hand motor vehicles 
at <JT> Main Street. All per- 
sons interested are invited to 
be present. 

By Order of the Board 
of Selectmen 

Mary H. French, Clerk 

January V< 



Mrs. Leslie Tucker of Hillcrest 
Parkway opened her house last 
week for a meeting of the director s 
of the En Ka Street Fair. 

Mrs. Tucker is chairman of this 
year's fair and has as her directors, 
Mrs. Donald F. Connors, Secretary. 
Mrs. Richard A. Harlow, Treasurer, 
Mrs. Edward T. Peabody and Mrs. 
Lyndon Burnham, Midway. Mrs. 
James Beale and Mrs. Herbert 
Wadsworth, Chances. Mrs. Walter 
P. Keyes, Publicity and Mrs. Leslie 
J, Scott, properties. 



LANE TAXI 
SERVICE 

Local and distance trips 

Call Winchester 6-2580 



DRESSMAKING 

i ll I.I \\ \\ . SCOTT 

Men's and Women's 
Alterations and Repair* 

WOburn 2-0C76-W 
8 Garfield Avenue 
Woburn, Mass. 



WEDDING GOWNS 

Exclusive creations. Beauti- 
ful workmanship. Made to 
order, ready to wear, also 
bridesmaids gowns. 

SERI GELENTAN 

9 Ravine Rnad. W«t Mrdford 
r*l. AKIington .',-051fi-J janlU-:it* 



THE NEW 

WINCHESTER CAB 
TAXI 

Loral and Long Distance 
24 — HOUR SERVICE 

Earl C. .Ionian 

Phones 
Days - 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Winchester 6-1931 

Nights - Sundays - Holidays 
Winchester 6-.r>83 

oetS-tf 



C0U6HLIN JUNK CO. 

!(«»« P.p*r. Mafaiina* 
Mrtai 

Tel. Winchester 6-2040 

ma6-tf 




BOARD OF SURVEY 

Notice is hereby given that 
the Board of Survey of the 
Town of Winchester, Mass., 
will give a public hearing in 
the Selectmen's Room in the 
Town Hall Building on Mon- 
day the fifth day of February 
A. D. 1981 at 8 p. m. upon 
the petition of Richard Riga 
365 Cross Street for approval 
of plans filed with said peti- 
tion for a way, as yet un- 
named, extending from Cross 
Street northwesterly about 
two hundred sixty (260) feet 
t o Woburn - Winchester 
Town line which he proposes 
to open for public use. 

After which hearing the 
Board may alter said pian 
and determine where said 
way shall be located and the 
width and grade thereof. 

Prior to the hearing the 
plan may be examined at the 
office of the Town Engineer. 

By order of the Board of 
Survey this fifteenth day of 
January 1951. 

Maiy H. French 
Clerk 

jan26-2t 



FOR ALL 

Automobile rrpaim on all makra 
of ram. rail 

Christian W. Eriksen 

20 Gro»e Plare. Winrhester 
Wl S-3192 

Specializing on Buicka and 
General Motor cars. 

dec8-tf 



Dr. Ruth A. Boule 

Chiropodist — Podiatrist 

SI VINE ST. W1NCHE8THB 
loppoaito WineheaUr Thaatra) 

Bonn br Appointment Onlr 

Tel. Winchester 6-1989 



FIREPLACE WOOD 

LOAM — MANURE 
Asphalt Driveways 
Chimney Repairing and 
Masonwork 

J. A. COSTANZA 
MElrose 4-7812 nov-ir-tf 



FLOORS 

NEW FLOORS LAID 
OLD ONES RESURFACED 

MERENDA FLOOR CO. 

Tel. Winchester 6-1774 or 
Winchester 6-3123 



Harvey's Barber Shop 

Plenty of Parking Space 

Winchester Place 

opposite Police Station 



fS-tf 



WILLIAM BLANCHARD 

CO., INC. 
Awnings Tents 
Venetians Blinds Shades 
Tel. CRystal 9-0379 
456 Main St., Wakefield 

malS-tt 



CARPENTER 

I Specializing in small home 
i repairs 

ROY W. WILSON I 
I 5 Cliff St. WI 6-O1S0-W I 



EMBASSY HAND 
LAUNDRY 

Complete Laundry and 
Dry Cleaning Service 

595 Main Street 

Same Building as First Natl. 
Store Super Market 

For delivery call WI 6-2220 
septS-tf 



Thomas Quigley, Jr. 

CONTRACTORS 
CEMENT AND STONE MASON 
MOTOR TRANSPORTATION 
Power Shu»el Air Uimprraaor 

Road Ruller Drilling 

Concrete Miier Hlaating 
Tractor Rock I nintini 



WINCHESTER'S 

JUNK DEALER 

HIGHEST PRICES PAID 

Call Ed Murphy 

TEL Wl 6-1346-M 



MACEFIELD 

hand wrought 
jewelry and silver 
10 Winchester place 
wi 6-2989 



!r7-«f 



8 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 1951 



CHECK YODR SUPPLIES 



PENCILS 
NOTEBOOK FILLERS 
STENCILS 
PASTE 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



PENS 
FOUNTAIN PENS 
SCHOOL BAGS 
RULERS 



COMPASSES 
NOTEBOOKS 

PAINTS 
POSTER INK 



DRAWING INK 
GLUE 
GRIPPIT 
PAPER PADS 



OFFICE SUPPLIES 



ERASERS 
TYPEWRITER RIBBONS 
TYPEWRITER PAPER 
COPY PAPER 
STAPLERS 



STAPLES 
ENVELOPES 
SCOTCH TAPE 
MYSTIC TAPE 
PAPER CLIPS 



ADDING MACHINE 
ROLLS 

MANIFOLD PAPER 

CARBON PAPER 

BLOTTERS 



ALSO 



NAPKINS 
TOILET PAPER 



CREPE PAPER 
PAPER TOWELS 



WRAPPING PAPER 
WAX PAPER 



SOMETHING NEW 

CARTER'S "DIP WRITER" - COMPLETE WITH PEN AND INK 

3 IS 



ZIP KEY-REEL. IN ASSORTMENT OF SIX COLORS 

ONLY $1.00 



WILSON THE STATIONER 

3 CHURCH STREET 
STAR BUILDING WINCHESTER 6-0029 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY. JANUARY 26, 1951 



9 



WLV< HESTER FROSH TRIPPED 
READING 

The Winchester High Freshmen 
won their fourth straight victory of 
the season by defeating the Read- 
ing Freshmen by a score of 53 - ,'il 
at Reading last Friday afternoon. 
This marked the first time in three 
years that the Winchester Fresh- 
men have been able to beat Read- 
ing at Heading and the game was ■ 
close until the last period when the 
locals outscored Reading by 12 
points in that quarter to win go- 
ing away. Dave Pratt with 1 7 
points. "Moose" Bellino with 15, 
and Joe Dilorio with 11 points were 
the leading scorers for Winches- 
ter as "Moose" really put on a 
dazzling floor exhibition. 

In the preliminary game the 
Winchester Junior High ijuintet 
easily defeated Reading Junior 
High by a score of 38 - 16. This 
victory balances the Junior High 



season to date with two victories 
and two defeats. 

The summary; 

Winrhextrr I re-hmen 



Dltorio, If 

M- Dottttu&h. 
Kionlan. rf 

O'Brien, i f 

Itrck.r, rf 

Pr»it, c 
KcKfnley, c 
He lino, ig 
Butter. Ik 
IV-rkins. rx 
LiitiKt-y. rg 



Totals 



Rtadinit Vi-olimen 



Nowcll, If 
Hoiey. If 
R. Kills, rf 
J. Talbot, rf 
Mathews, c 
Thompkiris, <• 
IJesmi,re, ]« 
Kunge, lg 
li. El is, rg 
W. Talbot, rg 



Totals 
Referee, 



g 


f 


J.ts. 


s 


1 


1 1 


0 


1 


1 


0 


2 


2 


0 


0 


0 


0 


0 


0 


> 


1 


1" 


I) 


0 


0 


5 


5 


15 


0 


1 


1 


1) 


0 


0 




o 


6 


— 

21 
II 


11 


S3 


g 


f 


pis. 


0 


(1 




0 


0 


l\ 


0 


1 


1 ! 


1 


<) 


2 


0 


1 


1 




1 




1 


0 


2 


0 


1 


1 


F 


4 


14 


i) 


I 


1 


11 







Hoy! 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 




THE ORLAND HOUSE 

:U2 Forest Street, Maiden 
MRSISG HOME 



Director 

Edna M. Brawn 

SToneham 6-1762 



Managers 
Orland & Fanny Colborne 
MAlden 4-2690 

janl»-:(t 



PRICE IS THE THING 



Measured in Hollars, our service is a 
venienee. freedom of time and ease of I 
right amazing. 

Here are some typical bundles 
our flat work service 

3 sheets 




bargain. In eon- 
iving, it is down- 

from 



sheets 
pillow slips 
hand towels 
bath towels 
table cloth 



4 wash cloths 
SI 51 



2 pillow slips 
9 bath towels 
20 handkerchiefs 
6 undershirts 
6 underdrawers 
2 pair pajamas 
9 pair socks 
5 shirts 

$3.52 



5 sheets 

6 pillow slips 
1 hand towel 
4 napkins 

4 shirts 

$2.71 



LAUNDRY 



3-13 Lincoln Street 



Phone CKvstal 9-0116 



VNOTHER WIN FOR INDIANS 

Winchester High defeated Wake- 
field High by a score by 5o - 41 at 
Wakefield hist Friday night. This 
was no easy victory for the Red and 
Black for Wakefield was big and 
aggressive and the verdict was in 
doubt right down to the final two 
minutes of a hectic ball game. The 
Wakefield quintet was very tough 
defensively and gave the locals 
more trouble off the backboards 
than they have encountered this 
year. As a result Winchester was 
held to its secmd lowest point scor- 
ing total of the year even though 
the Red and Black had an amazing 
average of 46 per cent of their 
shots. 

The teams were tied at 11 - 11 
at the end of the first period but 
Winchester picked up six extra 
points in the second quarter to lead 
24 - 18 at the half. The third quar- 
ter was nip and tuck as the teams 
matched point for point in that 
period which ended with the locals 
leading ^7 - 31 as they clung tenaci- 
ously to their six point lead. The 
final quarter continued in the same 
vein as each team tried unsuccess- 
fully to generate a scoring spurt 
that would clinch the victory. With 
two and a half minutes to play. 
Winchester called time out when 
they were leading 46 - 41. The 
locals then put on a brilliant 
"freeze," holding Wakefield score- 
less over the remaining time while 
breaking Rodney Long and Stowell 
Symmes loose for baskets that 
nailed down an important win. 

Doug Hawkins was the main cog 
in the Winchester victory with bis 
valuable 15 points to pace the local 
scoring and his even more valuable 
rebounding off hoth backboards. 




Planned 
For Health 

The soaring skyscraper ... or the 
cozy cottage ... is possible only 
because skilled builders have faith- 
fully followed an architect's plan. 
In like manner, the effectiveness of 
your prescribed medicine depends 
upon the precision with which the 
pharmacist follows your doctor's 
carefully considered plan of treat- 
ment. We blend our skill with his 
in carrying out his plan of me- 
dication which is exactly right for 
your personal requirements. 



m§ 294 WASH ST.tjgl 
^Q^WI NCH ESTE R^*^ 




Still 



Doubled In Value — Low In Cost! 



Take a look at your telephone bill. 
In ten years on the average many things 
you buy have more than doubled in price* 
. . . but not telephone service. 

Remember lamb at 29 t - a pound . . . eggs at 
35c a dozen? Remember 
coffee at 20c a pound? 
Today you get the same 
pound . . . the same dozen 
. . . and look at the cost! 




But your telephone pound — dozen — - 
however you want to measure it — has more 
than doubled — and the increased cost is but 
a few cents a day. 

Here's a household necessity that actually 
gives you more — yet takes a much smaller 
percentage of your household budget than it 
did ten years ago. That's because living costs 
have gone up much more than your tele- 
phone service. 



NEW ENGLAND 



The 

Telephone 

Company 



*t\ S Dtp! of Labor 
Bureau ot Labor Statistic* 



Charlie Murphy drew the tough as- 
signment of guarding Stanton, the 
high scoring Wakefield forward, 
anil more than rose to the occasion 
as he held him to 7 points while 
BCOriilg 11 himself. Although 
hampered by four personal fouls 
during most of the game, John Di- 
lorio came through with timely sec- 
ond half baskets as he collected If? 
points. Johnny Farrell played his 
I best game of the season as he ef- 
| fectively tied up his opponent while 
I drawing assists on several Win- 
i chester baskets which he set up 
j with his accurate passing. 

The Winchester Seconds con- 
I tinned to romp through their op- 
position as they swamped the 
Wakefield Seconds by a score of 
68 - 28. John Atkinson with 10 
points, Peter t oon with 11, and Bob 
Flaherty with 10 points were the 
scoring leaders in this latest rout 
of the opposition. 
The summary: 

Winchester High 



K. OF C. HELD SPORTS 
NIOHT 





g 


f 


pts. 


Symmes. If 




0 


ti 


Long, rf 


1 


o 


4 


Farri 11. rf 


1 


u 


2 


Hawkins, c 


"l 




15 


Murphy. Ig 


s 




It 


Dilorio, rg 


•", 




12 


Forester, rg 


II 


0 


u 


Cirurso, rg 


0 


0 


0 


Total* 


19 


12 


50 


Wakefield 


High 








K 


f 


pts. 


Stanton. If 




1 




(iouiley. If 


0 


1 


i 


Scanlon, rf 




2 


8 


lllanchard. rf 


U 


0 


0 


Schmidt, d 


0 


it 


3 


Smith, c 




0 


4 


Dona van, lir 


2 




!> 


Martin, lg 


0 




0 


Porter, rg 


ti 


;i 


15 


Shea, rg 


ii 


0 


(1 


Totals 


15 


11 




Referees, Thomas and 


(lard mi 







W VAN OK E REFNION 



At camp Wyanoke's forty-second 
Winter Reunion, the first official 
event of the forty-third camping 
season, held last Saturday at the 
Hotel Statler, Boston, there were 
a number of Winchester boys and 
their parents. Among the boys at- 
tending were Dan Adams, David 
Bentley, Ted Freeman, Hob Free- 
man, Rich Rimbach and Don 
Withers. 

Staff members from Winchester 
present were Mr. and Mrs. Brad- 
ford M. Bentley, Mrs. W. H. Bent- 
ley, Mr. Henry T. Knowlton, Mr. 
John West, Mr. Richard Richmond, 
and Mr. David Shiverick. 

Mr. Thomas Downes and Mr. 
Harry Hood, Jr., former campers, 
attended with their sons. 



<>n Monday evening, Januarj 
22, Winchester Council, No. 210, 
Knights of Columbus, held a Sports 
\ight with "Chuckin" Charlie 
O'Rourke, former B. C. football 
great; Joe Tansey, athletic director 
of Wentworth Institute; Henry 
Knowlton. Winchester High School 
athletic director and football coach; 
"Kd" Bartlett, Winchester High's 
basketball and baseball coach and 
County Commissioner Jim Cullen, 
who was a star wrestler at M. I. T 
Grand Knight Harry Boyle wel- 
comed the members and guests, 
also introducing Lecturer Coleman 
(i. Foley, w ho acted as toastmaster. 

Charlie O'Rourke had a message 
for both the youngsters and adult.-, 
uiging the hoys to master their 
algebra and the foreign language 
if they aspire to play college foot- 
ball. He bemoaned the continual 
loss of potential football material 
due to scholastic deficiencies, and 
declared that at Holy Cross they 
often watch good material leave 
the campus after interviews, due 
to failure to meet scholastic re- 
quirements, He urged parents to 
interest themselves in their child- 
ren and not be too busy to listen 
to their accomplishments. 

Coach Knowlton, who later show- 
ed movies of the Winchester - Wo- 
burn Thanksgiving game and other 
football highlights, praised the 
Winchester School System for its 
excellent equipment and facilities 
for sports. lie also commended 
the local fans for the way they fol- 
low their teams and stated that a 
big factor in the success of Win- 
chester teams is the fine support of 
Winchester parents. 

Coach Bartlett emphasized Mr. 
O'Rourke's remarks concerning the 
importance of a boy's studies to his 
sports. Concerning spirit and co- 
operation, he cited this year's bas- 
ketball team which to date has won 
10 straight games and is unde- 
feated. This year's team, without 
lettermen from last year, came to 
him in April, asking for special 
practise during the summer 
months. Despite a busy program 
of Softball and Junior Legion base- 
ball, Coach Bartlett found time to 
help the boys, who practised two 
evenings a week during the sum- 
mer with excellent results. This 
determination, will, and drive will 
be an asset, he said, in whatever 
these boys attempt in later life. 
He also cited the football team's 
fine showing as another example 
of how hard work pays. 



Joe Tansey, who has done some 
officiating in football, as well as 
coaching told of the plight of the 
official and the worries of tiie 
coach. He declared that today 
there is confusion and chaos in col- 
lege ranks because of the war sit- 
uation, but urged any boys inter- 
ested in college to contact him 
about the possibility of enrolling 
at his alma mater, Norwich Uni- 
versity. 

Commissioner Cullen reviewed 
old acquaintances with Coach 
Knowlton and told interesting 
stories about his wrestling days at 
Tech. He praised the other speak- 
ers and offered the information 
that defeat is hard to take, but 
that defeat really makes the man, 
while victory gets all the glamour! 
Toastmaster Foley announced the 
forthcoming C. V. o. Minstrel 
show, the Holy Name Society Com- 
munion Breakfast and the Catholic 
Daughters' Dance, adding a fine 
Johnny Pesky anecdote. 

Coach Knowlton introduced the 
following football lettermen; 
O'Brien, Cullen, Smith, Cirurso, 
Crowley, Peluso, Walden, Keyes, 
Johnson, Michelsen, McElhinney, 
l.entini, Donlon, Amundsen, Errico. 

Substantial refreshments were 
'served; lest we forget, Dan O'Dori- 
nell was responsible for a movie 
short on the great Irish game of 
shillelagh which was a riot, to say 
the least, and highly enjoyed! 




St. Mary's 5th Annual Show 

MINSTRELS OF 1951" 



BENEFITING C.Y.O. ACTIVITIES 

Hoy Scatttt, <rirl Scouts. Cub Scouts. Brownie Scouts, 
Hoys' and Cirls" Basketball. Boys' Baseball, Girls' Softball 
Dramatic Group, 

At Winchester High School Auditorium 
Saturday, February 3rd 



TICKETS 

CHILDREN'S SHOW 2:0(1 P. 
ADULTS' SHOW 8:00 P. 



.60 INC. TAX 
SI .20 INC. TAX 



CALL 

Mrs. Leo V. .\Janoli. Winchester fi-2692 
Mrs. Michael J. Connolly. Winchester 6-1303-R 
Mrs. John Gorman, W inchester 6-2313 
Mrs. Margaret Murray, Winchester 6-0361 -W 
Mrs. B. Robert Finn. Winchester 6-077S 
St. Mary's Sodality 
St. Mary's Holy Name Society 
Knights of Columbus 



janl!>-2t 



ST. MARY'S MIDGETS WON 

St. Mary's Midgets, coached by 
Ronnie Goodrow, opened their sea- 
son last Wednesday evening, beat- 
ing the Immaculate Conception. 23- 
li), at the Woburn High gym. 
Underdogs going into the contest. 
St. Mary's trailed at the quarter, 
2-0, and were behind at the half. 
11 - G. 

After a time out in the third 
quarter St. Mary's came to life, 
tying the score at thirteen on three 
quick baskets by Joe Bellino and 
shot from a free try by Louie Far- 
rell. Seconds later a foul basket 
by Dick Mawn put St. Mary's in 
front while stolen passes by Quill 
and McManus set up Farrell with 
j two more floor goals. 

Gouthro and Lennon scored for 
the Immacs, and a foul shot by 
McDonough again knotted the 
count at eighteen. McManus put 
St. Mary's in front once more with 
a free try, and baskets by "Binks" 
Carrier and Farrell ran the count 
to 23- 19, with the Immacs adding 
but a point to their total in the 
final moments. 

The summary: 

St. Mary's 

K f pt.s. 

Muwn 0 I 1 

Hellino 4 0 S 

Karroll 5 1 11 

Carrirr 1 0 J 

McManus 0 1 1 

Corby 0 0 0 

Quill 0 0 0 

Ledger 0 0 0 

Keating 0 0 0 



Totals 



Immaculate* 



10 :t 2:t 



MrD'inmijrh 

Murphy 

.1. McDonnuirh 

Gouthro 

Linehan 

Golden 

Lennnn 

Totals 



pts. 

2 

ii 

fi 

4 

I 

0 



Private William T. Shoemaker, 
son of Mr. and Mis. J. Warren 
Shoemaker of 1 Wildwood street, 
has been assigned to a unit of the 
famous 2nd Armored Division at 
Mt. Hood, Texas for training. 



CIVIL SERVICE IS 
BEST SEALER OF 
WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Exam fur \\ inrhpster. 
March 31; 
File Application 
bv March 12 



Gt>t A Secure, Life-time Job! 
Our Home Study Course is 
The Best Available 

Over 21 Years Teaching 
Civil Service Courses 

Call KE 6-4518 
for details or write 
DONOHl E S CIVIL 
SERVICE INSTITLTE 
271 Huntington Ave.. Boston 
janlJMt 



Communion Breakfast Speaker 

FAMILY ( OMYll NION 
BREAK F VST 

On Sunday morning, February 
11. St. Mary's Holy Name Society 
will attend the 8:00 a. m. mass 
with their wives, son.-, daughters, 
sweethearts, relatives, or friends, 
will receive Communion in a body, 
and listen to an appropriate sermon 
preached by Lev. William II, 
Walsh, spiritual leader. Following 
the mass, the assembly will ad- 
journ to the town hall for a catered 
breakfast. This Family Breakfast 
will take place of the previous 
"Father - Sons" and "Father - 
Daughters" affairs, particularly 
bringing into the picture the 
mothers. President Arthur W. 
Hall expects a huge gathering to 
attend so it is advisable for all 
planning to go to procure their tic- 
kets immediately. 

Breakfast Chairman, Coleman G. 
■ Foley, Jr., has succeeded in ob- 
taining the Cleveland Indians' star 
catcher. Jim Hegan as guest speak- 
er, and he will bring along his w ife 
and young son. A native of Lynn, 
and a Holy Name member in his 
own parish, Jim will be remem- 
bered as the former schoolboy sen- 
sation and All Scholastic who has 
made good. 

Hegan stands 6.02 in height and 
weighs L>5 lbs. Before joining the 
Cleveland Indians, he played for 
such minor league teams as, 
Springfield, Wilkes-Barre, Okla- 
homa City and Baltimore, taking 
time out to serve his countrv in the 
years 1943 - 45. 

Jim really came into his own as 
a top ranking catcher in 1948 w hen 
Cleveland won its first pennant in 
28 years, going on to defeat our 
own Braves in the World Series. 
During this season Hegan had the 
thrill of catching practically three 
20 game winners. Gene Bearden 
and Bob Lemon w inning 2ft and Bob 
Feller having lit wins. 

During the Sunday game of the 
World Series of 1948, before a sta- 
dium packed with over 86,000 fans, 
Jim blasted a terrific homer to 
drive in three runs. In 1947 - 18 
he led the league in put outs and in 
double plays. 

In l!>. r >0 with Bona of the Yanks 
considered to bo the number one 
catcher, it is interesting to note 
that Hegan made only 5 errors to 
Berra's 13. He also had only 3 
passed halls to Berra's 7. It will 
certainly be a pleasure to hear the 
stories and anecdotes of this fine 
speaker, who no doubt will tell 
what baseball has meant to him 
and who will have a message for 
the youngsters as well as for 
adults. If time permits, a question 
and answer period will be held 
after Hegan's address. 

SPENCER IN MR FORCE 

Richard I. Spencer, son of Mr. 
and Mis. Karle F. Spencer of 8 
Yale street enlisted in the 0. S. 
Air Force with the rank of private, 
it has been announced bv the 
C. S. A. and V. S. A. F. recruiting 
station in Portland, Maine. He 
was sworn in January Itl, 1951 and 
will report to Lackland A. F. Base 

I at San Antonio, Texas, as his 

1 initial assignment. 

Private Spencer is a graduate of 
Belmont Hill School and was a 
student at the University of Maine. 



LET US PLAN 



RE-ENTERS NAVY 

Verne F. Jensen, GMA3, USN, 
formerly of .'! Salem street in Win- 
chester reported for duty on the 
12th day of January at the Pensa- 

: cola Naval Air Station, the oldest 
and largest Naval Air Station in 

j the world. Jensen served with the 
Navy during the Second World 
War and again abandoned civilian 
life to enter the Navy when his 
country needed him. 




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10 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY. JANUARY 26. 1951 



WINCHESTER 






WINCHESTER HOSPITAL 
NEWS 

Interest in the series of Know- 
Your-Hospital evenings at Win- 
chester Hospital is proving to be 
cumulative. Those present at the 
third number of the -cries on Jan- 
uary I >*t h were noticeably more at 
home in taking part in the discus- 
sion and keenei to bring out the 
importance of the two departments 
on the program, ■ tin- hospital 
office and the medical records de- 
partment. 

Miss Ada Sleeth, Accountant, the 
senior membei of the office per- 
sonnel, is responsible !'<>i its proper 
functioning. She des 
procedure of admittin 
and nnnonni ed thai I h> 
i tmtly been made avai 
maternity patients a 
admission form whi 



out three 
vat inn da! 
pi i ties the 
new form 
sion data 

eludes als 

the birth 



the 1 

the iter 
•rtuieatt 
ing 



•ribed tl 

patients, 
re has re- 
able to all 
'tiller pre- 
form which can be made 
months before the reser- 
e. and which vastly sim- 
actuu.l admission, This 
gives not only all admis- 
foi the mother, but in- 
e.tjuired for 
the baby. 
In referring to the switch board 
in the hospital office, Miss Sleeth 
said that the six outside lines are 
not the only factors in the load 
carried by the operator, since this 
board carries also all interdepart- 
mental calls, as well as the in-com- 
ing and out-going calls for the tele- 
phones in several of the hospital's 
private rooms. 

Blue Cross membership carried 
by more than 65' < of the 4,000 
adult patients each year involves 
notice of all such memberships as 
soon as a patient enters the hos- 
pital, and complete report to the 
Blue Cross headquarters at the 
time of discharge. Blue Cross cov- 
erage is also concerned in the sev- 
eral thousand out-patient services 
rendered each year by the clinical 
pathological laboratory and the 
X-ray department, and the office 
handles details of many other 
forms of insurance, such as indus- 
trial-accident. Investigation and 
record is necessary in connection 
with many other special accounts, 
including those of veterans and 
state and town cases. 

In speaking of salaries and 
wages. Miss Sleeth said there 
are more than 160 full and part- 
time employees of the hopsital, for 
whom payrolls are prepared weekly 
and semi-monthly, with many spe- 
cial items involving careful book- 
keeping, such as Blue Cross and 
Blue Shield membership, income 
tax and Social Security deductions. 
Among the many reports prepared 
by the office are those made month- 
ly to the Hospital's Board of Direc- 
tors and to the Hospital Council of 
Metropolitan Boston, of which this 
Hospital is a member. 



Mrs. Bayers of the Medical 

Records office carries the title 
U. R. L , which means that she has 
passed nationally standardized ex- 
aminations under the Council on 
Medical Education and Hospitals 
of the A. M. A., making her a 
Registered Record Librarian. She 
pus, -nteri two authentic medical 
records, with fictitious names for 
patients and physicians, to show 
the many kinds of information in- 
cluded on the several forms. 

She described in interesting de- 
tail the many uses of the record 
and its importance to the patient, 
to the hospital, and to the physi- 
cian. The record, as Mrs. Bayers 
pointed out, is the source material 
foi medical research, with all that 
this mean- to medical and surgical 
progress toward better health for 
everyone. The facts presented 
made amply clear the reason why 
the standing of a hospital is so 
largely dependent on the quality 
of the patients' records and on the 
promptness with which each mem- 
bei lit' the staff completes, those 
for which he is responsible, 

Accident cases which result in 
personal injury suits often require 
the producing of medical records 
upon court oidei or subpoena, and 
the record librarian serves as 
representative of the hospital in 
responding to the order. Mrs. 
Bayers has had to go to courts in 
Salem, Lowell, Cambridge, Wo- 
burn, and Boston, to be sworn in as 
a witness and read parts of Win- 
chester Hospital records on request 
of lawyers. 

Two studi nts from Winchester 
High School attended this program 
on invitation through Mr. Follies 
Xorris, Superintendent of Schools. 
They showed keen interest in the 
professional attractiveness 0 f ;l 
career : .s medical record librarian. 

Mrs. George A. Marks, Chairman 
of the Sencs, called upon Mr. Har- 
lan L. Paine, Jr., Administrator of 
Winchester Hospital. Mr. Paine 
congratulated the audience on hav- 
ing these programs available to 



give them a true picture of the way 
in which their hospital function.-. 
He called special attention to the 

skill in which the two speakers of 
the evening had presented the in- 
ti icacies of their work. They had. 
he said, shown that each such hos- 
pital department is a highly com- 
plex organism whose smooth func- 
tioning is vital to its successful ser- 
vice. "The hospital itself", said 
Mr. Paine, "is, therefore, a com- 
bination of these complex units, 
which in itself — if it is a good 
hospital — becomes a smooth mesh- 
ing of many parts into a single, 
very complicated, larger unit, 
geared to its single task of bring- 
ing medical and surgical aid to 
everyone who needs it." 



FRIENDS OF WINCHESTER 
HOSPITAL 



The Janu 
the Friends 
pita] was Ik 
uary IS, in t 
Mrs. Fulton 



uv board meeting of 
»f the Winchester Hos- 
Id last Thursday, Jan- 
he Nurses' Home, with 
Brown presiding. The 



secretary s repc 
Erskine N, Wti 
V. Bonzagni p 
urei's report, 
the day was 
membership — 



rt was read by Mi s. 
te, and Mrs. Henry 
resented the treas- 
The good news of 



>ta! Friends 



ing daily 

Mrs. Arthur Hertig was 
corned to the hoard as the he 
cording secretary, taking the 



re- 
lace 



Reading, w ho has 



REPLACES DR. SITTER IN 
W ASHINCTON 



membership 



Rev. John Wallace Sutcr. D. D., 
a former Winchester boy who re- 
signed during December as dean of 
Washington Cathedral, is now rec- 
tor of St. Andrew's Church in Hop- 
kinton, N. IL. and a teacher at St. 
Paul's School in Concord, N. H. 

Before going to Washington Dr. 
Suter was lector of the Church 
of the Epiphany in New York. He 
grew up in the Winchester Epi- 
phany Parish of which his father, 
the late Dr. John Wallace Suter. 
was the first lector, heading the 
parish at the time the present 
church was built, 

Replacing Dr. Suter in Washintr- 
ton, is Lev. Francis B. Sayre, Jr.. 
grandson of Woodrow Wilson and 
rector of St. Paul's church, East 
Cleveland. Ohio. 



of Mis. Fowle 
tesigned. 

Mis. Hickej. 
man, was enthusiastic in hei report, 
telling of 14 new members this 
week from Wilmington alone, and 
for new ones from Winchester. 
After the February l r > meeting, 
the treasurer will send postal card 
acknowledgements to all paid 
members, reminding those who 
have joined the Friends in this first 
yeai that they are "charter mem- 
bers". Thi' Friends' year will cor- 
respond to the Hospital's - April 
30 to Mac 1. 

Nurse-' Aides Needed 

A nurses' aide course under the 
local Bed Cross chapter will start 
very soon, and women are urged to 
take advantage of this instruction. 
Aides are urgently needed at pies- 
ent at the Winchester Hospital. A 
number of volunteers ate working 
at present at the Hospital, but fai 
moie women could be used. 

Also needed arc Grav Ladies, and 



THERE'S MORE TO IT 
THAN MEETS THE EYE 

In the selection and fitting 
of artificial eyes nothing 
counts like years of ex- 
perience. Lectures and hooks 
can give some information 
but long experience in actual 
fitting, after-supervision un- 
der an experienced titter, is 
the ONLY safe, satisfactory 
road to success. 

Three to four weeks should 
elapse before an artificial eye 
is fitted to a new patient ainl 
then only an inexpensive 
temporary eye should be 
fitted and worn for at least 
six months to allow tissues 
in the eye socket to recede. 

In fitting permanent eyes, 
care must be taken regarding 
the type, area and fullness, 
together with the build-up to 
control the vertical angle of 
the eye. Again experience 
counts in matching the color 
of the sclera and of the iris, 
in color, size and location, 
and consideration must be 
given to the pupil size. 

Thousands of New Eng- 
enders have found comfort 
and satisfaction through the 
sei vice of Ara G, Besse of 
Winchester, ready to serve 
with counsel and guidance. 
Perfect Fitting and Matching 

SPENCER & BESSE 

LI 2-90.19 
120 Tremont St., Boston 



WINTER SHOP 



We have a host of things to -ell. 
You'll fin* I that here you're treated welt: 
Our Skis ami Pole- are what you like. 
W ith Bindings. Mitts, and Lacquers right. 

We have no sale-, w e -ell the he-t. 
Your dollar -pent here is your Test! 

Skating may be your biggest thrill. 
Our Skate- for men and women will 
Send yott over the smoothest iee, 
\nd give you a feeling that's really nice! 

If a Hoopster in your family there he. 
( hir "Reds" a-foot. above, "Crid Knee". 
Will save him many an ache and (tain: 
^ our Hoy'- Protection i- our aim. 

\nd when your youngsters want thing- to do. 
Our Model Shop"- the place for you. 
To keep them busy, free and gay. 
From Now until the Fir-t of May! 

WINCHESTER SPORT SHOP 



41 Church Street 



Winchester 6-1931 



Open 9 to 7 



OnDisplayTomorrow! 





NEW BEAUTY . . . New. different 
styling gives the '51 De Soto new 
glamour, from its massive new- 
front grille clear back to the new 
contour-type rear bumper. 

NEW POWER ... The new high- 
compression engine is bigger . . . 
more powerful! Gives smoother, 
more responsive performance 
whether you're maneuvering 



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NEW RIDE . . . The new Onflow 
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Come in today . . . and see the 
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LOOK AT THE EXTRA VALUE DESOTO GIVES YOU: 

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Don't miss GROUCHO MARX in You Bet Your Life" on both Radio and TV each week on all NBC stations. 

MASTER MOTORS, INC. 

808 Main Street - Winchester, Mass. 



a class in this work will bejrin on 
February 12, lied Cross super- 
vision. Thi* is a short, intensive 
course designed for those women 
who plan to work at the Winches- 
tei Hospital, and there are a few 



ir acWHi 



nal 



Mr. Paine \ Uit- 

Mr. Harlan Paine came into the 
nieetin.tr to .-peak briefly on the 
progress of the new hospital -- ex- 
plaining that "the minimum essen- 
tials will be purchased for the new 
hospital from the funds available. 
It is hoped that in additional con- 
tributions towards needed extras 
the Friends will be aide to assist 
matei ially". 

He was warm in his praise of 
the work of the Volunteer Services 
(Mi-. Howard A. Morrison and 
Mrs. Everett .Stone, chairmen) at 
the Hospital, Among his special 
tributes was one for the Gray 
Ladies who assist during visiting 
hours, and for the excellent clerical 
assistance. "In fact, all the groups 
working here are much appre- 
ciated"" he added. 

Mr. Paine also outlined the pos- 
sible use of the hospital in civil 
defense, preparing it to rare for 
200 casualties if necessary. In such 
an emergency, the muses' home 
would also be used — and in such 
A -Bomb event, volunteers would 
be desperately needed as aide* 



technicians, in the blood program, 
and others. Toward such, no mat- 
ter how fervently everyone hopes 
it may be avoided, the hospital 
wishes to be prepared, and hopes 
to have volunteers trained and 

Speaking after Mr. Paine. Mi,. 
Erskine White of the House Com- 
mittee uf the Hospital, told of pur- 
chasing chairs and materials now 
foi the new hospital, in the face of 
rising prUvs. 

Other Items 

The Winton Club has already 
; voted funds to purchase a new 
soda fountain for the coffee shop 
in the new hospital, and the gift 
shop will have larger quarters. 

.Nli*. Sanford Moses reported a 
sum of from the 'bridge praties, 
anil lfil) tickets available for 
"Thunder Hock" on February 1. 
riven to them by the Parish Play- 
ers. 

Members were reminded of the 
meeting February 15 at the Music 
Hall, with Mrs. Abraham Pinanski, 
speaker. 



« ON | VGIOl S DISEASES 

The following Contagious Dis- 
cus* s ucii- reported to the Board of 
Health for week ending Thursday, 
January IS, 1951; 

Pulmonary Tuberculosis 1 
Searelt Fever '-1 
William B. MaeDonald 

Agent, Hoard of Health 



f 

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THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY. JANUARY 26. 1951 



11 



join THE MARCH OF DIMES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASS A CHI.' SETTS 

Middlesex, »*. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
HAROLD BROADWELL BOWSE late of 

Winchester in naid County, de-ceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court, praying that ROSALIE LEON 
BOWNE of Winchester in said County, 
be appointed administratrix of said estate, 
without (riving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attornt-y should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten oVlork in the forenoon on the 
twelfth day of February. 1951, the return 
day of this citation. 

Witne&a, John C Leggat. Esquire. First 
Judge of «aid Court, this twenty-second 
day of January in the year one thousand 
nine hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Butler, Register 

jan26-Ht 



STONEHAM 

THEATRE 

Mat. 2 !'. M. 
Evening 6:30 P. M. *:30 P. M. 
Sunday Continuous 3 P. M. 

Now Thru Sat , Jan. 26 - 27 

Rurt Lancaster - Dorothy Maguire 
Edmund Gwenn 

MR. 880 
SUNSET IN THE WEST 

Son.. Mon.. Tur*.. Jan, 28. 29. 30 

Deborah Kerr - Stuart Granger in 

KING SOLOMON'S MINES 

Technicolor Feature 

FATHER MAKES GOOD 

Wed. - Review Day - Jan. .11 

W C Fields • Kdgai Bergen 

YOU CAN'T CHEAT AN 
HONEST MAN 

A! c o Richard Arlcn - Jack Carson 

LEGION OF LOST FLYERS 



STRHflD 



WOburn 2-0896 
Mat. 1:45 Eve. 6:50 Cont. 
Sat. Sun. Holidays Continuous 



NOW THRU SATURDAY 

KING SOLOMON'S MINES 

Deborah Kerr - Stewart Granger 

DESTINATION MURDER 

Stanley Clements - J. MarKenzie 



Sun., Mon.. Jan. 28, 29 

AMERICAN GUERRILLAS 
IN THE PHILIPPINES 

Tyrone Power - Mieheline Prelle 

YOUNG LOVERS 

Sally Forrent - K. Brasselle 

Tties.. Wed.. Jan. SO. SI 

OUTRAGE 

Mala Powers - Tod Andrews 

HOLIDAY AFFAIR 

Janet Leigh - Robert Mitehum 



Starts Thtirs.. Feb. 1 

THE WEST POINT 
STORY 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, sa. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
RICHARD S. TAYLOR late of Winchester 

t in said County, deceased 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court, praying that CHARLOTTE T. 
KING of Maiden in said County, be ap- 
pointed administratrix of said estate, with- 
I out giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the twenty- 
ninth day of January, 1951, the return day 
of this citation. 
', Witness. John C. Leggat. Esquire, First 
; Judge of said Court, this eighth day of 
: January in the year one tho sand nine 
j hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Butler. Register. 

janl2-3t 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHI SETTS 

Middlesex, sa. Probate Court. 

To at! persons interested in the estate of 
DONALD H. BERRIDIJE late of Winches- 
ter in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court, praying that MARVROSE B. Mc 
DEVITT of Winchester in said County, be 
appointed administratrix of said estate, 
without giving a surety on her bond 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
i your attorney should file n written appear- 
ance in said Court at Cambridge before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the twenty- 
ninth day at January 1961, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat. F.squire, First 
Judge of said Court, this fourth day of 
January in the yeat one thousand nine hun- 
dred and fifty-one. 

John J. liutler. Register. 

janl2-3t 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHI SETTS 

Middlesex, ss. I'robate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
MA UN DA A. SIMONDS late of Winches- 
ter in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court for probate of a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will of said de- 
ceased by LINDA F. HAMBI.IN of Acton 
in said County, praying that she be ap- 
pointed executrix thereof, without giving 
a surety on her bond 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the f,,renoon on the 
sixth day of February, 1961, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, John I'. Leggat, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this eleventh day of 
January in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Butler, Register. 

j»nl9-3t 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHI SETTS 

i Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 

FRANK J. HENNESSEY, late of Win- 
; Chester in said County, deceased. 
I The administrator of said estate has 
: presented to said Court his first and sec- 
' ond accounts for allowance and a petition 
' for distribution of the balance in his 

hands. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
fourteenth day of February. 1951, the re- 
turn day of this citation. 

Witness, John C Leggat, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this ninth day of 
January in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Butler, Register. 

janlMt 



FOR ALL THE NEWS 
READ THE STAR 



WI E . M . L O E W ' X 
INCHESTER 
fmHiHI.'M.ll!l*'.l*U'I'I 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. I 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
CHARLES H. DAVIS, late of Winchester 
in said County, decease!. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court for probate of a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will of said de- 
ceased by GERTRUDE L. DAVIS of Win- 
chester in said County, praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof, without giv- 
ing a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or , 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
thirtieth day of January 1951. the return ! 
day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat. F.squire. First 
Judge of said Court, this eighth day of 
January in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Butler, Register. 

janl2-3t ! 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, as. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the petition 
for adoption of ROBERT BRUCE GALE of 
Winchester in said County. 

A petition has been presented to said 
Court by CHARLES S. EATON and 
SARAH S. EATON, his wife of Winches- 
ter in said County, praying for leave to 
adopt said ROBERT BRUCE GALE, a 
child of DONALD SPRAGUE GALE of 
Rowayton in the State of Connecticut and 
SARAH S. GALE, his wife and that the 
name of said child be changed to ROBERT 
BRUCE EATON. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 1 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in sail Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
fifteenth day of February. 1951, the return 
day of this citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat. Esquire. First i 
Judge of said Court, this twelfth day of 
January in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-onu. 

John J. Butler, Register 

janl9-3t 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
M ASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
PATRICK IJUIGLEY late of Winchester in 
said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to said ' 
Court for probate of a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will of said de- 
ceased by PHILIP P. DEVER of Woburn 
in .aid County, praying that he be ap- 
pointed executor thereof. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
thirty-first day of January 1951, the re- 
turn day of this citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat. F.squire, First 
Judge of said Court, this fifth day of 
January in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one 

John J. Butler, Register 

janl2-3t 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. I 

To all persons interested in the trust 

estate under the will of GERTRUDE E. 

LYNCH late of Winchester in said County. 

deceased, for the benefit of JOHN A. 

LYNCH and OTHERS. 

The trustee of said estate has presented 

to said Court for allowance his first ac- 1 

count. 

If you desire to object thereto you or . 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the 
fifteenth day of February, 1951, the re- 
turn 'lay of this citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this eighteenth day of 
January in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-one. 

John J. Butler. Register 

jan26-:ft 

COMMONWEALTH ~OF~ 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
ELIZABETH ARMISTEAD late of Win- 
chester in said County, deceased. 

The administrator of said estate has pre- 
sented to said Court for allowance his first 
account. 

If you desire to object thereto you or \ 
your attorney should file a written ap- 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on the thirtieth 
day of January 1951, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, John C. Leggat. Esquire, First 
Judge of snid Court, this twenty-ninth day 
of December in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty. 

jan!2-:n j 




NOW... EVERYONE CAN ENJOY 




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COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex. 58. Probate Court. 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
GRACE E. ADAMS late of Winchester 
in said County, deceased. 

A petition ha-* I»een presented to said 
Court fur probate of a certain instrument 
purporting to be the last will of said de- 
cease.! by ARTHUR S. ADAMS of Dur- 
ham in the State of New Hampshire pray- '. 
ing that he be appointed execut. r thereof, 
without giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you or 
your attorney should ilia a written ap- ' 
pearance in said Court at Cambridge be- ' 
fore ten o'clock in the forenoon on the i 
thirteenth day of February. 1951, the re- j 
turn day of this citation. 

Witness. John C. Leggat. F.squire, First 
Judge of said Court, this twenty-third day j 
of January in the year one thousand nine ! 
hundred and fifty-one 

John J. Butler. Register 

jan'2t!-''.t 

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NOW THIU' SATURDAY 
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Sat.. Jan L'7 at 10:1,0 A M 
Judy t. inland 

THK \* IZARD OK OZ 



"Football Highlights" 

Pirates on the High Seas No. II 

San Mon.. Tues . Jan 2s. 29. SO 
James Stewart 

THK JACKPOT 

Joseph (often - Valli 

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SF.K 2 FEATURES LATE AS « P. M. 
TODAY THR1' SATI'RDAY 

MAT. 2 F. M. EVE. CONT. FROM (5:30 

Joseph Cotten - Linda Darnell 

TWO FLAGS WEST 

Cornell Wilde - Jeff Chandler 
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FULLER BRUSH GIRL 

Lucille Hall 



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IN ADDITION TO KF.C.l'LAR 
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W ed. — Review Day — Jan. 31 
Joseph Cotten - Orson Welles 

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Betty Hatton - Macdonald Carey 

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MON. - TUES. MAT STARTS 
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Thurs.. Fri., Feb. 1. 2, S 
Gary Cooper - Rath Roman 

DALLAS 



Alec Uuinnegs - Dennis Price 

KIND HEARTS AND 
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Continuous Daily from 1 :30 



SUN. - MON - TUES. 
Jan. 2*. 20, :*0 
June Haver - William I.undi&*an 

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Gloria DeHaven - Dennis Day 
Harry James 

In TECHNICOLOR 
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Elizabeth Taylor 

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Jan. 81, Feb. 1, 2. ;; 
Ray Milland - Hedy Lamarr 

COPPER CANYON 

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I.izabeth Scott - Don DeFore 

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Deborah Kerr 
Stewart Granger 

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James Cagnev 

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Virginia Mayo 
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John Wayne 
Marsha Hunt 

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NEXT SUN , MON., TUES, 
James Stewart 
Barbara Halt- 
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STAR ADS 
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I 



TOWN OF WINCHESTER 

WARRANT FOR TOWN 
MEETING 

• ORDERED: That the war- 
rant for the Annual Repre- 

| tentative Town Meeting to 

j be held in March 1951 be 

, closed at 4:30 o'clock P. M. 

J on Monday, January 29, 1951 

j and that public notice thereof 

. be given by publication of 

! this order in the three (3) 

I consecutive issues of the 

- "Winchester Star" preceding 

! said date. 

Vincent Farnsworth, Jr. 
I Harry E. Chefalo 
j Richard ('. Cunningham 

' Nicholas H. Fitzgerald 

| Harrison F. Lyman, Jr. 

Selectmen of Winchester 

| janl2-3t 
C — - 



The following list of cases of 
Contagious Diseases was reported 
to the Board of Health for week 
ending, Thursday, January 25: 
New Dwelling:: 

20 Lebanon street west 
22 Lebanon street west 
24 Lebanon street west 
28 Lebanon street west 
92 Lawson road 
7 James street 
42 Win ford Wav 

44 Winford Wav 

45 Winford Way 

46 Winford Wav 
48 Winford Way 

Alterations to Dwelling: 

18 Prospect street 
Reshingle: 

92 Church street 



REELS • 35c each 
3 for '1.00 




[ ; Pike's Peak, Colo. 

□ Rural Connecticut 
P Miami Beach, Fla. 

□ Sun Valley, Idaho 

□ Chicago, Illinois 
[J Mardi Gras, La. 
P Maine Seacoast 

□ U. S. Naval Academy 

□ Bojton, Mast. 

□ Upper Michigan 

□ Duluth, Minnesota 

□ White Mts., N. H. 

□ Hoover Dam, Nevada 

□ Navajo Indians 

□ Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

□ New York City 

□ Philadelphia. Penna. 

□ Ml. Hood. Oregon 

□ Charleston, S. C. 

□ Black Hills, S. D. 

□ San Antonio, Te«as 

□ Salt lake City, Utah 

□ Vermont Stole 



NATIONAL 
PARKS 

□ Bryce Canyon 

□ Carlsbad Caverns 

□ Death Valley 

□ Glacier 

□ Grand Canyon 

□ Grand Teton 

□ Great Smoky Mts. 
[ ] Petrified Forest 

□ Rainier 

□ Rocky Mountain 

□ Sequoia 
Yellowstone 

□ Yosemite 

□ Zion 

CANADA 

[j Victoria, B. C. 

□ Jasper Pork 

f_j Banff Lake Louise 



f~] Montreal, Quebec 
Q Quebec City 

LATIN AMERICA 

[~1 Menico City 

("1 Poricutin Volcano 

P Mexican Bullfight 

[J Guatemala City 

l~i Island of Bermuda 

[j Hovona. Cuba 

f~! Lima, Peru 

P Santiago, Chile 

□ Rio De Janeiro, Bratil 
f ' Buenos Aires, 

Argentina 

EUROPE 

□ London, Englond 
P Poris, France 

QJ Tipperary. Ireland 

□ St. Peter's Basilica 

□ Rome, Italy 

P Matterhorn, Switt. 

ASIA AND 
AFRICA 

□ Cairo, Egypt 

□ Pyramids ond Sphinn 

□ Taj Mahal, India 

□ Siamese Dances 



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p Hong Kong, China 

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p Jerusalem. Palestine 
P Tel Aviv, Israel 
p Damascus, Syria 

SOUTH PACIFIC 

□ Sydney. Australia 
[J The Maoris, 

New Zealand • 
[J Manila, Philippine! 

CHILDREN'S 
REELS 

□ Gene Autry 

P Hopalong Cass-dy 

□ Cisco Kid 
Lj Roy Rogers 
I I Fairy Tales 

f*l Mother Goose Rhymes 

P The Easter Story 

P Adventures of Tarron 

□ Sam Sawyer's 
Adventures 

□ Wild Animals 

□ Performing Elephants 



a Ml 




MEDIC AL SOCIETY 
AUXILIARY TO MEET 



A luncheon meeting of the Wo- 
men's Auxiliary to the Middlesex 
Fast District Medical Society will 
be held on Thursday, February 1st 
at the Winchester Country Club at 
1 p. m. 

Following the luncheon and busi- 
ness meeting Mrs. Elizabeth Whit- 
ney, Executive Director of Boston 
Committee on Alcoholism, will 
speak on the subjljfct of "Alco- 
holism and Community Action". It 
is urgent that all members of the 
auxiliary attend. 



COMMERCIAL PRINTING 



OF ALL KINDS 



CHAMOIS SKI CLUB 




Don't forget the next meeting of 
the Chamois Ski (Tub has been \ 
moved up from the usual first Wed- 
nesday in the month to Wednesday 
night, January 31, in order to con- I 
tinue plans for the Square Dance 
and to discuss the projected week- 
end at Mount Pero in Plymouth. 
As usual, the place is Chandler's 
Barn on Forest street, and there 
will be excellent entertainment and 
refreshments. Don't forget this 
meeting, because it is a very im- 
portant one! 



REGISTRATION 

FOR MEN and WOMEN 



The Registrars of Voters will be 
in session at the Office of the Town 
Clerk. Town Hall, on the following 
days: 

MONDAY, February 12. 7:30 to 
9 P. M. 

TUESDAY, February 13, 8:30 
A. M. to 10 P. M. 

and also at any time during office 
hours of the Town Clerk. 



TAKE NOTICE 

By law, Registration in THIS 
TOWN will cease Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 13, 1951 at 10 o'clock p. m., 
after which no names will be added 
to the voting list until after the 
Town Election on March 5, 1951. 

Every man or woman whose 
name is not on the voting list, in 
order to be registered as a voter 

1 must appear in person before the 
Registrars of Voters at one of the 
sessions above mentioned, except, 

• in accordance with Chapter 531, 
Acts of 1948, and Chapter 715, Acts 

■ of 1945. Each man or woman must 
also have been a legal resident of 
Massachusetts for at least one year 
and a legal resident of Winchester 
fot at icast six months prior to 
the next election. 

Naturalized persons must bring 
their papers of naturalization and 
persons claiming citizenship 
1 through a naturalized person must 
In ing proof of citizenship. 

HOWARD S. COSGROVE 
GEORGE J. BARBARO 
HARRY J. DONOVAN 

MABEL W STINSON 

Registrars of Voters, 
of Winchester. Mass. 

j«n26-3t 



Over the past week-end four 
panes of glass were broken in the 
garage of the shop being built by 
Whitten Brothers, builders, on 
White street. The windshield of a 
truck in the garage was also 
broken. The police were notified. 




To the Board of Appeal 
Winchester, Massachusetts 

January 22, 1951 

The undersigned being the 
owner of a two (2) family 
house located at 129-131 
Washington Street, in a gen- 
eral residence district estab- 
lished by the Zoning By-Law, 
hereby makes application for 
permission to alter the afore- 
said house for a three (3) 
family use. 

Dora Grimes 

Town of Winchester 
The Board of Appeal 

January 22, 1951 
Upon the foregoing appli- 
cation, it is hereby OR- 
DERED: That a public hear- 
ing be held thereon in the 
Building Commissioner's of- 
fice, 9 Mt. Vernon Street, on 
Tuesday, February 13, 1951 
at eight P. M. and that four- 
teen days notice thereof be 
given, at the expense of the 
applicant by publishing a 
copy of said application, to- 
gether with the order, in the 
Winchester Star, on January 
26, 1951, that notice thereof 
be given to the owners of all 
land within one hundred feet 
of said premises, by mailing 
to them, postage prepaid a 
copy of said application and 
order, and that a copy of said 
application be posted in a 
conspicuous location upon 
said premises 

By order of the Board of 
Appeal 

Gilman Wallace, Chrni. 
Frank W. Howard 
Edward V, French 



\ . / 




IETTERHEADS 






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BILLHEADS 

* 






ENVELOPES 




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INVITATIONS 






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RECEIPTS 






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TICKETS 




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PROGRAMS and PAMPHLETS 



) 




THE WINCHESTER STAR 



3 Church Street 



Tel. WI 6-0029 



12 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, JANUARY 26. 1951 



»••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 

Are Your Savings 
Earning You 

INTEREST? 



•••s 




FOR SALE 



Custom built house with every modern convenience, 
Deluding Dendix an! ironev. Large living room with 
picture win.. a. T ;e> bedrooms and lavatory on first 
!'\vo bedtooms and tilt i btth on second. Cameroon) with 
i in basement. Forced hot watei heat, Garatre. Seldom 
ave a house so ell bull* and perfectly planned for modern 



RUTH C. PORTER Realtor 

33 THOMPSON STREET 

W inchester 6-1310 Evening, Winchester fi-2'Hti — fi :Ufis 

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OUR PAID UP COOPERATIVE 
BANK SHARES ARE 

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INCHES1ER 




WINCHESTER HOMES 

, Pleasing individuality is effectively displayed in six room 

I Home. Tiled bath and lavatory. Oil Heat. One Car Garage. 
Complete insulation. Delightfully located on lot with fine old 
trees. $20,000. 

Unusual Value in building lot. 9,000 feet of land on finished 
street. Garage already built. For immediate sale. $2,200. 

VERNON W. JONES 

HEAL ESTATE 
Twenty-sixth Year in Winchester 
National Hank Huilding Winchester 6-0S9S or 6-1163 

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i 

j — 



WINCHESTER 6-0035 

VINE AND ELM WOOD AVE. 
WINCHESTER 



FOR SALE 

Charming Colonial in convenient neighborhood, Three bed- 
joms, bath. Garage. $20,000. 



Income property 



ss district. Shown by appointment. 



FESSENDEN 

KATHHVN I'. SULLIVAN. Realtor 
3 Common Street 
Winchester 6-09>>4— 6-2770— 6-21 37-R— 6-345 1—6-13 1< 

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F. C Rivinius&Co. 

INSURANCE 



Hiin| rf 

1 fit P 



19 CHURCH STREET. WINCHESTER 

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INSURE 
AGAINST FIRS 



Luther W. Puffer, 
Jr., Inc. 

557 Main Street 

Winchester 
Winchester 6-1980 

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FOR SALE 

Two Family House, very good location close to center. Owner 
being transferred. Six looms on first floor, seven looms on second 
floor, Asking $16,000. 

P. T. FOLEY & CO. 



Realtors and Insurance 



2 Mt. Vernon Street 



Winchester 6-1 192 



1 Is State St. 
Boston, Mass, 
LA 3-3730 



15 Church St. 
Winchester 
WI 6-326S 



WEST SIDE 

Exceptionally well-built and well planned Ranch home. 
Cabinet kitchen, cheerful dining room with bay window, extra 
large living room with picture window and fireplace. Center hall. 
3 twin-size bedrooms, large closets tile bath and shower. H, W. 
oil heat. Two-car attached garage. Large lot of land. Asking 
$28,500 

MURRAY & GILLETT, Realtors 



Winchester 6-2560 



1 Thompson Street 

Eves. Winchester 6-1992, 6-2621, 6-2313 



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Anne Rhinitis ^ il<l. Broker 

ma!S-tf 



JOHN B. MERCURI0 

1 Mt. Vernon Street 
Insurance and Real Estate 
Tel. Winchester 6-3400 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 

We Go — W'inton Club Cabaret 
at Town Hall tonight and Satur- 
day night. Balcony tickets 90 
cents. Box office open at 7:45 
p. m. 

Mrs. John L. Aver of Stetson 
Hall is now making her home at 2.'i 
Arlington road, VVoburn. 

For Fuel Oil. Phone Fitzgerald 
Fuel Co., Winchester 6-3000. 

o5-tf 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Smalley 
of 2 Winchester Place are moving 
to Laconia, N. H,, Mrs. Smalley 
was formerly the Church Secretary 
of the Unitarian Church. 

Spencer Supports individually de- 
signed, cut and made for you: fash- 
ion and health supports; doctors' 
prescriptions filled. Mrs. Irene D. 
Sittinger, WI 6-1575. 

jan26-3t' 

Born to Mr, and Mrs. Ray T. 
Heizer, Jr., (Harriet Squires i of 
Chicago, a son, Theodore Squires 
Heizer. on January 18th. The 
grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Ray 
T. Heizer of Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry N. Squires. Jr., 
of Winchester. Mr. Arthur W. 
Dean is the great grandparent. 

A collection of the latest style 
hats for all occasions at Miss 
Ekman's, 15 Church street. Also 
tweed hats made. »8-tf 

Friends of Lt. Galen K. Ben- 
jamin, U. S. N. K., will be glad to 
know he is having a speedy re- 
covery following an appendectomy 
at the Bethesda Naval Hospital. 
Bethesda, Maryland, on January 
20th. Lt. Benjamin is the husband 
of the former Marion Neiley, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey 
C. Neiley, 63 Yale street. Lt. and 
Mrs. Benjamin are at present re- 
siding at 8105 University Lane, 
Silver Spring, Maryland. He is on 
duty at the Naval Communications 
Station, Washington. D. C. 

Mary Yen's Candy now for sale 
at Sophie Bowman's Office, 45 
Church street. jal2-tf 

Benjamin P. Coe. (formerly of 
Winchester), son of Adm. Ben- 
jamin Coe of 1937 Fifth street, 
San Diego, Calif., has been elected 
Vice-President of his fraternity, 
Kappa Sigma, at Bowdoin College, 
He is a member of the Junior Class. 

For experienced service or re- 
pairs on ail makes of sewing 
machines or vacuum cleaners, call 
E. W. Clark, Winchester 6- 
0140-W*. augU-tf 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 

Here — Winton Club Cabaret at 
Town Hall tonight and Saturday 
night. Balcony tickets 90 cents. Box 
office open at 7:45 p. m. 

The Fire Department was called 
at 9:30 Sunday evening to put out a 
chimney fire and a power oil burn- 
er afire at the Bienn home, 10 
Maple road. 

Tax Commissioner Henry F. 
Long has assigned a deputy to take 
tax returns at the General Com- 
mittee Room at the town hall on 
February 6. from 9:30 a. in. to 1 
p. m., and from 2 p. m. to 4 p. m. 

dec22-tf 

Mr, and Mrs. Virgil Ghirardini 
are registered at the Ponce de Lon 
Hotel in DeLand, Florida for the 
month of February. 

Call Ed Lynch for prompt re- 
moval of rubbish. Winchester 6- 
3516. slO-tf 

Private Finest t erra, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Cerra of <>4 Pun- 
ster Lane has been assigned to a 
unit of the famous 2nd Armored 
Division at Ft. Hood. Texas for 
training. 

Again — Winton Club Cabaret at 
Town Hall tonight and Saturday 
night. Balcony tickets 90 cents. Box 
office open at 7:45 p. m. 

The Ladies' Lodge of S. O. 1. is 
sponsoring a dance to be held at 
Columbus Hall on Raymond Place 
on Saturday, January 27. 

A Classified Ad in the Star 
brings Results. 

i SUCCESSFUL BRIDGE AND 
WHIST 




OPEN FOR INSPECTION 



Sunday, January 2*\ 2-5 P. M. 

New home at 22 Kenwin road, Winchester. 
This is a quality house, built by day labor, using 
very best material, 5 rooms on lii'st floor, additional 
rooms available on second floor, open porch. Fully 
insulated, forced hot water heat, beautiful, large lot. Easy terms 
available. 

G. A. JOSEPHSON - Real Estate - Mortgages 

5 Church Street (Star Building) 
Tel. W inchester 6-2126 Evening*. W Inchester 6-1847-M 

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RESIDENCE and At TOMOBII E 
FIRE .-ind LIABILITY 

INSURANCE 

Ilirert Locnl Afffnt — Strong 
Companies 

VV. ALLAN WILDE 

3 ThompMm St. Winchester 6-H00 

dec29-tf 



WILLIAM $. WOLSEY 

Builder 

Winchester 6-1336 



myl2-tf 



EIGHTH DISTRICT 
PRESIDENTS' CLUB 



HEART CAMPAIGN 



The bridge and whist party held 
Thursday evening in the Noonan 
school hall for the Immaculate 
Conception Church Building Fund 
was a great success. 

Much credit is due to the com- 
mittee in charge of the affair, who 
consisted of: 

The Mesdames, Mary Marshall, 
Loretta Thomas. Gertrude Clappi- 
son, Jennie Flaherty, Lorraine 
Carey, Sabina Median. Alice Boyle. 
Catherine Haley, Eileen Garvey, 
Kmalme Munroe, Mary Mooney, 
Elizabeth O'Donnell. Eleanor Free- 
Ian, Marian MacDonald, Elizabeth 
Doherty, Emma Murphy and the 
Misses Angle Tortolano. Marion 
McLaughlin, Edythe Haggerty, 
Mary Meehan, Mildred Clappison 
and Kathrvn McLaughlin. 



At a recent meeting of the Exe- 
cutive Board of the Eighth District 
! Presidents' club held at the home of 
the President, Mrs. .lames C Sun- 
derland of Maiden there were ten 
members who enjoyed her coffee 
hour and hospitality. They were 
the following: Mrs. G. Taimadge 
Erb and Mrs. John Foster of Mai- 
den, Mrs. Edmund A. Arnold and 
| Mrs. Benjamin P. Bill of Melrose, 
! Mis. S. Alton Ward and Mrs. 
George C, Dunnells of Woburn, 
I Mrs. Harold H. Given of Winches- 
[-ter, Mi-. II. Raymond Johnson of 
Reading, and Mis. Norman R. 
Houghton of Stoneham. 

Plans were made foi the Mid- 
winter Meeting to be held on Tues- 
day, January 30, 1951 at Corinthian 
Hall, Franklin street, Melrose 
Highlands, The Melrose Club, Mi s. 

H. Maxwell Phinney, President, 
and the Highlands Club, Mrs. Au- 
gustus L. Button, President, are 

to be the hostesses. The guests of 
honor are Mrs. Lewis C. Stevens, 
President of the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Women's Clubs 
and Mrs. D. Taimadge Fib, Eighth 
District Director. 

Luncheon will be served at 12:30 
p. m. Preceding the 2 o'clock 
business meeting there will be a 
sale of home-cooked food. The 
entertainment for the afternoon 
will be presented by the Dramatic 
Club of the hostess club. 

CAPTAIN FREDERICK J. 
DONAHUE BACK IN THE 
ARMY 




hlQUOR C 

Formerly CrVtFooci Co. 

139 My*tU Av«.,M«dtordL 

Plenty of Fnec Parking- Open 9am. to 11 pt£ 
free deliwryMY»ti< 6-5107 



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INSTITUTED 

to serve you on all 
>our rugs needs 

Call 

Winchester 6-0654 
34 Church Stre«t 



EXPANDED 

To give you even 

Better Service 

Our new, large and efficient 
Hug Cleaning plant for 
Cleaning, Repairing and 
Storing of your rugs. 

- MOURADIAN 

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A Winchester Officer now serv- 
ing in the Armed Forces of the 
United States is Captain Frederick 
J. Donahue, Jr., who entered his 
cm rent tour of active duty as a 
volunteer Reservist from the 
Transportation Training Division, 
San Francisco, California, in July, 
1 950. Captain Donahue has been 
assigned to the General Staff 
Corps, effective September IT, 1950, 
for duty with the Manpower Con- 
trol Division of the Office of the 
Chief of Staff, Department of 
Army. Pentagon. Washington. 

A veteran of World War II, Cap- 
tain Donahue originally enlisted as 
a Private April Id. 1942 in Boston, 
and served initially with the In- 
fantry, later with the Armored 
Force, being discharged August 5, 
1-94(1 at Fort Devens, Mass. Wit- 
nessing over thirty months of over- 
seas duty in the Pacific Theatre of 
Operations, Captain Donahue was 
Company Commander in a cited 
tank battalion and an expert on 
amphibious tactics in joint Army- 
Navy-Marine Corps operations. He 
holds the Bronze Star Medal. Army 
Commendation Ribbon, citations 
from the President of the I'. S. and 
the Philippine Republic, in addition 
to combat experience in four major 
Pacific Battles. Captain Donahue 
lists his home addie.-s as 15 Mystic 
avenue. 



A committee meeting of The 
American Heart Association of 
Winchester was held Monday. Jan- 
uary 22nd, to formulate plans for 
coming events to be sponsored by 
the Association. 

It is planned to hold a Cake and 
Food Sale, Saturday, February 10th 
at Filene's Winchester Center 
store, at 10:00 a. m. Mrs. Robert C. 
Scott. Chairman of this event, an- 
nounces that many promises of 
cakes and foodstuffs have been 
forthcoming throughout Winches 
ter. Anyone wishing to contribute 
a cake or foodstuffs should contact 
Mrs. Scott at WI (i-2354. "You 
know we are coming, so please 
bake a cake." 

An activity is planned which will 
appeal to the "Small Fry," in the 
form of a Wild West Movie, "Law 
of The Valley" starring Johnny 
Mac Brown, with several accom- 
panying cartoons and a sport reel. 
The movie will be shown at the 
Town Hall at 10:00 a. m. Feb- 
ruary 21st, during school vacation. 
All mothers interested will kind- 
ly contact the Chairman Mrs. K. J. 
Ingraham at WI 6-3183. 

lt is hoped all the townspeople 
will turn out for the Barn Dance 
scheduled for Saturday, February 
24th, at the Town Hall. There will 
be square dancing as well as reg- 
ular dancing, so wear your "ole" 
clothes. 

Anyone with artistic ability who 
wishes to contribute his services, 
should contact Mrs. W. L. Mc- 
Kenzie, General Chairman, at WI 0. 
008(1. Posters are needed to fore- 
cast each event, and your coopera- 
tion will be appreciated. 

The enthusiasm shown by the 
committee members and all others 
who have banded together to make 
this Heart Campaign a success is 
niost gratifying. Much fun is in 
the offing for our Winchester 
folks, and at the same time ,we will 
be aiding a very good cause. "If 
you have a heart, help save a 
heart." 

NEW ( I LIZ FN 

To Mi. and Mrs. Harold S. Ful- 
lei , Jr., of Keen. , N. 1L, a first 
child, Patricia Lee, January IT, at 
the Elliot Community Hospital in 
Keene. Grandparents are Mr. and 
Mrs. Harold S. Fuller of Hancock, 
N. IL, formerly of this town. 



See your Eye Physician 
and 

^4rtkur ^K. Smith 
(juifJ Optician 

126 Main St. Tel. WOburn 2-1704 

mal3-t( 

AMERICAN LEGION 
AUXILIARY 

All Auxiliary members are urged 
to come and bring their friends to 
the Bridge and Whist to be held at 
the Legion Home on Monday even- 
ing. January 2!', at 8 p. m. Co- 
chairmen Lola Bennett and Sally 
Meek are planning on a large at- 
tendance and will appreciate your 
contribution of prizes. 

(•ur first dance of the year will 
be the Valentine Dance on Satur- 
day evening, February lit, at the 
Legion Home. The energetic com- 
mittee is working to make this a 
big success and need the support 
of every member, so make plans 
now to be there and join in the fun. 
The Committee includes: Dot Car- 
roll, Chairman; Barbara Murphy, 
Dot McCormick, Dot Lynch, Helen 
Hannon and Mary Humphrey. 

Remember — County Council at 
Tewksbury on Saturdav, January 
27 at 12:30 p. m. Make an effort 
to attend and represent your Win- 
chester Unit. If you need trans- 
portation call Unit President Rita 
Meek and she will arrange it. 



DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY 
HELPS FINANCE SENIOR 
DOINGS 



"Death Takes A Holiday", writ- 
ten by Alberto Casilla and rewrit- 
ten for the American stage by Wal- 
ter Ferris, will be presented by the 
senior and junior classes of Win- 
chester High School on Saturday 
evening. February 17, at 8:15 in 
the High School auditorium. 

A cast of four seniors and nine 
juniors, chosen last month by Mr. 
Thomas Morse, speech teacher and 
dramatic coach at the high school, 
has been rehearsing steadily since 
then. 

The net proceeds of this annua! 
production are divided equally by 
the treasuries of the junior and 
senior classes, and are used to help 
finance the Junior-Senior prom, 
Class Night, Graduation, and Class 



A welcome ( Hanoi: 



We hear a lot about juvenile de- 
linquency here in Winchester and 
it is refreshing to record an item 
on the reverse side of the picture. 
A prominent citizen told us this 
week that upon arriving at his 

i home the other day he found that a 
window had been broken. Later, 
upon opening his front door he 
found a slip of paper tucked 
beneath, it, and inside was a dollar 
bill and a note reading "here is a 

, dollar. 1 broke your window ." The 
note was unmistakable as that 
of a small boy - spelling and writ- 
ing. Evidently we still have some 
parents who bring their children up 
right - and some children who take 

itheir instructions to heait. 



Remember 

OPERATION PORCHLIGHT 

THE MOTHERS' MARCH 
on 

POLIO 

TURN ON YOUR PORCHLIGHT 

7 TO 8 P. M.. WEDNESDAY, 
JANUARY 31. 1951 

WINCHESTER MARCH OF DIMES COMMITTEE 



FOR SALE 

— EXCELLENT LOCATION — 

1st Flooi Living-room, dining room, long heated sun room 
( kitchen i 

2nd Floor 4 Bedrooms - Bath Hot Water Oil Heat 

3rd Floor - 2 Bedrooms — Bath Beautiful Corner Lot 

PRICE TO SETTLE ESTATE — SIk.000 

SOPHIE BOWMAN 

45 Church Street 
Winchester 6-2575 — fi-0795 (davs) 
Winchester fi-.'l27> — 6-19fifi evenings and Sundays 
SEE US FOR MORTGAGES AND INSURANCE 



Join THE MARCH OF DIMES 




We are pleased to announce 
that 

KM HARD M. RUSH 

6 WOODSIDE ROAD 

is now associated with this firm as (ho 
WINCHESTER REPRESENTATIVE 

Mr. Rush has been a re*i<loiil of \\ inchester 
lor inanj years ami active in the real estate 
business He i- now able to offer von greater 
service in Winchester ami surrounding com- 
munities through the .-tal.li-hed facilities of 

frjattliew Iff], (Lox (Lompanij 

- REALTORS - 

MELROSF. MASS. 



6-1 122 




CHAS. C. NICHOLSON 

— BUILDER — 

BUILDING - REMODELING — REPAIRING 
ROOFING - SIDEWALLS 

New Homes Built to Your Specifications 

42 Union St. Tel. WOburn 2-0609 Woburn 

31 Years Experience 



Tel. Winchester 6-1271 



Res. Winchester 6-3388-W 



FRED'S HOME SERVICE 

A complete home maintenance servim 
for your convenience. 

For your comfort and relaxation, new wallpaper or a sof* 
pastel color paint will make a big difference in your home. 

Call us for an estimate 

We do any job around the home — none too large or too -mall. 

janl2-li 



Kelley and Hawes Co. 

Established 1877 

Packers and Movers 

-: STORAGE :- 

SEMI-WEEKLY TRIPS 
MAINE. NEW HAMPSHIRE. CONNECTICUT, 
NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA. WASHINGTON. 



MAIN OFFICE 
5 PARK STREET. WINCHESTER 

Winchester 6-1477 

Formerly Winchester 6-0174 

CHAIRS and TABLES 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



BONDED AND INSURED CARRIERS 



ma'.3-tf 



PUBLIC LIBRARY, 



THE WINCHESTER STAR. 



VOL. LXX NO. 24 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2. 1951 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



WI.VTON ( I.I P. ( ABARF'I 



U KIT/ 



IM)l ( ETTE 



Club Cabaret, a 
among the social 



The Winton 
great favorite 

an'i charity minded eitissens of 
Winchester, returned to the Town 
Ha!) last Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday night with large au- 
diences on all nights applauding 
the talents of Winchesterites. 

The predicted snow storm of three 
to four inches didn't materialize, 
and the Weatherman gave the 
spectators a nice, crisp, evening to 

arrive at the show without the 
benefit of eumhersome footwear 
This gala event was anticipated foi 
many week- and there was much 
entertaining on both Friday and 
Saturday nights before and aftei 
the show. The hall was beautifully 
decorated under the chairmanship 
of Mrs. Samuel B. Kirkwood, and 
there was a particularly gorgeous 
curtain that was used as a hack- 
drop for the orchestra, which was 
playing on the stage this year. Al 
Navarro led Ruby Newman's or- 
chestra, which furnished excellent 
accompaniment for the show ano 
the dancing which followed. 

The Cabaret committee was head 
ed by Mrs. Charles W. Butler, and 
included Mrs. Thomas Aldrich, Jr., 
Mrs. Harry 1\ Hood, Jr., Mrs 
Vnughan Harmon, Mrs. Clarence 
M.-Davitt, Jr., and Mrs. Carrick 1) 
Kennedy. This group put in many, 
many hour- of hard work getting 
a cast together and seeing that the 
rehearsals went off as they should, 
and a thousand and one little 
things that go to putting on a show 
as successful as this one was. 

"Here We (Jo Again", was not 
just the "annual Cabaret"; it was 
the Club's 30th endeavor, under 
the very able leadership and direc- 
tion of Richard R. Rector of the 
Charles H. Blake Productions of 
Hollywood. There was original 
music by Peter Selby, Edward Red- 
ding, Alex Forarty and William 
Wheeler, 2nd. Original lyrics were 
by Bill Howe, Gloria Cordon and 
J a m e s Ycnable. Lighting by 
George T. McAleenan and Make-up 
by Murl Daniels. 

The cast was quite a large one. 
and their splendid performances 
were a credit to all. The soloists 
were well received and much en 
joyed: the specialty acts were en- 
thusiastically applauded and the 
dancing choruses were a pleasure 
to watch so well were they matched 
in their routine. The show was fast 
and snappy, and one number fol- 
lowed the other in rapid succession 
The opening number was the 
perennial favorite, The Winton 
Club Drill. They did it a little 
differently this year; instead of it 
being in the military vein it was 
done as sort of a dance, 
were well received and they 
very chic in their short 
dark tops, and tall silk hats 
had a chorus to usher them 
their voices and the souk were very 
much applauded. 

Mrs. John Ghirardini followed by 
sinping "I Need A Man Around". 
It was sung in a beautiful low tone, 
that captivated all the audience.-. 
It wouldn't surprise me if that song 
wouldn't be on the lips of many in 
the weeks to come. It went ovei 
with a bang! 

The next number was is gay and 
fresh as its title. "Summer Show- 
ers" was sung as a duet by Lucia 
Ann Wright and Charles Lovejoy, 
They were both prepared for a 
shower, for they wore raincoats, 
with Lucia Ann carrying an um- 
brella. Thi dancers also carried 
umbrellas with their blue costumes 
and their routine was very festive 
The tap solo by Marguerite Derro 
was well executed and there was a 
grand round of applause that fol- 
lowed. 

Scene Four was a quartette of 
young men singing "Happy As A 
Lark" and they certainly were. It 
was very well sung and as well re- 
ceived. 

They went back a few years for 
the next number, the "Winton Club 
Can Can". This was done by a 
group of six Winton Club members, 
and they sure went through theii 
steps in a lively fashion. 

Scene six was a guy and refresh- 



Miss Ann 
daughter of Mr. 
T. Doucette of 
was married to 
Heitz, Jr., son 



Eunice Doucette. 
and Mi-. Charles 
Middlesex street, 
Henry Carpenter 

of Mr. and Mrs. 



ALTERS VIE PL A N JOB 
SCHOOLS VOTED AGAIN 



MRS EDITH ( LARK NEW ELL 



Henry C. Heitz of Hill street, at St. 
Mary'- Church on Saturday after- 
noon, January 20. Bouquets . of 
white snapdragons decorated the 
altar for the 4 o'clock ceremony 
which was performed by the pas- 
tor, Rev. Fr. John P. O'Riordan. 
Miss Mary Callahan played the 
bridal music and the soloist was 
Arnold Callahan, lyric tenor. 

Miss Doucette was given in mar- 
riage by her father, and attended 
by her sister, Mrs. John C. Rafferty 
of Winchester. The bride wore a 
gown of white satin with a high 
neckline and a lace bertha, the 
skirt being styled with a bustle and 
a long train. Her fingertip-length 
veil was edged with lace and caught 
to a satin cap trimmed with seed 
pearls, and she carried a white 
missal with a bride's orchid and 
streamers of stephanotis. 
I Mrs. Rafferty wore a blue chif- 
fon and lace dress with a crown 
of matching blue flowers and a 
shoulder-length veil. She carried 
an old fashioned bouquet. 

Robert Heitz of Winchestei was 
best man for his brother, and the 
ushers were John McHugh and Ed- 
ward Haggerty, both of Winches- 
ter. 

A reception was held after the 
ceremony at Knights of Columbus 
Hall in Winchester, the parents of 
both the bride and bridegroom as- 
sisting in receiving with the mem- 
bers of the bridal party. Mrs. Dou- 
cette, mother of the bride, was 
gowned in toast brown, with which 
she wore lavender accessories and 
an orchid corsage. Mrs. Heitz, 
mother of the bridegroom, also 
wore orchids with her peacock blue 
gown and accessories of grey. 

After a wedding trip to New 
York Mr. and Mrs. Heitz will make 
their home in Winchester. Both 
the bride and bridegroom are grad- 
uates of Winchester High School 
with Mrs. Heitz graduating from 
Burdett College Evening School. 
Mr. Heitz, who is a member of the i 
Winchester Fire Department, grad- 
uated from Industrial Technical 
School. 



Precinct delegates at Monday 
evening's special session of the 
limited town meeting voted again 
for the School Building Commit- 



ELKS TO FETE EXALTED 
RULER 



They 
ooked 
skirts, 
. They 
in, and 



Winchester Lodge, 1445, is plan- 
ning to send a large delegation to 
the reception and dinner which the 
Massachusetts State Elks Associa- 
tion is giving in honor of the Grand 
Exalted Ruler. Hon. Joseph B. 
Kyle, P. E. R„ of Gary, Ind. Lodge 
1152, at the Hotel Copley Plaza in 
Boston < n Mondav evening, Feb. 19. 
Exalted Ruler Carl E. Getchell and 
Pa«t Exalted Ruler Charles A. Far- 
rar, H. I.. M., trustee of the State 
Association, will head the Winches- 
tei delegation and their ladies. 

Winchestei has been honored by 
having its Past Exalted Ruler 
Harry A. McGrath, H. I.. M., 
P. D. D. (i. E. R.. act as toastmas- 
ter for the dinner which will com. 
menee at 7 o'clock and will be pre- 
ceded by a reception commencing 
at 6:30. Dancing will follow the 
dinner from 10:30 to 1 o'clock. 

Featuring the program will be 
the presentation of tho Ritualistic 
Award to the winning team of the 
finals of the State Ritualistic Con- 
test to be held Sunday, February 
4, at Chelsea 



tee's "Alternate Plan" to increase 
secondary school facilities by en- 
larging the present Junior High 
School to house a four-year senior 
high school and remodelling and 
renovating the present High School 
building for use as a two-year ju- 
nior high school. Appropriations 
voted were the same as those pro- 
vided at the November 30 special 
meeting, at which the "Alternate 
Plan" was first accepted. 

The sum of $1,419,400 was ap- 
propriated for enlarging tin- Junior 
High School, with $1,400,000 t o be 
raised by an issue of 20 year bonds 
and Sll), 4<)(i by transfer from the 
Excess and Deficiency Account. 
To renovate and remodel the High 
School the sum of $231,000 was ap- 
propriated, $150,00(1 to be raised 
by an issue of ten year bonds and 
$81,000 by transfei from the Ex 
cess and Deficiency Account. 

Though passed again by over- 
whelming margins, the votes for 
the "Alternate Plan" Monday night 
were not so nearly unanimous as at 
the November MO meeting. The 
vote to enlarge the Junior High 
School was passed, 138 to 27, and 
that to remodel the senior High 
School, by 1 14 - 2.'!. At the Novem- 
ber 30 meeting the Junior High 
vote was 153-5 and the High 
School, 162 - 4. 

One hundred and eighty of the 
232 precinct members of the town 
were present Monday evening, in- 
dicating that 15 did' not vote on 
the junior high enlargement mo- 
tion, and 13 did not vote on the 
motion to remodel the high school. 

Many citizens, not town meeting 
members attended the meeting 
which lasted until 11:30 with sufti- 
cient sharpness in the debate to 
keep interest at a high pitch. 

Moderator Philip P. Wadsworth 
presided, he and Town Clerk Mabel 
W. Stinson being seated on the 
stage under the words, done in gold 
on the top of the curtain for the 
Winton Club Show, "Here We Go 
A gain". 

Mr. Schneider opened the meet- 
ing, speaking for those who had 
petitioned for the special town 
meeting. He explained that at the ; 
last referendum (if) percent of those 
who voted favored the schools and 
the petitioners for the special 
meeting on Monday felt that with 
more complete discussion of the 
plans and the resolving of contro- 
versial points this percentage can 
be materially increased in the 
event anothel referendum is held. 

The petitioners also felt that 
time is definitely a big factor and 
that with the town elections in the 

oiling the school question should 

be settled to preclude any possibil- 
ity of getting the schools mixed up 
in politics. It was also felt, he 
saiii, that there should be a single 
meeting devoted entirely to schools, 
instead of having to consider so 
important a question at the annual 
town meeting with departmental 
budgets and other articles in a long 
and controversial warrant. 
(Continued on Page (5) 



after 

Ml: 

Fred 
Clark 
issj, 

f rom 



Mrs. Edith Clark Newel! of 11 
Manchester load, wife of Charles 
E. Newell, retired president of the 
Massachusetts School of Art and 
former member of the Massachu- 
setts Board of Education as di- 
rectoi of Fine and Industrial Ait 
in the public schools, died Wed- 
nesday, January 31, at the Peter 
Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston 
a three weeks' illness, 
i, Newell was the daughter of 
Eugene, and Ella (Temple) 
She was born March 4, 
in Bangor, Maine, graduated 
Bradford Academy and was 
married in Bangor June 30, 1908. 
She and Mr. Newell came to Win- 
chestei from Springfield in 1925. 

Mrs. Newell was a member of the 
Second Church, in West Newton. 
Formerly she was active in the 
Mission Union of the First Con- 
gregational Church and in the Li- 
terature Group of the Fortnightly 
Woman's Club. 

Besides her husband, she leaves 
two sons. Dr. Edward Temple 
Newell of Burlington. Vt„ and 
Eugene Parker Newell of Winches- 
ter. There are also two grandchil- 
dren. 

Funeral services will be held at 
2 o'clock on Saturday afternoon at 
the Waterman Chapel in Kenniore 
Square, Boston. Dr. Robert Clyde 
Yarbrough of the Second Church 
in West Newton will officiate. The 
ultimate interment will be in the 
family lot in Mt. Hope Cemetery, 
Bangor, Maine. 



BENKI S — I'ANSO 
md 



DENTAL 



White carnations 
dragon- decorated 
Church on Saturday 
for thi' marriage of 



< LINK ON 
W EN I E 



EV ERE 1 I 



COMING EVENTS 



snap- 
st. Mary's 
January 27. 
Miss Virginia 



Would Boo-t Values Vnd Be 
To Neighborhood 



Boon 



Th« 



■Thunder 



Rose Tans... daughter of Mi. and 
Mi-. Charles Tanso of 92 Forest 
-tieet, to Petei Dennis Benkus, son 
of Mr. and Mi s. Peter Benkus of 7'". 
A-hland street, Lynn. Rev, Fi. 
John P. O'Riordan, pastor of the 
church, officiated at the ceremony 
which took place at high noon and 
was followed by a reception at 
Chickland in Saugus. Ferdinand 



L-ntitlcd t! 



as 



>ne 



MRS. MINNIE FRANCES 
BOWLES 



Mrs. Minnie Frances Bowles of 
174 Cross street, widow of William 
A. Bowles and a long time resident 
of Winchester, died Sunday, Jan- 
uary 28, at her home, after a three 
weeks' illness that followed a long 
period of failing health. 

Airs. Bowles was tin- daughter of 
William R., and Sarah (Farrar) 
Emerson. She was born February 
11, 1808, in Clinton, but spent her 
early childhood in Mil ford, N. H., 
coming to Winchester as a girl of 
eleven years. 

Educated in the Winchestei 
schools, Mis. Bowles was also mar- 
ried in this town on Dei-ember 27, 
1904. Her husband died in May 
of 1945. She was a member of 
the Second Congregational Church 
and of both the Ladies' Missionary 
Society of that Church and of the 
Ladies' Bethany Society. She was 
particularly active in 'the church 
work during her younger years. 

Mrs. Bowles leaves a daughter, 
Mis- Hazel R. Bowles, who is a 
graduate nurse at the Choate 
emorial Hospital VVoburn. 

Funeral servic*^ -j»cir held on 
Tuesday afternoon JTT the Bennett 
Chapel with Rev. John William 
Cook, minister of the Second Con 
gregational (lunch, officiating. 
Interment was in Wildwood Ceme- 
tery. 



I »i Nuoi w as soloist. 

Given in marriage by her father, 
Miss Tanso was attended by her 
sistei, Mrs. Victoria Alia of' Win- 
chester, who was niation of honor. 
Miss Victoria R Alia of Winches- 
ter, small niece of the bride, was 
flower girl, 

The bride wore a gown of blush 
satin trimmed with matching tulle 
and fashioned with a cathedral 
train. Her fingertip-length veil of 
blush silk illusion was caught to a 
satin ciown trimmed with seed 
pearls and she carried a prayer 
book with streamers of stephanotis 
and two white orchids. 

The matron of honor w ore a dress 
of heavenly blue chiffon velvet w ith 
a deep round neckline, long sleeves 
and a full skirt. Her blue velvet 
half hat was ti tmmed with pink and 
blue flowers and she carried a cas- 
cade bouquet of pink gardenia- tied 
with matching ribbon. 

The flower girl wore a full 
skirted frock of pink chiffon velvet 
w ith a bertha collar and a crinoline 
underslip. Her headdress was of 
pink ribbon and forget-me-nots, 
and she carried an old fashioned 
bouquet of pink roses. 

Edward Golumbieski of West 
Lynn was best man for Mr. Benkus. 1 mere a\ 
ushers 



Winchester, long 
Town of Homes and noted 
of the finest icsidential section- 
north of Boston, may soon achieve 
the title of being the finest surbur- 
ban medical center outside Boston. 
With the opening of a large new 
dental clinic pn Everett avenue, 
similar to that recently completed 
in Rangely. and with others con- 
templated, our Town will take the 
bad in medical accommodations. 

The Star learns that a fine new 
clinic may be opened on Everett 
avenue. Patterned after the new 
Rangely clinic, one o f the fine 
dwellings on Everett avenue may 
have its first floor extensively re- 
modelled and altered to accom- 
modate multiple operating rooms, 
i rest rooms, nurses' quarters, kit- 
chen and laboratory. Tho lawn will 
be removed and this space black- 
topped for parking, thus insuring 
; patients of car safety and conveni- 
! ence. The second floor of the resi- 
! dence may be made into 
i ments. 

Such a clinic, it is felt, will boost 
real estate valuations and be a 
convenient addition to this section. 
If the scheme is carried out. the 
professional man interested, now 
living in an exclusive residential 
section, may have quarters equal 
to none and it w ill obviate h i s 



Rock" 
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apart* 



Mi.mli 
Ubt 

If (iwn)i, 11 
' Kimball 

m y 5, Mi.ii.lm . ».<>• p m. - Win- 
High St'htHil Auditorium. Pane! di»- 
"A.ioU'Kivncr : which way to Mu- 
lt. t nil parents, sponsored by 
Hifc'h A anuria teg. 

ary «. Tuesday. 2:»fl p, m. - The 
'hurrh Guild of the First Congregra. 
CliiU-ili will meet in the Ladles' 
to hear the Reverend Alice Snow 
the subject When Your Mirror 
Down." 

ry 6, Tuesday. T ::'0 p. m . to II 
- Hndminloii m ,|„- ]{i K i, SrhiH.l 
minium for Wtnehesici adults 
binary 6, Tuesday, K.-09 p. m. 
Regular meeting ..f Winchester Lodge ..r 
Elks. Waterfiel.l Halt 

Fefcruarj ... Tuesday - Wednesday 
Night Club. First Congregational Church 
Country Dance and Sugar-Eat." 

February s. Thursday, T::in p. m - Kee- 
ular meeting ,.f Mystic Valley Lodge. 

"«s c Apartments. l.,,. n U'avitt, Master, 

February \ Thursday. 7 :30 p. m. to II 
i>. m - Badminton in the High School 
gymnasium for Winchester adult*. 

February Friday, 11:00 a. m. - Art 
Stuil> Croup, Wine-heater College Club at 
Fogg Museum, Qui in- y Street. Cambridge. 
Special program, inel ding French draw- 
ing* and wilier colors. Optional tours in 

lift- I lloi.ll. 



1. 



patients making the unwelcome trip Masonic Hull. Thettghth reguL 

Ins Afternoon of Music, by Stipli 



to Boston. 

Along with the Everett avenue 
project, the Star learns that fail 
ing the purchase of a dwelling on 
Wedgemere avenue, a house for a 
Clink may be erected on Wedge- 
enue similar to that recent- 
s were Francis V. ly completed on Church stive! So 
Winchester and Adolph far as the Star can learn the pro- 
prietor of this Wedgemere avenue 
clinic need only take up a Winches- 
ter residence, presumbly in an ex- 
clusive district. 

In addition to these fine new- 
clinics, it is reported that another 
fine medical clinic 
north of Boston, is 
and scheduled for 
Church street. 



New Fnglund Conservatory of 
P.Hriot's Ten. 
February IS, Tuesday 
Inr meeting of Willia 



m. • 
nieet- 
llts of 
Musie. 



:0fl p. m. 
Park man 



- U 

I ..' ! 



ge. 



Apn rt ments 



ami the 
Alia of 

Alia, Jr.. of West Medford. 

After a wetlding trip to Quebec 
Mr. and Mrs. Benkus will live tern- 
porai ily in Maiden. 

The bride is a graduate of .Med- 
ford Higli School. Mr. Benkus. who 
is an electrical engineer with the 
Hytron Corporation in Salem, grad- 
uated from Lynn Classical High 
School and from Northeastern Uni- 
versity. 



, the fine-t 
contemplated 
erection on 



Dinner <; p. 
John D. Me bear 

February 14. 
Id iTiilnr mealing 

C uh. Masonic Apartments. Principle .speak- 
ii. Hon. Richard I. Furbush,, President rif 
Massac husetts Senate. 

February 1 1. Wednesday, 
Fv* ning Discussion group . 
"f Women Voters at home 
..dm Nichols 
Th.- It. ,V. and 

February 1.", 
I . i. nds of the 
log at Mus 

vited, Spenkei . Mrs. Abraham R. Pinnnskl. 

ch in Sati rdny. 8 : :t0 p. m. - Bow- 
College Med i. bempsters. Metcnlf 
Unitarian Church. Unitarian Couples* 



<». Masonic 
n. Master. 
Wednesday, gjsKt p, m - 
of the Women'- Republican 



8 wl p m. - 
f the League 
of Mrs Mnl- 

:t'.tA Wildw 1 St. Subject: 

Aggression. 

Thursday. 2i30 p. m. . 
Winchester Hospital Meat- 
Hall. All are cordially in- 



Mi 
• loin 
Hall 
Club 



L IT HER S*, MMES AY EH 



Luther Symmes Ayer of 003 
Park avenue, Plainfield, X. J., a 
native of Winchester and grand- 
son of one of Winchester's old time 
town clerks died Friday, Januarv 
2f>, at Jefferson Hospital in Phila- 

it j "«rZ delphia He was 74 years old. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Widen of Mr. Ayer was born October 17 
W illiamstown. formerly of Win- 187(5, in Winchester, son of Albert 
Chester, announce the engagement Eugene, and Addle M. (Whitnevi 
Finalists are the «nd approaching marriage of their Ayer. His grandfather, Albeit 



ENGAGEMENT OF 
WINCHESTER INTEREST 



winning teams of the District Con- daughter. Pauline, to Mr. Frank 

tests, Wakefield, Northeast; Attle- B. Preston. Jr., son of Mr. Frank 

boro, Southeast; Fitchburg, West; B. Preston of Havana. Cuba, and 

Newton, Central and Wintrop. Greenfield Farm, Amsterdam, Va 

Metropolitan. and the late Mrs. Preston. 

Governor Dever, Mayor Rynes of Miss Widen, whose Winchester 

Boston and many prominent figures home was at 15 Chisholm road, was 

graduated from Dana Hall and 



in Elks circles will be in the re- 
ceiving line and delegations will be 
present from the til Lodges in the 
state. Already the advance sale of 
tickets indicates a sellout for the 
affair. 



MISS LAVERTY ENGAGED 



ing bit of singing ami dancing done 
by a group of lively young people. 
The singing of "School For Love" 
was well sung, and their dancing 
was as gay and last as you would 
want to see. The girls were dress- 
ed in sweater- and skirts and tin 
boys it: their sports clothes. They 
did a -well job! 

And speaking . f doing swell 
jobs. Rosalind Lynch did just that 
in her number, "Square in a Social 
Circle" The minute the audience 
saw that one leg swinging just out- 
of the curtain, before they 
what was behind it. they knew 
something good was coming, 
rendition of the song, was a- 
Koz could do it. That was 
proven when tin- audience called 
her back for an encore. 

The ever popular waltz was back 
again, and it proved to be as much 
of a hit as ever. Jackie Mancib, 
and James doKeverc did a bang-up 
job as soloists and the dancers and 
the chorus turned out a neat bit of 
work. 

i Continued on Page '2 i 



side 
saw 
t hat 
Her 
only 



( apt. and Mrs. Robert Laverty of 
15 Orient street, announce the'en- 
gagement of their daughter. Joan 
Mildred, to Richard John Gould, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Gould of 
17 Fastern avenue. Wakefield. 

Miss Laverty graduated from 
Winchester High School in the class 
of 1948 and is employed by the 
State Street Trust Company at 
then Copley Square office. 

Mi Gould is a veteran of World 
W'ai II, having served in the 
Marine Corps for two and a half 
years and is presently employed by 
the General Electric Company in 
Everett, 



ress is 



AUXILIARY FIRE ( ALL 

Fire Chief James F. Callahan 
has announced that three rounds of 
Box ii sounded from the Central 
Station is the signal for the town's 
Auxiliary Fire Force to report for 
duty. Unless this box is sounded 
the "Auxies" can assume that their 
services are not needed. 



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3 Church Street 



Briarcliff Junior College. Mr. Pres- 
ton attended Ruston Academy in 
Havana and graduated from' the 
Episcopal High School in Alex- 
andria. Va. He is now a senior at 
Vale University and a member of 
the Chi Phi fraternity. During 
World War II he served in the 
United States Maritime Service 
with the rank of ensign. 

LENTEN VESPER SERVICE 

A Lenten Vesper Conceit will be 
given b y the Orchestra and the 
Polyphonic Choir of the First Con- 
gregational Church on Sunday, 
March In. Mr. Herbert ('lenient 
will conduct the orchestra in short 
works by many composers, includ- 
ing Mozart, Handel. Haydn, and 
Vivaldi. The Concert Mistn 
Mrs. Iio bert A. Drake. 

The program will be given in the 
main auditorium of the Church 
at 4:30 in the afternoon. Mr. J. Al- 
bert Wilson will be the Organist 
and ( hoii Master. 

MISS WOODWARD ENGAGED 

Mr. and Mis. Donald Woodward 
announce the engagement of their 
daughter, Nancy, to Mr. Richard 
B. Cannon, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
WiUard S. Cannon of Belmont. 

.Miss Woodward graduated from 
Winchester High School in the 
class of ll'4*. and attended Whea- 
ton College. Mr Cannon attended 
the University of Massachusetts 
after his graduation from Belmont 
High School. During World War 
II he served overseas with the 
Army Air Forces. 



Ayer, was town clerk of the town. 
He was educated in the Winchester 
schools and lived in the Ayer 
homestead on Sanborn street. 

Mr. Ayer had lived in Plainfield 
-ince 1912. He was president of 
the Mid-City Trust Company in 
Plainfield and for more than 30 
years was plant and research 
manager of the International Plain- 
field Motor Company, retiring in 
1941. He was a member of the 
Plainfield City Council in 1925 - L'ti 
and was a director of the Union 
Building and Loan Association and 
former vice president of the New 
York and New Jersey Branch of 
the National Metal Trades Associa- 
tion. During World War II he 
served as chairman of Selective 
Service Board 13. 

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. 
Helen Davis Ayer, three sons, two 
daughters and three sisters. 



ROUNDS ON RUSSIAN JOB 



A former Winchester boy, Frank 
W. Rounds, Jr.. 35, son of' Dr. and 
Mrs. Frank W. Bounds of Norwell, 
formerly of Central street, left the 
latter part of December for Russia 
to become attache to the American 
Embassy in Moscow. 

A native of Louisville, Ky.. Mr. 
Rounds graduated from Andover, 
and Princeton, in the class of 1938. 
He became Washington correspond- 
ent for David Lawrence on the 
U. S. News after college and dur- 
ing World W'ai II served as a Navy 
public relations officer in the 
South Pacific with the rank of 
lieutenant commander. He ended his 
Naval duty in 1945 at the Potsdam 
conference as Admiral Gormley's 
aide. 

Leaving the Navy, Mr. Rounds 
served in China as foreign cor- 
respondent foi David Lawrence on 
the U. S. News and World Report. 
After 18 months he returned to this 
country and entered the Harvard 
Graduate School, studying under 
the regional program on the Soviet 
Union. Under the supervision of 
the State Department he studied 
the Soviet language, social and 
political structure and the Russian 
law system. 

Mr. Rounds entered the Stat.- De- 
partment last fall on the Fastern 
European desk. He was appointed 
to the Russian embassy by Presi- 
dent Truman. 



MRS. LOUIE M. MIGHT 



TOWN CANDIDATES LIST 



Assessor 
C e m e t < 
years I - Herman 
Kenneth P. Pond 

Collector of 
Heath, Henry P. 

Constables - 
son. Joseph T. 

urenct 



Alfred D. Elliott, 
ry Commissioner (5 
Pike. ( I yea i I 



Taxes - Donald 
AIu nay. 
Gleason W. Ryer- 
( allahan, John T. 
Humphrey, Finest 
Thomas J. MeKee, 
Penta, Podgoro lan- 



>f Health 



1 1 1 1 p 



Chandler W. 

P. Wads- 



uier 
, Eus 



(3 years) - 
tie B. Ro- 
Smith, John Wil- 
< 2 years i - Eugene 

Han is S Rich- 



Horn, 1 
F. Parker, 
Michael A. 
nacci. 

Hoard 
Symmes. 

Moderator - I' 
worth. 

Park Commissi 
George II. Gowdj 
tundi, Farle I 
Nam Smith, J i . 
M. Pollard. 

Planning Board 
a rdson. 

Trustee of Public Library (3 
years) - Marianne C. Keyes, Leon 
F. Sargent. ( _' years) -' John C. 
Willis, Philip B. Livingstone. 

Boaid of Public W'ell'are - Ade- 
laide Homer, Kendall Way. 

School Committee - Howard R. 
Bartlett, Charles K. Jellison, Dar- 
win F. Gardner. 

Selectman - Don S. Greer, Arthui 
J. Hewis, Jr. 

Town Clerk - Mabel 

Tow n Treasure! - E. 
lee. 

Commissioner of Trust Fund- - 
Francis E. Smith. 

Water and Sewer Board Fr- 
skine X. White. 



W. Stinson. 
Abbot Brad- 



MRS. 



MISS JACKSON, MR. WHITE 
ENGAGED 



Dr. and Mrs. 
Jackson of .Ml' 
Searsport, Maine, 
gagement .> f 



Arthur Morison 
Main street and 
announce the en- 
their daughter. 



uiale 
Bailey 
Robie 



Mai tha Ann, to Mr. Conrad ( 
White, son of Mrs. Philip R 
of Rockland, Maine, and Mr. 
White of Augusta, Maine. 

Miss Jackson is a graduate of 
Colby College in Waterville, Maine, 
and has studied at Boston Univer- 
sity School of Music. She is now 
supervisor of music in the Maine 
towns of Canton, Liverniore, and 
Sumner. 

Mr. White is a giaduate of Colby 
College and is now on the staff of 
radio station W. X. B. H. at New- 
Bedford, Massachusetts. He is a 
member of the United States Naval 
Reserve and is a veteran of World 
War II. 

The wedding is planned for the 
near future. 



Mrs. Louie M. Hight of 19 Cabot 
street, widow of Francis W. Hight, 
died late Wednesday afternoon, 
January 31, at her home after a 
brief illness. 

Daughter of Edward, and Ellen 
(Jack) Small, Mrs. Hight was born 
in Portland, Me., July l',». 1871. 
She was married in Portland in 
1895, she and her husband coming 
to Winchester from Wollaston in 
1905. She had made her home at 
her Cabot street address since that 
time. 

Mrs. Hight was a member •.)' the 
Fortnightly Woman's Club, of the 
Unitarian Church and of the old 
Ladies' Friendly Society of that 
church, now the Women's Alliance. 

Surviving ate two -',,n.-. Robert 
E., and Philip S. Hight, both of 
Winchester; and two granddaugh- 
ters, Susan and Ellen Hight. 

Funeral services will be held at 
2 o'clock on Saturday afternoon at 
the Bennett Chapel with the Rev. 
Robert A. Storer, minister of the 
Unitarian Church, officiating. Ul- 
timate interment will be in Ever- 
green Cemetery, Portland, Me. 

MISS BEL( HER RESIGNS 



ANNIE WEAVER 
WALKER 



her, 
ami 
• of 



Mr-. Annie ( Weaver i Wa 
widow of Benjamin W. Walkci 
mother of Charles A. Walke 
Symmes road, dud Wednesday 
morning, January 31, in Stoneham 
ii her 96th year. 

Born in England. Mrs. Walker 
lived for many years in Chelsea. 
Later she was a resident of Newton 

fore going to Stoneham. Besides 
her -on in Winchester -he leave- a 
son, Walter H. Walker of Ridge- 
wood, X. J. 

Funeral services w ill be held this 
Friday afternoon at 
the Bennett Chapel. 
Lee Bailey, pastor of 
h, will of 
ie private. 



REFERENDUM PAPERS OUT 

Papers for a referendum on the 
successful school vote of Monday 
evening's special town meeting 
were taken out Tuesday afternoon 
by a representative of the Refer- 
endum Committee, members of 
which have opposed the School 
Building Committee's plan to en- 
large the Junior High School to 
house a four-year senior high 
school and renovate ami remodel 
th, senior high school to become a 
junior high. sch- ->i 

Referendum papers must be in 
the hands of the Board of Select- 
men not later than Saturday after- 
noon at 5 o'clock, the statute stat- 
ing that such papers must be tiled 
not later than live days following 
the vote, exclusive of Sunday- and 
holidays. 

This will mark the second time 
this particular school building pro- 
gram has been subjected to a refer- 
endum. First passed at a special 
town meeting November 30, the 
plan, called the "Alternate Plan", 
was subsequently beaten by a very 
narrow margin of 57 votes on a 
referendum. The same plans were 
passed again by hist Monday's 
special session, by a large majority, 
though not quite so large as that 
of the November 3d meeting. 

ENGAGED 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter K. Maroney 
of 5 Myopia Hill road announce 
the engagement of their daughter 
Charlou Maroney to E n s i g n 
Howard Austin Shartel, U. S. N. 
«m of Mr. Stratton Shartel and 
the late Mrs. Flizaheth Austin 
Shartel of Kansas City, Missouri. 
Miss Maroney is a sophomore at 
Salve Regina College in Newport 
R. I. Ensign Shartel attended 
Vale University and is a graduate 
of the United States Naval Acad- 
emy, Annapolis, Maryland, Class 
of 1950. 



ENGAGEMENT 



Baile 
ti-t Chin 
inent will 



Kev. 

the Fi 



nek at 
Walte, 

nt R. 



iate. Inn 



sap- 



Mrs, George A 
Rustic road Stom 
'he engagement i 
N'ancv. to Allan 

Mrs. Carrie L C 



i IH- 



if 1-' 



. I aril 

lam, announce 
of her uaughtei 
W. Chief, on ., 
Hch of 151 Wash 



gton 
M i - s 



UNION LENTEN SERVH ES 
Wednesday F\enings at 7:15 



-fleet. Winch 
Jaidine is a 
Stoneham High Schoi 
a student at Burdett 



NURSES AIDES NEEDED 

I he W im he-tor Ret! On-- Chapter i- making an urgent 
appeal for Xuraes' Aide- thi. month. Not only are new 
applicant- needed* I'm training, hut also there i- a special 
need »'..r inactive Udes t». return to -en i.e. More nurses 
are leaving for the Irmed Services, The now Winchester 
Hospital wing will place new demand- on the nursing -tall. 
If you can help, cull W Inchester <i-2imi ,,i 6-1766. 



Miss Eiise A. Belcher has re- 
signed as executive hostess of the 
First Congregational Church after 
22 year-' service. Her resignation 
was prompted by consideration for 
her health. She had filled the of- 
fice since it was created in 1922. 

At the annual meeting of the 
Church on January 24. in apprecia- 
tion of the faithfulness and quality 
of Miss Belcher's service, resolu- 
tions were unanimously adopted, 
which said in part: 

"That the members 
Church do hereby express 
gret on the resignation 
A. Belcher as Executive 



February 7 - Church 
phany — Rev. John 
Preacher 

February 14 . Craw- 
rial Methodist Church - 
W. Cook, Preacher 

February '21 - W:nc 
tarian Church — Rev. 
Bailey. Preacher 

February 2« - First 
tional Church — Rev. 
StOrer, Preacher 

March 7 - First Baptist Church 
— Dr. Howard J. Chidley. Preachei 

March 14 - Second Congregation- 
al Church — Rev. Dwight W. Had- 
ley. Preacher 



of the Epi- 

Snook, Jr.. 

lord Memo- 
— Rev. John 

lester Cm- 
Walter Lee 

Congrega- 
Robert A. 



ster. 

gradual u 
, and is ni 
( ol iege. 

Mr. Ulrich is a graduate of Wi 
chester High School and is set"! 
with the U. S. Navy at the N; 
Am- Station, Miami. Florida. 

No immediate date ha- been 
for the wedding. 



SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

Mr. and Mr-. Theodore W Hait- 
ley of 15 Governor's avenue, wide- 
ly known residents of Winchestei 
foi many years, celebrated their 
(JOth Wedding Anniversary St their 
home on Saturday, January 20. Mr, 
and Mrs. Hartley have three chil- 
dren, five grandchildren and eight 
great-grandchildren, all of whom 
wen. present. 



of this 
their re- 
of Elise 
Hostess 



and their gratitude to her for the 
services that she has rendered dur- 
ing the past 22 years, and they fur- 
ther express the hope that m the 
year ahead sl>e will enjoy health 
and happiness and the knowledge 
that the friendship and apprecia- 
tion of the people of our Church 



SELECTIVE SERVICE 
NOTICE 



Winchester Registrants under Selective Ser\ice are reminded 
that it is their responsibility to keep their Local Selective Service 
Board advised of any change of address or change of personal cir- 
cumstances nhich might affect their classification. Communica- 
tion* should be sent to Local Selective Service Board No. ,f \ Citv 
Hall, Medford, Mass. s29-tf 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2. 1951 




A MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK 

MORTGAGES 

\\| HAVE A PLAN TO SUIT EVERYONE 
WITH OR WITHOUT PRINCIPAL PAYMENTS 
AT REASONABLE INTEREST RATES 

/ P TO 7 H 7 V/ V ) E IRS TO PAY 

G. I. - CONSTRUCTION - DIRECT REDUCTION 



SEE I S IF YOU ARE PLANNING TO 
HI II I) BUY OR REFINANCE 
YOl R PRESENT MORTGAGE 



Telephone WInehester 6-2130 



Winchester Savings Bank 



26 MT.VERNON ST. 



MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 8 A M TO 2 P M 




INCORPORATED 167 




WIN CHESTER, MASS 



NOT OPEN SATURDAYS 



WINTON < U It CABARET 
i ( 'ontinued from Page 1 1 

During the intermission the Pro- 
gram Lucky number was drawn. 
The winner on Thursday night was ' 
a Winton Club member, Mrs. J Ames 
i . MeCormick, of Wedgemere ave- 
nue, on Friday night, Mr. Thornton 
Jesdale of Cabot street was the 
lucky winner, and on Saturday 
night Mrs. Loring Nichols won. 
The S. S. Pierce merchandise credit 
was won by Bill Hood, son of the 
Many P. Mood's of Oxford street. 

After the intermission, the show 
got off to a fast start by a duet 
mng by Barbara do Revere and 
Sherman Russell, followed by the 
,jood "Id "Charleston" in a like- 
wise fast pace. The dancers sure 
did their stuff and practically 
brought the house down. 

Scene two was a nifty tap solo 
done again by Marguerite Derm, 
to the tune of "Carioea". She was 
enthusiastically received and she 
was neatly garbed in a sparkling 
black sequined costume. 

We would like to have the "Roe 
kette«" from New York come and 
take a good look at the Roekettes 
we had on stage Inst week, and see 
if they could do such a swell job in 
such a short time of rehearsals. 
The gals did a wonderful job ami 
their costumes were as snappy and 
trig as any in the show. Our hats 
off to them! 

Shades of Hawaii! The old Town 
Hall has never seen anything quite 
like it. Even the clock in the 
tower must have felt the vibration 
way up there those three nights 0 f 
last week. What vibration'.' Why 
the laughter of the audiences 
WRt 1 ing the Hula number in the 
show. Featuring all men. the 
dancers literally had the spectators 
rocking the rafters with their 
laughter. Maybe Godfrey should 
have been there to see how they 




MOFFETT 
FUNERAL SERVICE 

M G. MOFFETT 

Reg. Funeral Director and 
Km liu liner 

177 Washington StrrfC. Winrhest*r 

Tel. \\ lnche.h r 0-1730 
mal3-tf 



really do the Hula, at least the , 
way those boys did it! It erased : 
troubles and worries from many a 
mind, temporarily at least. 

Cm-rick Kennedy did a grand job 
of singing "You're in the Night", 
followed by a group of twelve girls 
doing a tango. Their costumes of 
red, black and orange certainly 
gave a gay setting to the dance. 

The entire cast joined in the final 
number singing '•Flying High", 
with some acrobatics done by 
Miriam Graham. 

All in all it was a snappy, well 
done show, performed by a group 
of wonder people, of whom all are 
interested in giving their time and 
talents to a worthy cause. 

Following is a complete list of 
committees, cast and program. 

( A BARET COM M 1TTKF.S 

Central C.immittfT 

Mr- Charles Bothfr. Chairman 

Mr. Thomas Alilrich. Jr. 

Mm. Ham H t. Ii 

Mr. Va Khan Harmon 

Mrs Clarence MrDwvitt, -l> 

Mr. Carriek Kennedr, Treasurer 
Cover : 

Mrs. Fulton Brown 
Prom ram : 

(hairmrn 

Mrs R.ibi'rt Thomnson 
Mr. John Willi. 

Co-Chairman 

Mrs T Price Wilson 
Captains: 

Mrs. Curl Raton 
Mis. l-'re ..•ri>- li'.N, Jr. 
Mr. lr\inu Jennings 
Mrs. Harol.l M.v.-i 
Ml. Janus Mmrai 
Solicitors : 

Mrs. Robert AUa.u 
j Mrs. Thomas Aldrich, Jr. 
Mrs Shailer Aver> 
Mrs. Malcolm Bennett 
Mrs. Walter Birnie 
Mrs Charles Butler 
Mrs Fuiton Brown 
Mr Lyndon lturnham 
Mrs. George Collins 
Mrs. Taul Cummins 
Mrs Albert Crockett 
Mrs. Donald Crowell 
Mr.. Richard Cunningham 
Mrs. Frank d'ElseaUK 
Mrs. Bertram Dnhe 
Mrs. Allen F*.aton 
Mrs. Charles Emerson 
Mrs. John Ohlrardlhi 
Mrs Luring treason 
i Mrs Burton Gov* 
Mrs E. Craig tireiner 
Mrs. Kirhard Harlo* 
Mrs Vaughan Harmon 
Mrs. J. Chnndlei Hill 
Mrs. Gilbert HikmI, Jr. 
Mrs. Hairy Houd, Jr. 
Mrs. Melville Hughes. Jr 
Mrs Edward Kuypera 
Mrs. John Lynch 
Mrs. Harvard Mann 
Mrs. George Marks 
Mrs. Kenneth Moffatt 
Mrs. Charles Moore 
Mrs Stanley Neil 
Mrs. Jam,-. Newman 
Mrs IV Stewart New ton 
Mrs. Ellsworth Nichols 
Mrs Loring Nichols 
Mr.. John Page 
Mrs. Hum Parsons 
Mrs. Rowland Patrick 
Mr.. Harris Richardson 
Mrs. K. Marshall Sargent 
Mrs. Robert H Smith 
Mr.. Robert M Smith 
Mr.. Harold gtevens 
Mr... Everett Stone 
Mrs Hen Schneider 
Mr.. Walworth Williams 
l irket. : 

Chairman 

Mrs. Frank d'F.iscauv 

i o-( hairmrn 
Mrs. Melville Hughes 
Mr. Herbert \V« .worth 
I nptain. : 

Mrs. Kobert M Smith 
Mr.. Robert Abbott 



Mrs. Kenneth duly 
Mrs Paul Com ins 
Mr.. Allen Eaton 
Mrs Carl Eaton 
Mr.. U rton tiovc 
Mis Richard Harlow 
Mrs Gilbert Hood, .Ii . 
Mrs Edward Kuypers 
Mrs. Alvin Litchfield 
Mrs Earh' Spencer 
Mis Walworth Wl.liams 
I nstumes : 

( hairmrn 

Mr.. Albert Crockett 
Mis Harold Stevens 

Mrs. Th lore Chilcott 

Mrs. Vincent Farnsworth, Jr 

Mrs. Arthur Jackson 

Mrs. Irving Jennings 

Mrs Harvard Mann 

Mrs. George Marks 

Mrs. Geoffrey Noilley 

Mrs. Rowland Patrick 

Mrs. Thomas Kighter, Jr 

Mrs W. Campbell Ross 

Mrs Earle Spencer 

Mrs. Chand er Symmes 

Mrs. Wayne Thompson 
t nances : 

Co-Chairmen 

Mrs. Robert Srntt 
Mrs. Everett Stone 
ruhlicitv : 

( o-< hairmrn 

Malcolm Bennett 
Bertram Dube 



Mrs 
Mrs. 
Music : 



( o-Chairmen 

John Ghirardini 
Irving Jennings 



Mrs 

Mrs. 
Sound : 

Mr. John Blanchard 
Prnpcrties: 

("hairmrn 

I Mrs. Edward Kuypers 
Mrs. Richard Harlow 

Mr.. Kenneth Cady 
Mrs. Rirhar I Cunningham 
Mrs. Robert H. Smith 
Make-up: 

Chairman 

Mr. Ha7.cn Aver 

Mrs. Francis Booth 
Mrs. Theodore Chilcott 
Mrs. Maurice Freeman 
Mrs. Herman Pike 
Stage and Lighting: 

Chairman 
Mr. Charles Butler 

Mr. Joseph Butler 
Mr. Bertram Dube 
Mr. Franklin Flanders 
Mr. E. Marshall Sargent 
Kobert Scott 
John Sexton 
Harold Stevens 
Everett Stone 



Mi- 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr 
Fluor 



Mrs Fredric 



Chairman 

Ives, Jr. 



Mrs. Robert Abbott 
Mrs. Walter Birnie 
Mrs. Richard Cunningham 
Mrs Theodore Chilcott 
Mrs. James Dwinell, Jr. 
Mrs. Vincent Farnsworth, Jr. 
Mrs. Maurice Freeman 
Mrs. Burton Gove 
Mrs. Alvin Litchfield 
Mrs. Ellsworth Nichols 
Mrs. Charles Moore 
Mrs. John Page 
Mrs. Everett Stone 
I she rs : 

Friday Sight — Head 1 sher 

John Willis 



Mr 
Fluor 

Mr 
Mr 
Mr 
Mr 
Mr 




Kimball 



FUNERAL SERVICE 

39 Church Street 
Winchester 



Winchester 6-0200 





FUNERAL SERVICE 

418 ^ASS AVE. ARLINGTON 
Cel. ARunctos 5-1034 




Juhu W. Lane, Jr. 
— Director — 

760 Main Street. Winchester 
Winchester 6-2580 



Walter Birnie 
Albert Crockett 
Janus Dw'incll. Jr 
Herbert Wadsworlh 
Erskine White 
Hah on - : 

Botildin Burba nk, Jr 
Robert Burnham 
Donald McDavitt 
F. M Ives III 

Saturday Night — Brad I shrr 
Mr J. Warren Shoemaker 
Floor : 

Mr Richard Cunningham 
Mr. l.vn .on Burnham 
Mi Kenneth Moffatt 
Mr. Charles Moore 
Mr Robert II. Smith 
Balronv : 
John Borden 
W Prescott Keyes 
Jost Michelsen 
John Mills 
Itcroration- ; 

( hairman 

Sam el Kekwoo.1 
Robert Abbott 
Lymlon Burniiam 
Kenneth Cady 
Fredei ic C raven 
Arthur .lark. on 
William Mitchell 
Ellsworth Nichols 
Hern. a n Pike 
W Campbell ltos- 
Robert H Smith 
Robert M Smith 
Refreshments : 

< hairmrn 

an : Mrs J ( handler Hill 
Thomas Aldrich, Jr 
Shilller Avcrv 
William i oa.lv 
J. Kenneth Colony 
Paul fomitis 
H Harmon Hall 
Harry Hood, Jr 
Carriek Kennedy 
John Maynar.l 
George Rivtnius 
David Sheuii 
Robert Wild 
Walworth Williams 

Refreshments For Last: 

Chairman 

Mrs James Dwinell. Jr. 

Mrs Walter Birnie 
Mrs Vincent Farnsworth, Jr 
Mr- Ellsworth Nichols 
Flow ers : 

I hairman 

Mrs Stanley Neill 

Co-Chairmsn 
Mrs Charles Moore 
Flower GirU: 

Friday Night 

Carol Ambru*r 
Carolyn Crockett 
Janet Easton 
Paula Lanigan 
Janet Macaulay 
Sue Morton 
Margaret Smith 



M- 
M 

Mr. 

M. 

M 

Mr 

Mr 

Mr 

Mr 
M : 
M r 
Mi 
Mi 
M 



IT'S YOUR LIFE 

You Risk When You Drive An Unsafe Car! 

And You May Be Responsible For The In- 
jury Or Death Of Another 

Let Us ( heck The Vital Parts Of Your Car 



FRONT END 

STEERING KNUCKLES 



BRAKES 



Our BEAR ALIGNMENT Experts Will 
l ake The Gamble Out Of Your 
Driving! 

SEE US SOON! 

Moody Motor Sales 

Inc. 

632 Main St. Winchester, Mass. 

TEL. Winchester 6-3133 



RENTON'S 

Church Street Opposite Winchester Irn-t Co. 

For 

STEAK - ROASTS - CHOPS 
HEAVY STEER BEEF - TENDER SPRING LAMB 



Saturday Night 

Jane Chi. well 
Mary Ann Damon 
Jean Farnubiir 
Phoebe Greenwood 
Felicia MeMHenppa 
Jean Neiley 
Sue Ordway 
June Ryan 
Maltha Whiting 
Cigarettes: 

( hairman 

Mi*. John Page 

Co-i hairman 
Mrs Burton lime 
Cigarette I. iris: 

Friday Night 
Judy Harmon 
Midge Dexter 
inanne tireei 

Carolyn Buracker 

Saturday Night 

Sally liirnie 
V irginiu Dyer 
t arol HawkitH 
Shir.ey Cary 

Program 
Here We Co Again" 

Act I 

Scene I: Around The Town" 

t hoi u- is selected from the dancers in 
the cast , 

W inton Club Drill 
Rebecca Avery 
Evelyn Aldrich 
Katherine Comins 
Matilda Cunningham 
Marjorte Eaton 
Katherine Hood 
Priscilla Kennedy 
Alice Moore 
Marjorie Scott 
Anna Stone^^ 
Deborah wi^P" 
Miuv Lou Wnifams 
Scene II: "I Need A .Man Around — 

Dorothy Ghirardini 
Scene III: Summer Showers' 
Duet: 

LUelH Ann Wright 
Charles l.ovejov 
Tap Solo: 

Marguerite Derio 



- POULTRY - 

BROILERS - FRYERS - ROASKRS 

Fresh Native 

We are now carrying a complete line of Seller's Product* 
FRESH FRUIT and VEGETABLES 

- FREE DELIVERY - 

WI 6-2332 WI 64)534 



Merlon Oher 

Craig (Ireiner. Jr. 

Kinmotis Klli> 
Srene II: Tap Solo K'ariocs) — 

Marguerite Demi 
Scene III: Rockettes 

Jean Mctirath 

Elizabeth Murray 

Lucia Ann Wright 

Barbara Htirbank 

Joan Zimmerman 

Ellen Kenorson 

Miriam Graham 

Gayle Sawyer 

Barbara Elliott 

Nancy Mulcahy 

Virginia Carey 

Cera Mine Badger 
Scene IV : Hula 

John Mi'Kee 

Bill Abbott 

Donald Badger 

Neal Clark 

Ren Aldrich 

Clifford Lindberg 

Arthur Tutcin 

Arthur Coninlli 
Scene V: "You're In The Night (Tango) — 

Carriek Kennedy 
Solo Dancers: 

Owen Ballon 

Frank Pynn 

Geraldine Badger 
Timmy Owen 
Gloria (Justin 
Priscilla Kennedy 
Runny Butler 
Charlotte Ober 
Mildred Rivlnius 
Evelyn Aldrich 
Barbara Fontneau 
Mary Lou Williami 
Pat Evans 
Scene VI: "Flying High" 

The entire cast featnrinir Miriam Graham 



Judy Snell 



Joseph Butler 
Emmons Ellis 
Bill Croston 
June Larson 
Joan Zimmerman 
Nancy Griffin 
Janet Pride 
Runny llardnei 
Jane Larson 
Ed McDevitt 
Frank Pynn 
John HcKee 
Mildred Kivinius 
Barbara Burbank 
Timmy Owen 
Jeanne Wilde 
Doris Zimmerman 

Maxime Kajander 
Scene IV: "Happy As A Lark" 
Sam Tompkins 

Bill Croston 
Jim Farnsworth 
Scene V: W inton Club ( an I an 

Marjorie Scott 

E.len Hill 

Dorothy Ghirardini 

Anna Stone 

Evelyn Aldrich 

Priscilla Kennedy 
Scene VI: "School For Love" 

Jean McGrath 

Janet Pride 

Jackie Mnnrih 

Mai y Jim Abbott 

Betty Pritchard 

Koaalie Holme* 

Janet Car) 

N.al Clark 

Ed McDevitt 

l raig < ireinci . .1 r 

Bill Abbott 

Bill Cunningham 

Sum Tompkins 

Jim Farnsworth 
Scene Ml: "Square In A Social Circle" — 

Kor.alin.1 Lynch 
Scene VIII: "The First sign of Spring" 

i Waltn 
Duet: 

Jackie Mancih 
James .Ic Kevere 
I horus : 

Joan Zimmerman 
Joan Thomas 
John Sexton 
Charles Lovejoy, Jr 
I'lirtiara Elliott 
Betty Murray 
Craig (ireinet J r 
Sam Tompkins 
Dancers : 

Bunny Butler 
JoAnne Robinson 
Charlotte Obei 
Gwen Ballon 
Jeanne Wtlde 
Timmy Owen 
Jeanne Hanington 
Maxime Kajahder 

Barliara Fontneau 
Betty Ann Pritchard 
Carolyn. Knglan l 
Janet Pri is 
Mertun Ober 
Wesley Swanson 

Joseph Butler 
Frank Pvnn 
Rill Croston 
Jim Farnsworth 
Arthur Tutein 
Bill Cunningham 
Neal Clark 
Clifford Lindberg 
William Gustin 
Ed McDevitt 

Intermission 
Act II 

>cene I: "When Voa and I Grew I p' 

' Charleston i 
Duet : 

Barbara d>' Revere 
Sherman Russell 

Lucia Ann Wright 
Shirley Puffer 
Nancy Mu cahey 
Nancy Westward 
R'walie Hulmt^i 
Doris Zimmerman 
Barbara Burbank 
Ma garet Sexton 
Edna Wild 
Gloria Gustin 
Janet Msynsri 
JoAnne Robinson 
Neal t'lark 
Sam Tompkins 
Bill Cunningham 
Clifford Lindberg 
Ben Aldrich 
Charles Lovejoy. Jr. 
Jim Farnsworth 
John Sexton 



LIBKAHY ACTIVITIES 

Musk \l The l ibrary 

Reeorded music program for 
Wednesday, February 7 at :'. p. in. 
and again at 7::i0 p, ni.; 

Symphony No. :! "Scotch" (Third 
and Fourth movements) - Mendels- 
sohn 

Mathis Der Maler i First and Sec- 
ond movements i - Hindemith 

Music from Children's Corner 
Suite - Debussy 

Concerto in A for Clarinet (P'irst 
I movement) - Mozart 

Selections from Naughty Mari- 
!etta - Herbert 



THE FINEST IN 

TELEVISION 

FROM $189.50 UP. 

Philco Refrigerators AT NEW 
LOW PRICES 

RADIO AND TELEVISION SERVICE 
AT REASONABLE PRICES 

PARK RADIO CO. 

618 MAIN STREET Winchester 6-2280 

Serving Winchester for Over 17 Years 



Cummings the Florist 



18 Thompson Street 



Tel. WI 6-1077 



^ FLOWERS 



A Full Line of Cut Flowers and Plants 




Educational Films At The Library: j 

Program for Friday, February 2 
at 7:30 and Saturday, February 3 
at 10:15: 

Paper 

Painting with Sand 
The Big Kitchen 
Cartoon 



Winchester 
Cleaning Service 



MIKE PENT A, Proprietor 



Winchester (vO'lo-J 



Homes — 



- Stores 



WE CLEAN 

Windows, walls, floors. Venetian blinds, rugs, cellars, and at- 
tics. Windows repaired, glass set; screen and storm window 
service. Gardens, lawns, etc.. cared for. Rubbish removal. 
Floors shellaced and waxed. 



Program for Friday, February 9 
at 7:30 and Saturday, February 10 
at 10:15: 

Snapping Turtle 

Egypt, Land of Pyramids 

The Zoo 

Are you a good citizen? 



What W mchesler Is Reading 

Balance Wheel - Taylor Caldwell 
Behind the Flying Saucers - 

Frank Scully 

Belles on Their Toes - Frank Gil- 

breth 

Disenchanted - Budd Schulberg 

Eleanor of Aquitaine and the 
"our Kmgs - Amy Kelly 

Foxfire - Anya Seton 

Henry Gross and His Dowsing 
Rod - Kenneth Roberts 

High Green and the Bark Peel- 
ers - Robert Neal 

Joy Street - Francis Parkinson 
Keyes 

Kon Tiki - Thor Heyerdahl 
Lady's Not for Burning - Chris- 
topher Fry 

Life's Picture History of World 
War II 

My Neck of the Woods - Louise 

Dickinson Rich 

Ninth Earl - Jeffery Farnol 
Nuts in May - Cornelia Otis 

Skinner 

Out of This World - Lowell 
Thomas. Jr. 

River of the Sun - James Ramsey 
Ullman 

Son of a Hundred Kings - Thomas 

B, Costain 

Library Hours 

Adult Departments 10 a. m. to 9 
p, m. Saturdays lu a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Hoys' and Girls' Library 10 a. m. 
to 12 noon. 1 to t> p. m. 

Tel. Winchester fi-U06 



ELECTRIC WATER PI MP AT YOUR SERVICE 

FRANK REEG0 

- CONTRACTOR - 

Landscape Gardener and General Trucking. Asphalt Drive- 
ways, Roads. Equipped with 3-ton roller. Owned and Operated. 
GRADING — DRIVEWAYS — DRY WELLS 
LOAM, SAND. GRAVEL, CRUSHED STONE FOR SALE 

All Men Insured 

Tel. Winchester 6-2412 or Winchester 6-0098- W 

rrml».tf 



METHODIST COUPLES' CLUB 
PARTY 



The Married Couples' Club of the 
Crawford Memorial Methodist 
Church is having its Valentine 
Party this coming Tuesday at 6:30 
p. m. Rev. Harry P. Folger, popu- 
lar speaker and well known in 
Methodist circles, will speak to the 
group. All married couples are 
cordially invited. For information 
concerning the supper, please call 
Mrs. Ralph Pingree. Winchester 6- 




PROSPECTIVE 
RUG BUYERS 

\\ e invite you to our -how room* to <ee one of the mo-t 
complete stock* of choice Oriental Ru^n in New England. 

Never before have w»- been able to oiler such a wide; -.elec- 
tion of Scatter, Room -ize ami Oversize rugs in all color*, and 
qualities. ( »ur experience in buying and selling rug., for the; 
past ,18 year-, i- your guarantee of satisfaction. 

^J^oLo i^ooclaLian & ~Sond 
14 LOCHWAN STREET, WINCHESTER, MASS, 
Winchester 6-2213 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2. 1951 



3 



ST. MARY'S TOOK CLOSE 
ONE 2*-27 

St. Mary's basketball team, in 
their second encounter of the sea- 
son, took one from St. Joseph's of 
Wakefield by the narrow margin of 
one point in their game played at 
Wakefield last week. 

St. Mary's went ahead in the 
early seconds of play, but not for 
long, a* the scoring was a nip and 
tuck contest during the entire 
halftime was 16- 
having the edge. 
In the third period St. Mary's came 
back into the fight on two baskets 
and a foul *hot by Farrell, and a 
foul ^hot by Ledger, tying the 
score at 20 all. During the third 
period St. Joe's poured it on to lead 



by four points at the end of the 
quarter. With St. Joe's having a 
one point lead in the closing 
minutes of the game. Quill stepped 
in with the winning basket to wrap 
up the game for St. Mary's 2* - 27. 
The summary: 

St. Mar>s 



LEXINGTON SNAPPED 
INDIANS' STREAK 



game. Score ai 
lo, St. Joseph's 



Carrier 
yuill 
Mi, a i 
Ki.rr.il 
Mi M:m s 
Keating 
IMgi r 



Totals 



j Kirnigan 



St. Jo«*ph> 







TUXEDOS 






FOR HIRE 






For All 






1 Occasions 


PHILIP CHITEL 
MEN'S SHOP 

596 Main Street 



Callahan 

O'Brien 



0 
14 



\V|N< HESTER BOYS A I 
SHEPARD FIELD 



Foui Winchester boys, Frank 
.Johnson, Milton Galucia, Robert 
(lagan :^nd Kenneth V. Donaghey. 
who left town January '■' to report 
to the Ail Force base at Lackland 
Field in Texas, have completed 
their training there. They have 
now been assigned to Shepard Field 
in Texas for six weeks of basic 
training. All four enlisted in the 
Air Forces during December. 



■ m ■ » 

i WH 



WHAT TYPE PICTURES DO YOU LIKE? 



Prints - Florals - Religious - Copies 
s Children's Pictures. 



Marines Sporting 
of Modern and Old Masti 

Come in and inspect our selection of unframed prints. 

Expert Picture Framing 

Malcolm G. Stevens 

78 Summer Street ARlington 5-4112 

(Cor. Mill Street — Near Arlington Center) 



LOCAL SERVICE 



r 
0 

o 
> 
r 

w 
m 

3 

o 
m 



8 

> 
r 

m 

? 

o 
m 



TELEVISION 

INSTALLATION 
SERVICE 
SALES 

LOCAL SERVICE IS BETTER 

WINCHESTER APPLIANCE CO. 



LOCAL SERVICE 
U 

u 

— 

> 

a: 

UJ 

w 

J 
< 

u 
0 
J 



The Winchester victory streak 
was ended at eleven straight as 
Lexington High defeated the Red 
and Black by a score of 56 - 4*5 at 
Lexington last Friday night. It was 
a tension-filled battle as the teams 
matched basket for basket right 
down until the final quarter when 
Lexington spurted to a seven point 
lead early in that period which 
clinched the contest. Through the 
middle two periods the teams weie 
never mote than four points apart 
as a succession of spectacular plays 
evoked constant screaming from a 
highly partisan capacity throng. 

Winchester could just as easily 
have spurted to that lead early in 
the final period but Dame Fortune 
refused to smile on the locals and 
gave her nod to Lexington. Win- 
chester took shots at the basket 
in the final period, all good ones, 
but only two dropped in as the ball 
rolled off the rim heart breaking 
time after heart -breaking time. 
This was the first time this year 
that the locals have been outscored 
in the final period but it was not 
from lack of effort but simply sus- 
tained luck in that period. 

The lied and Black played too 
cautiously in the first period and 
did not get its attack rolling as 
they trailed lo at the end of 
that period, Winchester played its 
best ball of the game in the second 
quarter as they scored 'JO points to 
take a narrow' 26 - 24 lead at the 
half time. The third period was 
packed with action, with both teams 
playing brilliant ball, as they ex- 
changed basket for basket with 
the locals leading 40 - 39 at the end 
of that rapid-fire session. As re- 
lated above the Minutemen broke 
away to a quick seven point lead 
in the final period and that did it 
as the locals just could not put the 
ball through the hoop. 

John Dilorio and Charles Murphy 
were the outstanding performers 
in the Winchester defeat. Dilorio 
was the top local scorer with 12 
points and was the only Winches- 
ter player to rebound well offen- 
sively and defensively. For the sec- 
ond time this year Murphy effec- 
tively stopped McDonnell, the top 
Lexington scorer, and accomplished 
that feat without even committing 
a foul on the speedy Lexington ace. 
Inability to throttle Lee was a big 
factor in the Winchester defeat as 
that worthy scored 20 points, 14 of 



which came in the second half. Be- 
cause of that hard luck fourth peri- 
od the Winchester shooting per- 
centage dropped to 25 per cent for 
this contest which again em- 
phasizes the fact that the locals 
could easily have won if they had 
maintained their customary good 
shooting percentage over that final 
period. 

Although hard pressed all the 
way, the Winchester Seconds pulled 
out a 42 - 86 victory for their 
eleventh straight victory of the sea- 
son. Norman Howard was out- 
standing for the Bed and Black as 
his aggressive play netted him 12 
points while Joe Donlon showed 
continued improvement in scoring 
•» points and playing a superb 
game. 

The summary: 

Lexington High 



VICTORY TRAIL AGAIN! 







B 


f 


!>W. 


I If 




: }1 : ' 




in 


MrDonni 


11. rf 


A 


0 


ii 


■ Cunning 


mm. c 




i 


: ! 


i Si evens. 






0 


0 


' Snellen. 


% 








Mct.nuitl 




1 


1 


it 


P»eknr<i; 


re 


ii 


0 


! 


• Vslihum 




0 


IJ 




j Totals 




■>6 


t 


56 




W inrhfster 


IliEh " 










« 


f 


pts. 


' Dilorio. 


If 




6 


12 


Symtnis, 


rf 


■i 




I 


. Parrel), 


rf 


0 


■ i 




I...n K . c 




; 


4 


10 


Hnwkins 


. Ic 


:! 


0 


ti 


< Murphy, 


rjt 


t 


1 




TnUls 




: 5 


Hi 


t« 



Referees, Ferguson and Gaffney 



FRFSHMEN MAKE 16 
SIX STRAIGHT 



The Winchester Freshmen added 
their sixth straight victory of the 
season by defeating the Wakefield 
Freshmen by a score of 57 - 40 at 
the high school gym last Friday 
afternoon. The locals were able to 
maintain a comfortable lead all the 

; way, thinks to the high scoring ef- 
forts of Dave Pratt, Al l.indsey. 
and "Moose" Bellino. The Win- 
chester Junior High made it a 
clean sweep for the day by a Ml - 9 

i victory over the Wakefield Junior 
High. 
The summary: 

Winrhesler Freshmen 

K f pts. 



Dilroio, If 
McDonotigh. If 
Kioritan, tf 
O'Brien, rf 
Becker, rf 
Pratt, c 

MrKinlcy. c 
l.indsey. lg 

Butler, Ik 

Perkins, re 
Bellino, rg 



15 Thompson Street 

LOCAL SERVICE 



Winchester 6-2990 

LOCAL SERVICE 




~ TYPEWRITERS 
REPAIRED 

WINSLOW 
PRESS 

11 Common Street X 



GOOD NEWS!! 

WINCHESTER EDISON SHOP 
NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS 

at our former location 

8 MT. VERNON ST., WINCHESTER 



OPENING SPECIALS! 




Save $25 on this 
GE RANGE! 

What a buy! Here's a fully automatic G-E electric 
range with Time and Temperature control reduced a 
whopping $-b. Has big master oven, a high-speed 
broiler, fast heating surface units. Thrift. Cooker, gen- 
erous storage space and two appliance outlets, one 
automatically controlled. Model C31G. 



Save $25 on this 
KELVINATOR 

Here s another great special — a big, 8.6 foot 
Kelvinator i model RE) at a saving of $25. over the 
corresponding 1951 model. And see what you get — big 
frozen food chest for fast freezing and holding 35 
pounds of foods and ice cubes; 12-qt. sliding crisper 
for greens; meat storage tray: extra-high space for 
tall bottles, speedy-cube release ice trays. A real value 
at this budget price! 

BUDGET TERMS 



BUDGET TERMS 



$24995 




$229.95 

BOSTON EDISON SHOP 

8 MOUNT VERNON ST., WINCHESTER 



Totals 



Wakefield lrevhmen 



Montgomery, If 
Hennessey, if 
Hollet, if 
Cirnnson, c 
Stephen, \k 
Crop!, Ik: 
I.nytnn. tg 
Jeffrey, rg 

Tot. -ils 

Keferee, Silva 



14 
0 
8 

U 

S3 



12 



10 
4 

ft 
0 



DeMOLAV DANCE 



<>n Saturday evening, February 
the Winchester Chapter Order of 
HeMolay will bold a Record Hop at 
the Masonic Apartments, 1 Mt. 
Vernon street. Everyone is wel- 
come. Bring your girl or come 
alone. Dancing from 8-12. 




•»tt* efS 



of the 
» stand 



Skidding and Kidding 

This week started off with a 
thrill For the children. "No 
Si'ln ml" signals sounded all over 
a< the season's first s'cet storm 
glazed the mads and brought 
most transportation to a stand- 
still. 

1 decided I wouldn't even trv 
for my regular 8:10 train: hut 
walking wasn't bad if vou stuck 
to the side of the road, and I 
readied the station witli plentv 
of time to spare before the 8 :?H 
pulled in. 

I got the last newspaper on 
tlu- rack, ami as I went OVel to 
bliv a k'-ridc ticket the station 
agent said : " I 'lentv of rulers 
t!<is morning, all right. There'll 
lie standing room only before 
yiut eel to town !" 

"What can you do about 
extra passengers in had 
weatberr" 1 asked. "Put on 
in. in- cars " 

"Not in the morning." he re- 
plied. "V\ e iti<t il. .n't have 'cm 
at the out of-tow n ei 
line- Su piople have 
"P 

" I <x> had these new riders 
sec the railroad at its most uti* 
Cumfnrtal le," 1 said. 

"Yep — btst nobodv seems to mind. 
Tlicv're plad enough to he able to 
He! to town. It's tough on the r:u!- 
ro .d jieoplc. though. Thev have to 
Bet ui> even earher than usual — 
scrape tic ice t.'T the car step* — 
sand platforms -* die out switches. 
And then this t s the season when 
people get sick .tad even railroad 
people catch cold sometime*. That 
puts extra work on the re*t of us. 
\Ve have to arrance substitutes — 
work loticer and harder and faster 
to keep thine toinc " 

"Vou railroaders certainlv have to 
be riaht on the ioh," 1 said. 

He smiled and nodded. "We even 
have to Ikt richt neai it. Other- 
wise, how would we ever eet to 
work on time in weather like this"'" 

New faces beyan \u appear at the 
ticket window — faces I hadn't seen 
at the station since last winter. I 
renewed old acquaintanceships — 
struck up new one; — lent half mv 
newspaper to a friend. There was 
m atmosphere of cheer, of warm 
*nd relaxed comfort. 

The 8:28 was rieht on the dot. 
Car steps were clear of ice. The 
station acent ran out ahead of us 
o sp'inkle fresh sand on the plat- 
t rrn. And the recula commuters 
had a lot of fun kidding the new 
riders as we crowded aboard. 



Winchester High rebounded 
from its initial defeat of last Fri- 
day to badly trounce Melrose High 
58 - 35 at the high school gym on 
Tuesday afternoon. After the first 
period the Red and Black had no 
trouble with the visitors and had 
ndled up a 20 point lead by the end 
of the third period which enabled 
Coach Bartlett to use his reserves 
in the final quarter. 

The action was slow throughout 
the first period which saw the 
teams tied at in - 10 at the end of 
that canto. Winchester gathered 
momentum in the second period to 
move into a 2:! - 13 lead at the 
halt' time. The locals continued 
to play good ball through the third 
period w hich ended with Winchester 
leading 12 - 22. It is noteworthy 
that through the middle two peri- 
ods Winchester limited Melrose to 
a total of only 12 points. 

Stowell Symmes and I long 
Hawkins played brilliant hall for 
Winchester while John Dilorio 
turned in his usual steady game as 
he collected 11 points. Symmes was 
literally a "hall of fire" as he was 
all over the floor intercepting 
passes, stealing the hall, and re- 
bounding very well offensively as 
hi' totalled 12 points. Hawkins did 
an effective job of sweeping both 
backboards while scoring Pi points 
to become the high scorer of the 
game. Tin' lied and Black re- 
turned to form on their shooting 
percentage as they made good on 
34 per cent of their attempts at the 
hasket. 

The Winchester Seconds con- 
tinued to score well but their de- 
fence was weak as thev defeated 



SQUARE 
DANCE 



TOWN HALL 
FEBRUARY 9 - 8 to 12 

Have a real good time and help your local 
Chamois Ski Club 



I nn (or Ml '> to 



(HI 



Tickets $1.00 Each to Dance 
Spectators 50c 



WINC HESTER PLAYS 
CONCORD TONIGHT 



GIRL SCOUTS 



the Melr< 



inds by a score of 



01 - 56. Peter Coon with 11 points 
and Norman Howard with 13 points 
weie the high scorers for the Win- 
chester Seconds. 
The summary; 

Winchfstrr Hi»fh 





£ 


f 


pts. 


Svnmies, If 


5 


•> 


12 


Coon. If 


I 


(1 


■» 


Pilorio, rf 


5 


1 


ii 


llonlon. rf 


n 


n 


o 


Hawkins, i" 




(i 


i« 


Forester, c 


t 


0 


•) 


Murphy, Ii? 




t 


Fj 


Cirttrso, Irr 


ii 


0 


(1 


Lour, rg 


t 




s 


Farrell, rg 


1 


0 


2 


Totals 


24 


HI 


58 




Melrose High 








>r 


f 


Pts. 


Senium. !f 


2 


1 


h 


MrMullin, if 




4 




Dnnnghy, rf 


Ii 




2 


Whitney, c 


1 


0 


8 


MuMilmm. !k 


:< 


0 


i; 


Doinnris, 1k 


0 


0 


li 


Skdliy. rg 


0 


0 


(i 


111 nil, re 


1 


(1 


2 


Totals 


14 




us 


Rpferera, <; 


tltigan and Adcigian 







Winchester High plays at home 
tonight as they entertain Concord 
High in a Middlesex League con- 
test at the high school gym. Al- 
though Concord is not a good draw- 
ing card, a good crowd is expected 
to he on hand to witness the locals 



The 
he he 
10 a. 

On 



Stall 
Id, M 

in. 

Monday 



md ( Ubce meeting will 
ndav, February -t at 



afternoon, February 



OPTIMISTIC GIFT 



Sunday morning, 
Jr., pastor of the 



Rev. J< 



playing their first evening game at 
home in three weeks. This current 
■ edition of Red and Black hoopsters 
has caught the fancy of the crowd 
with high scoring, good ball hand- 
ling, and excellent teamwork. An 
outstanding feature of their suc- 
cess has been the excellent scor- 
ing balance as only 15 points sepa- 
rates the top scorer from the low- 
est scorer among the five regulars. 

Winchester faces a rugged 
schedule next week as they play 
two tough opponents away from 
home. On Tuesday afternoon the 
Bed and Black travels to Belmont 
and hope to repeat their earlier 
triumph over Mel Wenner'.s club 
Next Friday evening the locals 
play at Stoneham in a contest that 
will be tough because of the small, 
poorly lighted Stonoham court. 
League Standing 
Winchester f» ' 1 

Lexington S 2 

Belmont 7 3 

Wakefield 
Melrose 
Stoneham 
Beading 
Concoi d 



4 
4 
4 
4 

0 



La 

Snook, Jr., pastor of the Crawf 
Memorial Methodist Church an- 
nounced that the parsonage family 
was presenting their Lenten offer- 
ing in the form of cash from news- 
papers and magazines. Pledging a 
minimum of $50.00, he then made a 
plea to all members and friends of 
the church to bring newspapers 
and magazines to the parsonage or 

Dix street entrance of the church BAPTIST ALL < III "Rf II SOf I A I 
any time, regardless of how small 



fi 
t\ 
10 



\ 



of 

or large the bundle. 

Bundles came the very first 
afternoon and the way the people 
of the church and outside friends 
have been responding to the church 
program, our guess is that the par 
sonage Lenten offering will double 
before the pastor and his wife 
finish with the unique pledge. 



For fun and laughter come to the 
AH-Church Social at the First Bap- 
tist Church, tonight, February 2nd, 
at 8 o'clock in the Social Hall of 
the Church. It is "Home Talent" 
night with all the hilarity that will 
bring. Admission is free. Re- 
fteshments will be served. All 
welcome. 




EXCLUSIVE 
TAILORS and FURRIERS 

CLKAN'SKRS md 1)^ KRS 
I I RS and CI.OTH 
(iARMKNTS 

Remodeled in the Latest Style 



■1 the following group will meet at 
the office: These are the Represen- 
tatives elected to the Senior Plan- 
ning Board. 

Louise Kugler 
Alison Horsey 
Gail St rat ton 
Tina Tonon 
Joy Hewins 
Vivian Bullard 
Grace Mo Peak e 
A Hone Weafer 
Nancy Howling 
Susan Donnell 
All leaders meet on February 7, 
al 10 a. m. at the Legion Hall on 
Vine street. Please bring a tin 
can, size II), tin snips and a pair 
of heavy gloves. 

Mis. Barbara Metcalf will attend, 
the Day ( amp Directors' Meeting 
in Boston on February 8 and IV 

Everyone please put a circle 
around Feburary 13 on your Scout 
Calendar. This will be the date 
of the Winter Meeting of the Mass- 
achusetts Girl Scouts, to be held 
at the Bradford Hotel, Boston from 
in a. m. until 2:3n. If the driving 
i-; good, the office will arrange a 
car pool. 

The Program Committee* works 
every day, every week, all year. 
The response warrants the effort, 
I. ut at present the Committee is 
perplexed by the fact that now we 
have so many Scouts that there is 

enough to *tftkkg«Mw»i 

the S.Mtits and their Fathers can 
meet. This problem and related 
ones have been turned over to a 
special committee. The members 
are Mrs. Edmond Wright, Mrs. 
William Beal, Mrs. A. M. Clark, 
Mrs. A. L. Hartridge, Mrs. W. c. 
Laird, Mrs. J. M. Howling and the 
ire j Co-Chairman, Mrs. Fi nest Parker 
and Mrs. James James McElroy. 
This Committee met on Friday, 
January 2'! at Mrs. McElroy's home 
to discuss various solutions with 
Mrs. J ames W illing, Mrs. Maxwell 
McCreery, Mrs. Robert Lowrv and 
Mrs. Barbara Metcalf. 

Tuesday. January 30, Louise 
Kugler and Tina Tonon went with 
Mis. Barbara Metcalf to Boston to 
attend a meeting at which plans 
for the Senior conference were pre- 
sented. This conference is for all 
Senior Scouts in greater Boston 
and is scheduled for April. 



FUR 

REMODELING — REPAIRING — CLEANING -- STORAGE 



DAVID LEVIN 

713 MASS. AVE. ARLINGTON 
Opposite Town Hall 

OPEN EVENINGS TEL. AR 5-17% 



AROt ND THE MOUNTAIN" 



The "Around th< 
elusion train mad« 
at the Winchester > 
day morning wher< 



Mountain" ex- 
a special stop 
tation last Sun- 
it picked up 2H 



passengers for the all day trip. 
Among the Winchester residents 
were Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wat- 
kins, Miss Eleanor Bancroft. Mrs. 
Clara Reynolds. Mrs. Blanche Rey- 
nolds. Miss Louise Bancroft, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Mar-hall VV. Symmes. 
The train carried '.17* passengers 
and consisted of ii cars. Heavy 
.-now was on t| )( . ground from the 
Mt. Wa.-hington Hotel through the 
Fianconia Notch to North Conwav. 



JUDYS HAIRSTYLES 



ANNOL NCES 

That she and Mary Danehy are back in their salon at 
573 Main Street 

Same Phone Winchester 6-3065 



A Sincere Thank You! 

I would like at tin- time to acknowledge mv obliga- 
tion, and express my deepest and whole-hearted appre- 
ciation i»t' tin- kindness and generosity of a competitor. 
Mr. Fred Stati i Fred the Hair Stylist i. 

For tu» reason other than being a true American and 
appreciating the American way of lit.', lie alone, at 
the time of the tire in Lyceum Building, offered me the 
use of his salon. 

It ha- been a pleasure to have been u^ocialed with 
Kn d and his wonderful >taff. 

liuh 




Dedicated To 
FREEDOM 

Tht stirring i'U-nl <.f freedom '.hat 
wit* the very iif* *«f Lincoln wili 
alu a> a be sujiportt-ii, honurt^i, tontl 
appreciated by American*. Today 
other * mancipatui r* — men of 
science " ab*>r fW fr*?etiom . , 
for reieft&e from the bondage of (in** 
ease ami ph>'»icai suffering, And as 
alht-s of their.s, we <.le :icate our ?>kili 
ami knowied«e to »he rank of help- 
ing the medicat profession give you 
a fu lei measure <■( frwiom from ill- 



WmW 294 WASH ST.ffcW 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 2. 1951 



The Winchester Star 

(Established 1SK0) 
STAR BUILDING 
3 < HI RCH STREET 
WINCHESTER, M VSS. 
Theodore I'. V\ ilson 
Edi'or and Publisher 
I'ublivh.d Every Friday 



SINGLE C OPIES, TEN CENTS 
Left at \ our Residence for 1 t ear 
The Winchester Star. $2.50 in 
Ad\ ance, 

Ne«s Items, Lodge Meetings, So- 
ciet) Events, Personals, etc.. sent 
to thi- office "ill be welcomed by 
the Editor. 

Kr'.H.i ni ili<> iiostoffice ht Winchester, 

The Winchester Star assumes no 
financial responsibility for typo- 
graphical errors in advertisements 
but "ill publish without charge a 
correction in the next issue, or re- 
publish that portion of the adver- 
tisement which i~ incorrect. 

Telephone Winchester 6-003 



Only Newspaper 
Printed In Winchester 

Serving the Community for 
70 Years 

Largest Sworn Circulation 
J Representing Winchester j 

! j 

| Senators in ( ongress | 

Leverett Saltonstall j 

' Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. j 

Congressman, ">th District j 

j Edith Nourse Rogers j 

. Senator 6th Middlesex j 
District | 
I Robert I'. Campbell ^ 

! Representative in General . 
I Court 

{ Harrison Chadwick 

j County Commissioner j 

j James A. C'ullen j 

SEAWAYS IN WAR 



Committee, I would suggest to 
those supporting the project for the 
Winchester secondary schools that 
more light on the facts and less 
heat on personal antagonisms hav- 
ing nothing to do with the issue 
will better serve the interests of 
the town. 

Let them address their attacks to 
the statements made on the floor 
of Town Meeting: 

The need for immediate action in 
1951 is a myth. It may have fooled 
me once but it is not rooted in the 
facts. 

The figure of 374 as a '•Maxi- 
mum Operating Capacity of the 
Junior High School is a figure of 
fancy. In only 4 of the 18 years of 
the life of this building has its pop- 
ulation fallen below that figure; in 
8 years it has exceeded 420. In 
some years it has been 431, 437 
i twice i, 441.442 and evetl 4«2! 

The Building Committee's own 
predictions of the J. H. S. popula- 
tion show that it will not teach 411 
until the fall of 19S4. 

We do not have to begin actual 
building until June. 1954. Certainly 
is no time to embark on such 
an expenditure. 

Richard M. Rush 
t'i Woodside road 



ami background can have wonder- 
ful friendships. May the friend- 
ship between Hemroulle and Win- 
chester keep on growing as a liv- 
ing example of what nations may 
do, if they set their hearts to it. 

Again with my deepest thanks, 
I remain, 

Most sincerely yours. 

(Signed) 

A. Navez 

(Dr. Albert E, Naves,-) 
Consul of Belgium. 

\\ E W VNT NO Did MORS 

Editor of the Stat : 

There have been twenty-foui 
states that have ratified the 22nd 
amendment of the Constitution to 
Limit the Office of President of 
the United States to Two Terms. 
There must be Sfi states to ratify 
Massachusetts has not done so. 
Each time it has come up for a 
vote in the Legislature it has been 
defeated by the Democrats. A 
bill is now before the Legislature. 
We should demand that they rati- 
fy this amendment at this term. 
We want no Socialistic Dictators. 

K. D. Fletcher 
Lagrange street 



Editor of the Star: 

The Fair Dealers will find all 
sorts of excuses in the name ot 
Defence to try to put over then 
pet schemes, many of which lead 
to a Socialistic State. For example 
are River Valley Authorities, Regu- 
lations of timbet cuttings on private 
lands — and other regulations too 
numerous to mention. More and 
moie political henchmen added to 
the all ready padded payrolls 
of Government. The following ar- 
ticle is an example and the Fair 
Dealers are saying that Powei 
from theSt^^^renee River will 
bgtn ."^WffnWHHd. This article 
shows-up the laiiacy of the whole 
thing. 

The proposal to develop the 
Passamaquody power project is 
another ill conceived scheme that 
should be pigeon-holed even though 
Mrs Senator Smith is backing it. 

E, D. Fletcher 
Seaway in War 

Sin,-.' the peacetime arguments 
in favor of the St. Lawrence sea- 
way scheme have failed to win ap- 
proval, the proponents are now 
advancing the wartime argument 
Particularly they insist that iron 
ore from the new Labrador mines 
is essential to replace the dwind- 
ling supplies of high grade Mesahi 
ore, and the St. Lawrence seaway 
is the logical and cheapest means of 
moving it to American steel cen- 
ters. 

Tin new Fortune will observe 
that the chances of approval of the 
seaway by Congress have brighten 
ed because of the defense argu- 
ment, 

But the wartime contention is as 
ill founded as the peacetime. 

There isn't any doubt that it 
would be nice to have a seaway, it 
ii could be had by wishing. But 
building a seaway will take money, 
labor, scarce materials, time and. 
in case of war. special defenses 
against bombing attacks. In weigh- 
ing the advantages of having a sea 
way, you have to count the cost. 

The east coast region of the 
t'nited States already has a sea- 
way on which the Labrador ore 
could bo taken to existing steel 
mills or mills to be built, and that 
seaway is of course the Atlantic ; 
ocean. 

Steel produced in a New England 
mill wouid have the advantage.- ol 
water transportation, proximity to 
markets and to seaports for ship- 
ments abroad and plenty of essen- 
tial scrap. Should we sacrifice the 
natural advantages of this region 
for the costly artificial advantages 
represented by a seaway? 

There are other objections to the 
St. Lawrence scheme that hold itl 
war as well a> peace. For foul 
months of the year it would be ; 
closed by ice. Duiing that time, 
ore would have to be transported 
by railroad But if the railroads 
are to get this traffic for only a 
third of a year, they will have to 
have greatly increased rates te 
handle it. Where then will be the 
savings in a seaway? 

Nor is there a very good cast 
for the emergency need of Labia 
dor ore. The steel companies are 
building gteat new ore ships to 
cairy ore from the Lake Superioi 
mines, and the> are enlarging their 
midwest plants. That doesn't look 
as if the Lake Superior supplies 
were in danger of serious deple- 
tion. And the cost of working 
lower grade ores may well be less 
than the billion or more cost of the 
seaway. 

Before we start changing the 
face of nature at great cost in men 
and materials, why not use what i 
nature has given us" 



"AL" HEARS I ROM HIS 
OLD SKIPPER! 

SHAPE ADVANCE PLANNING 
GROUP 
APO No. 55 
New York, N. V. 
Hotel Astoria. Paris 

15 January 1051 

Deai Mr. Gaum: 

General Eisenhower is always 
happy to hear from those who have 
served with him and wants me to 
thank you for your recent lettei 
which he has just received. 

As to your offer of service, the 
General wishes me to advise you 
that, while the initial set-up of the 
Supreme Headquarters does not 
exist, it will be some time before 
the operational organization is as- 
sembled in full strength. In the 
meantime, we are accumulating a 
reference tile on individuals who 
have indicated a desire to serve 
with this headquarters. Your let- 
ter will In- held in this group in 
oider that your tender of service 
j may receive consideration at the 
proper time. 

Sincerely, 
F. W. Geer, Jr 
I.t. Col. GSC 
Advance Partv 
Mr. Albert F. Gaum 
ti", Washington street 
Winchester, Mass. 

Fd. Note: — As you may have 
guessed the "old retread", A! 
Gaum, is trying to get back into 
! the service, after seeing action in 
World Wars I and II. He succeed- 
ed in getting into World War II 
through General Eisenhower inter- 
esting himself in his case as one 
•who had served with the General 
in World War I. It is said that 
"Ike" never forgets a "buddie" and 
[ the above lettei t.i \1 1 Gaum would 
| indicate there l as been no change 
i in his attitude. 



LECTURES AT AIR WAR 
COLLEGE 

Last Monday Professor Norman 
J. Padelford of »'> Ravenscroft road 
was guest lecturer at the U. S. Air 
War College at Maxwell Field Base 
in Montgomery, Alabama. The Air 
War College has a student group 
of Ilia colonels in the regular Air 
Force who are selected for advance- 
ment to the top-ranking command 
and strategic planning positions in 
the Air Force. The group also in- 
cludes officers from the Naval and 
Marine Air Forces, and a number 
of representatives of the Royal Ait- 
Force from England. The College 
is a part of the Air War University 
which also includes a Communica- 
tions School and an Air Force In- 
stitute of Technology, Dr. Fadel- 
ford, who is Professor of Inter- 
national Relations, was one of a 
group of twelve distinguished gov- 
ernment officials and scholars to 
speak to the College this winter. 
Returning from Maxwell Field, Dr. 
Padelford was tlown to Bedford Air 
Field in the Air Force Special Mis- 
sion plane which formerly was 
General Eisenhower's command 
plane when he was Chief of Staff 
of the Army following World War 
II. Earlier in the season Dr. Padel- 
ford lectured at the National War 
College in Washington which is the 
highest ranking service school in 
the United States. 



TOWN MEETING 
ATTENDANCE STATISTICS 



EVERYONE PRAISED 
HEMROULLE MEETING ! 

Consulat De Belgique 
Boston. Mass. 

My dear Mrs. Toye: 

I have spent this day in complet- 
ing my notes and reports on the 
Hemroulle Friendship program 
at Winchester, and with the re- 
trospect of the few days which have 
elapsed since this ceremony, I can 
now write to you a few of my im- 
pressions of this meeting. 

I am positively certain that no 
better program could have been 
prepared. It was exactly like the 
sentiments which inspired it — 
simple and genuine. The program 
went on without a snag or delay, 
flowing smoothly from one speaker 
to another and bringing to a de- 
licate conclusion a manifestation of 
the highest order of beauty in its 
simplicity. I had a good number 
of reactions to this program and 
everyone did praise the beautiful 
rh:irnctor of the whole ceremony. 

In this period where so much in 
the world depends on the good 
working togethei of everyone who 
loves freedom, our manifestation of 
friendship takes a more profound 
aspect. It shows that people dif- 
fering in language and customs 



January 30, 1951 
Editor of the Star: 

Winchester voters will be inter- 
ested in some statistics relative to 
their representation at Town 
Meeting. January 2!>. 

There were 17!) Town Meeting 
Members present. This is the same 
number as attended the November 
.'10 Special Town Meeting. Con- 
sidering road conditions this seems 
a reasonable figure. 

T h e attendance percentages 
i omitting Members-at-Large) were 
as follows: 

Precinct 1 61 G 
Precinct 2 71)' • 
Precinct 3 — - 91G 
Precinct 4 — 85'; 
Precinct 5 — 70''. 
Precinct 0 — 58' , 
The percentage of all Town 
Meeting Members including Mem- 
bers-at-large was 77' ; present. 
Sincerely yours, 
Mabelle M. Long (Mis. R. W.) 
President, Winchester League of 
Women Voters. 



COLLEGES DO ACCEPT 
WINCHESTER GRADUATES 

"In the last rive years sixty-five 
colleges have accepted OU1 grad- 
uates," said Principal Wade L. 
Grindle of Winchester High School 
when interviewed by School Publi- 
city Director John D- Stevens 
earlier this week. 

Continuing he said, "In the years 
1940- I960 when our youthful boys 
and gills wen- competing foi col- 
lege admission with the returned j 
veterans, we placed in four-year j 
degree-granting colleges approxim- 
ately sixty-five per cent of the col- 
lege course graduates. 

"What became of the other 
thirty-five per cent? Well, fifteen 
per cent were admitted to junior 

colleges. Tell pel cent were ad- 
mitted to other schools of higher 
level education, such as schools of 
music, art. occupational therapy, 
pharmacy, nurses' training, secre- 
tarial training, and other similar 
schools. Many of the students were 
preparing specifically for junior 
college i i these other schools. The 
remaining ten per cent, for one 
reason m another, were admitted to 
preparatoi y schools." 

.Mr. Grindle, how many stu- 
dents make up those percentages?" 
hi' was asked. 

"Three hundred and thirteen 
students have entered four-year 
degtee institutions; sixty-nine have 
entered junior colleges; forty-nine 
have gone to the other higher level 
schools and fifty spent a year in 
preparatory schools." 

"Do you receive complaints about 
the Winchester High School pro- 
duct?" wo ventured. 

"<>n the contrary, we have re- 
ceived excellent reports from the 
colleges, complimentary letters 
from satisfied parents and former 
students, many of whom have been 
pleased that their training equalled 
or surpassed that of their class- 
mates. We have loyal alumni who 
an- proud of Winchester High 
School. 

"Other evidence of the confidence 
in our college preparatory work is 
the families who move to Winches- 
: tor in order that their children may 
go to school here. The Massachu- 
setts Department of Education 
recommends our school highly, and 
college admissions officers are 
eager to get our graduates. They 
recommend us as a college prepar- 
atory school." 

"Would you comment on the 
communication from Mr. Gardner 
that recently appeared in the 
Star?" 

"No. I do not care to comment 
on the letter other than to say that 
the writer asks us to accept his in- 
sinuations that Winchester schools 
are poor on the basis of what some 
one we don't know did not say." 

Having eaten lunch in the New- 
ton High School cafeteria, and 
having sat in the cement stand in 
the spacious Newton High School 
stadium while witnessing an even- 
ing performance of what was ad- 
vertised as an all-school damatic 
production complete with staging 
and scenery, public address system 
and special lighting augmenting 
the outstanding work of the Eng- 
lish, speech, duwnatic, and music 
departments, we didn't feel like in- 
volving the veteran administrator 
in a controversy over those details. 



<2)r. Charles p. 
OPTOMETRIST 

NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 
13 CHURCH STREET 
WINCHESTER, MASS. 



W inchester 6-1021 



mal !-tf 



fiTZG&t/iiv'rmi UlD< 



A HUSBAND'S VERY 

APT TO ROAM, 
WHEN HEAT IS LACKING 
IK1 THE HOME 





IITZGEBAID 

FUEL CO. 

WIMCHESTtR. 6 3000 

OIL BURNER SALE^ERVKE 
FUEL OIL 



INTERNATIONAL WEEK-END 



Members of the Senior Forum of 
the First Congregational Church, 
their parents and friends, parti- 
cipated in their third Annual In- 
ternational Week-end on last Sat- 
urday and Sunday. Forty-one for- 
eign students from twenty-one 
countries and six colleges and uni- 
versities were entertained in the 
homes of 27 Forum members. With 
the exception of Australia, all of 
the continents as well as several 
islands such as Cuba, Puerto Rico, 
Hawaii, and the Philippines, were 
represented in the international 
group. 

The following families enter- 
tained guests in their homes: Mr. 
and Mrs. Isaiah Bullard, Mr. and 
Mrs. Lester Godwin, Mr. and Mrs. 
George E. Traut, Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
C. Dunn, Mr. and Mrs. Ross Cun- 
ningham, Mr. and Mrs. Murray 
Moore, Dr. and Mrs. Norman Padel- 
ford, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Parker, 
and Mrs. William A. Kugler. 

Leon F. Fernandez, 
Robert Lowry, Mr. 
W. Henry Johnston, Mr. 
Wilson Armstrong. Mr. 
Lester R. Snow. Air. and 



L. 



Make Tax 
Savings 



c 



hrrk records show vour 



donations, interest payments 
and other deductible tax items. 

Winchester National 



/ 



BAN K 

WINCHESTER .MASSACHUSETTS 

MIMIIR P f Of R AL D«FO»IT IN»URANC« COK^OAATIOW 



Ba«king Hours 8:00 A. M. to 2:00 P. M. Daily 
Wednesday and Saturday 8:00 A. M. to 12 Noon 



Mr 

Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. and Mrs 
and Mrs. 
and Mrs 

and Mrs. 



Mrs. K. Foster Cleaves, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. Kimball Archibald. Capt. 
and Mrs. Richard M. Rush, Mr. and 
Mrs. B. E. Zinn, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph 
Swan, Rev. and Mrs. Donald B. 
Tarr, Dr. and Mrs. Carle Zimmer- 
man, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Higgins, 
Mr. and Mrs. Colver P. Dyer, Mr. 
and Mrs. Donald C. Davis, Mr. and 
Mrs. Herbert Clark, Mr. and Mrs. 
Raymond C. Thomas, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Chauncy L. Mitchell, Jr. 

This year the observance of In- 
ternational Week-end came on Na- 
tional Youth Sunday, observed in 
many Protestant Churches through- 
out the country. The high-light of 



the week-end was the morning 
church worship service when 
seventy-one Forum young people 
helped in planning and conducting 
the service. The Forum choir of 
fifty-nine voices under the direc- 
tion of Dorothy Brandt received 
high commendation from the many- 
worshippers of the congregation 
which crowded the church. 

Requests from other churches 
have been received for complete and 
detailed information about the 
week-end. 



A Classified Ad in the Star 
brings Results. 



TO RECEIVE BOWDOIN 
DECREE 



F. Proctor Jones, son of Dr. and 
Mrs. Frank L. Jones of 422 High- 
land avenue, will he one of .35 men 
to receive Bachelor of Arts degrees 
from Bowdoin College at special 
Commencement exercises to be held 
in the College Chapel at noon on 
Saturday. February 8. 

Jones, a graduate of Hebron 
Academy, majored in Economics 
at Bowdoin, completing his courses 
at Boston University. Ho is a mem- 
ber of the Sigma Nu fraternity. 

For All the News Read the Stai 



Uon 



Z)lic l^uthcrforil Equipment C^o. 
extends a cordial invitati 
to tjou 

to attend the reopening of its stove 
I I lie shotting of tlte line of 



9 -i 



an i 



First Because the Finest 9 ' 



FITZGERALD CLEANSERS, INC 



Wl 6-2350 



959 Main Street 



Winchester 



-ftotjiaint 

^Appli 



'tan ces 



ASKS THE FACTS 



January 81, 1951 
Editor of the Star: 

Speaking a? an individual and 
not as a member of the Referendum 



WINCHESTER DRUG CO. 

564 MAIN STREET 
TEL. Wl 6-1940 



Earl H. Hull. Kej>. Pharm. 

Oicner and Manager 



Entire store completely restocked 



FREE DELIVERY 




\en 



plus 

a new model hitch 
■2.A Wl. Vernon St., ULcUer, W. 
on and after iJehritary /, 1951 



ass. 



THE WINCHESTER MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 2. 1951 



CLASSIFIED 

LOST AND FOUND 



(^Iturcli +St 



eri'iced 



LOST - In or nt-ar Tuwn Hall la*t J-'n 
'lay a man's billfold. Upward. Call WI • 



St'NDA V. FEBRl Un I. 1931 



FOR SALE 



I M MAI L'LATE CONCEPTION 
CATHOLIC I HL'RCH 



hi. MARY'S CHIRCH 



FOR SALE 

■trnall room* only 



for 

w : • 



Two electric radiator.- fo 
tinuaett, pawl 172. ami $7 



t60. 



la! I WI 



Ma 



erberi K. A. Drtseoll, Pastor 

t'jjhen E. liurke 

•s at 7. * :43. 10 and 11:15. 



Rev. Jtihn P. O'Riordan. 

A-^aistantjt . Rev. Charles 
Rn. Francis O'Neil and 
Walsh. 



Pastor 

Anadore. 
Re». William 



FOR S A I K 

plaid pftort jack 
tf i r 1 " - mat- - .In 
sled - high i hair 
rhamr*". Parish 
11 to 4 p. m. 



THE I.ITHERAN < IITRCH OK 
THE REDEEMER 



Mi it's 

Sunday 



at 7, 9, 10. 11 and 11 :50 
School after the y o'clock 



a. m 

Mass 



nil's - 
- lord 
Hon* 



thirt 
nIio* 



1 OK 

ark ci 



SALE 

ii r. -i/.t 



overbhia-s - 
ea - -hia-i-katt". - 

re. Epiphany E\- 
Qpen Tuertdays. 



ink rat 
WI 



Montvale Ave., Woburn 



NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHI RCH 



Res. 
Tel. 



Ralph Hjulm. Pa.itor 
1 1 ^ Montvale A\enue 
WO 2.307" 



FOR SALE 

friiteralor. in 
WI B- 1154-W 



6-142::. 

s cu. ft. Weatinfrhouae re- 
Kood condition. $100. Call 



< Morning Worship - 11:00 A. 
Church School - 9:43 A. M. 



Rev. Virgei* BUI. Pastor. 

itO Pleasant View Avenue, Everett. 
Tel. EVerett 3-0»2ti-M. 

10:43 a. m. Morning Service. 

l lltST CHl'HCH Of CHRIST 
SCIENTIST. WINCHESTER 



FOR SALE! Iron-Rite ironer, one year 
and a half old, perfetM condition, $123. Call i 
WI E-0067-J 

FOR SAFE Well seasoned fireplace 
wood mostly oak. Ilrazel's Poultry Farm. 
WO 2-2391 - 2-0452 jan!2-4t' 

FOR SAFE. — Rebuilt washing machine 
and electric refrigerators, standard reliable 
makea only. Oahm and Krickaon Co., Inc. 
44ft Mauf Ave., Arlington. Tel. Aldington 
S-4.'52;i d9-tf 

FIREPLACE WOOU FOR SALE — 
Mostly oak, well seasoned, cut any length, 
delivered to cellar; also kindling for aa'i". 
3. C. Walker, WAyland. US Ring 3. 

BcptS-tf 



CHURCH OF THE EPIPHANY 

Rev. Uwight W. Hadley, Rector. Rec- 
tory. .1 (.lengarry. Tel. Winchester 6-1261. 
I'arUli Hnu-e. Tel. Winchester 6-1922. 



the same hour 



Sunday 
* :00 a, 
;i ;30 a. 
11 :00 i 
Preacher. 



February l 
m. Holy Coniniu tiion 
m. Church School, i Upper School' 

m Holy Communion. Sermon, 
The Roy. F Randall Williams of 



Sunday Services at 11 
Sundny School is held 
; as the church service. 

Wednesday testimonial meeting 8 p. m. 
Reading loom. 5 Winchester Terrace 
(off Thompson Street). Open daily ex 
ei'Pt Sundays and holidays from 11 a. 
! to 4 p. m. 



WANTED 



W \ STETI 

ork a# mot 
eferencen gi' 



ell 



filling woman would like 
* helper or babv sitter. 
Call WI 6-1633-R 



Cucro, Tevas 

1 I tOO a to. Kindergarten and Primary 
6:30 ],. rh. Suppei for teachers and 
officers of Church School. Speaker Rev. 
Bradford H»-tiiig- of Trinity Church, Con- 
con! 

Tuesday, February tl 
10:13 a. m. Holy Communion. Sewing. 
Surgical Dressings. Church World Ser- 



WANTFO Housework bs the day. 

baby-sitting, part or full time Experienced. 
Call WO 2-2237-W 



WANTED One 

with private bath, 
apartment. Hum* i 
ter. Arlington or 
Office Box W-2!i. 

WANTED TO BUV 

in good neighborhood. 



two rooms furnished, 
a separate or private 
children, In Winches- 
I'xiogton. Write Star 
feb2-2t 



Call 



bedroom house. 
WI 6-2799 It 



W ANTED 

near Church 
0481. 



CAR ACE 

and Lewis 



Garage 

load. Call 



space 
W 1 0- 



Antiques Wanted 

Call Mr. Reebenacker 

A Reliable Dealer 



REading 2-1991 



sept29-tf 



vice 

12:30 p. m. Luncheon 

Ash Wednesday. February 7 

7 on a. rn. Holy Communion 
10:13 a. rri Hol>' Communion 
7 13 p. rn. Evening Prayer and Ser- 
mon. Preacher The Rev. John Snook. ,lr. 
Friday, February 9 

Women'.-. World Day ,,f Prayer at First 
Congregational Church. 



SECOND CONGREGATION A I. CHURCH 

Washington St. at Kenwin Rd. 
Rev. John William Cook. Minister 
473 Washington Street 
T.-l. WI 6-16HS 
Mrs, George H. I.ochman. Organist 



Sunday. February I 

'.'.13 a. m. Church School. Mrs, Rony 
Snyder, superintendent. Classes for ages 



rn. Morning Worship. Holy Corn- 
Mr. George Foskitt will be in- 
Deacon. 

m. The Youth Group will attend a 
Endeavor Rally at Park Street 



tn 

11 :00 a 
munion. 
Mailed as 

, * ifW P- 
I 'hristian 



MISCELLANEOUS 



DOMESTIC HELP Full or part time 
domestic help. Nurse,' Registry. Dennison 
Home Service ST u-1407-M. ianl2-4t" 

SAGGING SPRINGS In upholstered 
furniture seats repaired and completely 
restored to original position with SAG 
PRUF Work done in your home. Divan 
120.76; chair. $9.75. Written Lifetime 
guarantee. Quality Upholstering aince 
1901. R. L. Wicks & Sons Co. Call 
BKL r,-09f'l jy9-tf 

UPHOLSTERING & CANE SEATING— 
For expert worK of all kinds. Call Miss 
Davis. WI 6-OMfi-M (formerly Hobby & 
Craft Nook i or B ft S Upholstery Co. AR1. 
6-1818 Ja6-tf 

HELP — For tie Problem Drinker i 
There is a way out! Alcoholics Anonymous 
can show you! Write P. O. Box 188. Win- 
c heate r. ja20-tf 

TRAVEL INFORMATION —Tor reser- 
vations on Airplanes. Ships, Trains, and 
at Hotels anywhere in the United States 
or foreign countries. Call your Author- 
ized Travel Agent. J. F. MrGrath. Jr., 
Travel Service, WOburn 2-12:14 or Win- 
Chester 6-3130. £ 19 I tf 

WEDDING LAKES — When you want a 
real nice one. or a birthday cake that will 
thrill you. call a studio that makes a 
specialty of only the best in party cakes 
of any kind. Delivery can be made. Tel. 
Emile Maniuis. M Central street. Woburn. 
WOburn 2-1773. f6-tf 

EXCHANGE OF SERVICES Would 
lovingly accompany elderly person or child 
to Florida. Or drive, or assist in driving t,. 
Fieri, la in exchange (or trip down. Leaving 
about Feb. tB. Tel Mrs. Alice Miller, nnv 
e-. cr.ing Vv I i -t" I--H « 

HELP WANTED 

WANTED Avon CosemetiCB are m 



1 Church. Boston. 
Activities for the Week: 

Tuesday. February 6 

1 :00 p. m The Bethany Society will meet 
at the church for dessert and their regular 
! meeting. 

7:00 p. rn. The Youth Group will attend 
a Sagamore Union meeting of Christian 
Endeavor at West Medford. 

Wednesday. February 7 

7:1" p. m. The First in the Series of 
Union Lenten Services „t the Church of 
the Epiphany. Rev. John Snook. Jr. will 
preach. 

s;43 p. m. The Merry Marthas will meet 
at the home of Mrs. George Hendricks, fi 
Kenllworth road 

Thursday. February S 

7 :0u p. m The Chancel Choir will re. 
hearse at the church. 

H:00 p. m. Adult Group. Dr. Charles Mc- 
Connell, Boston University School of 

Theology, speaker 

Friday, February 9 

3:00 p. m. The Junior Choir will re- 
hears** at the church. 
I inning Events: 

February 11. Boy Scout Sunday. 

February 14, 1'nion Lenten Service at 
Methodist Church 

February 13. Church and Prudential 
Committees. 

Febriinry 10 - Is. Open House nt the 
Parsonage 



The spiritual understanding that God 
is infinite Love, which reveals the way of 
spiritual deliverance from tyranny, con- 
flict, fear, and pain, will be the topic of 
next Sunday's services in all Christian 
Science churche-. The Lesson-Sermon is 
entitled "Love." 

The Golden Text js taken from 
Zephaniah's exhortation to Jerusalem 
I Zephaniah ',.17,. "The Lord thy God in 
the midst of thee is mighty : he will save, 
he will rejoice over thee with joy , he will 
rest in his love, he will joy over thee with 
tinging." 

Readings from the Bible include the fol- 
lowing Statement by John, the beloved dis- 
ciple: "We have known and believed the 
love that God hath to us. God is love: and 
he that dwelleth in love dwellelh in God. 
and God in him" ii John 4:16i. 

Among the correlative passages from 
Science and Health with Key to the 
Scripture-" by Mary Baker Eddy is the 
following: "For true happiness, man must 
harmonize with his Principle, divine Love: 
the Son must he in accord with the Father, 
in conformity with Christ" (n. S3t), 



WIN! HESTER I NITARIAN CHURCH 
Mystic Valley Parkway and Main Street 



WINCHESTER ART 
VSSOC'l VTION MEETING 

Architecture and music ait- close- 
ly related. Centuries, even thou- 
sands i'f years UK", early man lived 
in huts surrounded by palisades of 
bamboo cane. The pith dried in the 
cane leaving a hollow across which 
tin- wind blew at night irivinR a 
-mind like the pipes of I'an. A na- 
tive more l»>ld than others stole 
forth at night to investigate the 
source of this sound and Found it. 
That was the origin of the wood 
wind instruments of our orchestras, 
according to Edward MacDowell, 
American composer, in his hook 
"Critical and Historical Essays" He 
als,, was adept with the pencil and 
the brush, 

Today's music like some of our 
art has reverted to that period, yet, 
in the mind of Jerome Bailey Fos- 
toi of Winchester architecture re- 
mains at its high level and as sup- 
plied at our cultural centre, the 
m. Winchester Public Library, music is 
to he heard in the art library at its 
highest development. So under the 
same roof we have music and ar- 
chitecture at its highest develop- 
ment next Tuesday evening, Feh- 
rtiary (i, when Mr. Foster appears 
l.efore the Winchester Art Associa- 
tion to talk on Contemporary Ar- 
chitecture in Winchester of which 
he has produced much. 

On the walls of the art gallery 
will he seen pictures and sketches 
of Mr. Foster's work here in Win- 
chester some of which has l,een re- 
produced in the Magazine House 
Beautiful, especially the home of 
the T. R. Aldrich family on Swan 
road. Photographs and plans of 
this house will be shown as well 
as pictures of the home of Mrs. 
Cutler Downer on Everett avenue. 
In the (Jinn estate is the Marjorie 
Mills house also from the hoard of 
Mr. Foster. Across town on 
Worthen road as it climbs the hill 



WINCHESTER HOY SCOUTS — 
(T B SCOUTS 



Robert A. Storer. Minister 
Mrs Mary Ranton Witham, Director of 
Music and Organist 
Mis. Walter Smalley, Church Secretary. 
Church Telephone - Winchester 6-0949 



February 1. 1951 
M Junior Choir - 



Sunday 
!>:W A. 
Room 

9:30 A. M Upper 
. ice - Meyer Chapel 

ll:iid A. M. Lower 
Hall 

II :00 A. M. Service of Worship. Sermon: 
"The Still Waters" 

7:00 P. M. Metcalf Union 

Meyer Chapel open daily for prayer and 
meditation. 



Metcalf Union 
School Worship Set- 
School - Lawrance 



5 th 
6th 



February 
February 
ing 

1'eht uary 7th 
at Episcopal ch 

February 8th 
mittee Meeting 

February !>th 



7 :■ 0 P. M. Hoy Scouts 
10:00 A. M. Sewing M, 



et. 



P. M. Lenten Service 
P. M. Standing Cottl- 



2:15 P. M. Motion Choir 
2 ::»» I'- M. World Day of Prayer. First 
Congregational Church in Ripley Chapel. 

February 10th 7 :43 P. M. Valentine 
Dance. Sponsored by the Junior High Fel- 
lowship. 



FIRST RAPT1ST ( HI'RCH 

Mt. Vernon and Washington 



Corner 
streets. 

Uev. Walter Lee Bailey. Minister 
Residence: 1.1 Fairmount Street, 
phone Winchester 0-0127. 



Tele- 



FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 
110 Year* of Service to Winchester 



W Lawrence Cook Organist and Director 
of Senior and Youth Choirs 

Mis Dana R. Perkins. Soloist and 
Director of Junior Choir 

John Hunt Chappie. Youth Director 
* * • 

Mis H. Stanley Kinsley. Church School 
Superintendent 

Church Office hours : 

Tiles lay and Wednesday mornings 

Tile], hone Winchester K-2864, At other 
times call Mrs, L. F. I.cavitt. WI f..::062. 



Uev. Howard J. Chidley, D. D. Minister. 
Reside nee. Fern way. 

Rev. Donald II. Tarr. K. T. ft.. Assistant 
and Director of Religious V. location. WI 6- 

I ORIS 

J. Albert Wilson, Organist and Choir- 
master. Tel. MYstic S-4972. 

Mrs James F. Canning. Church Sec- 
retary. WI 11-0:128. 

Mrs. Donald It. Tarr. Ii. S. Assistant Di- 
rector of Religious {education ; Secretary. 
; Chinch School, WI « - 1 0 r. 0 

Miss Kline A. Relcher, Executive Hostess 
I Chinch, WI G-17K6: Home, WI 6-1B45-W 



No 

•v i 

Prelude 



Cen- 



■nting i>i 
»ry Mi 

Ml. I, Helen 



Mass 



n e\p, | I- 

Ak-tm. 
feb2-2t 



OFFICE WORK IN 
WINCHESTER 

Stenographer - Clerk 
wanted for Winchester 
Engineering Office. Apply 
in writing. P.O.Box 129. 
Winchester. 

TO LET 



Sun, lav. February 
Communion Sunda 
!»:S0 a. m. Pastor's 
9:S0 a. m. Church 
" "o a. ni Men s Hr 
\\ Win, doom, politic 



Class 

SchllO 

itherhi 
1 1 new 



in tin 

.Ml M 

< edit. 



Arthur 
a' the 



M r 



>:4S a 
i:15 a 
Baile 



P 



P 



Id IF I 



Room peat Wedgeniere Sta- 
, Call W I B-U15 0 

I OR RENT I'nf i 

-room apart- 
ment and hath. $su per month Write Son 
F x M- e 

SECOND C.K VIM" VSSEMBI > 

at (;eok(;e w vshin<;ton 

SCHOOL 

Tin pupils of Miss Haley's 
second grade entertained their fel- 
tow -pupils and guests on Thursday. 
January 'J."yth. 

The following t>>nk 
play dealinir with "He, 



-tnte Home, will be the speak, 

Nor-er\ and Kindergarten 
Horning Worship Sermon bv 
The Meaning and Challenge 
Observance ( ,f the Lord's Supper, 
m. Y'outh Fellowship, 
'. February % 
m Boy S its. Troop 7, in Re- 
creation Hall 

Wednesday. February 7 
7:45 p. m Union Lenlon Service in the 
Church of the Epiphany. Sermon by Rev. 
John Snook. Jr. 

Thursday, February B 
6".4S p. hi. Y'onth Choir Rehearsal 
7 :S0 p m. Senior Choir Rehearsal 
Friday, February & 

2 :» p m World Day of Prayer ob- 
served in Ripley Chapel. First Congrega- 
tional Church 

Saturday. February 1" 

*'• ••:'•" P m. All-chtifch supper put on by 
tin Young Adult group. Religious film to 
he shown fell, .wing meal Tickets from 
anj member of the Y'.enig Adult group. 



\t Sunday morning, at 10:45, Dr Chid- 
preach a pro-lenten sermon on 
to Lent " 
Church School Hours 

Intermediate and Junior High Depart- 
ments at St : 30 ; Nursery. Kindergarten. 
Primary, and Junior Departments at 10:1",. 

Senior Forum at B:30. 

Events of the Week 

Monday 

7 :00 P M - Troop 111. Hoy Scout Meet- 
ing in Parish Hall. 
Tuesday 

H':"» V M. - Social Service Sewing in 
Kindergarten Room 

'-'•"" 1' M - Home Chinch Guild Meet- 
ing in Ladies' Parlor. 

« I' M. - Wednesday Night Club's 
S ear I nt. :,nd Square Dance at 9:00 in 
Parish Hall 

Wednes lay 

1 t-43 1' M - \-h Wednesday Lenten 
Service, Church of the Epiphany. Rev. John 
Snook. .It . Preacher. 

Thursday 

2:30 I' M - toil Scut Meeting in Small 
Parish Hall 

7:t.'. P. M 

Friday 

•-•::m P. M. 
Ripley Chapel 

Saturday 

! A M 



Senior Choir Rehearsal. 
- Wor d Day of Praver 



Ch, 



Rehearsal. 



WASHINGTON MOTHERS' 
ASSOCIATION HELD DANCE 



The Mothers and Dads 
George Washington S<ho< 
thcii guests, enjoved a very 



I II \W LORD 



MEMORIAL 
t III R( H 



METHODIST 



FRIEND! V ' 1H Id II AT 
FORK OF THE RO*D 



THE 



Rev. John Snook. Jr.. 
dime til Oil St. - fi-0 1 .(9. 

W Kavmond (base, 
of the Sundav School I5S 

»:.:its< 

Mr. Charles P Potter. 



Minister. Resi- 

lieneral Supt. 
< amhridge St.. 

Organist and 



in t 



Announcer 
"Linda .lean 



P 



Play 
1. earns 
Act I 



part 
,1th". 
ennv Borde 



i.. 



a I. 



( holr Director 

>lorning Ser.ire 

Sundav School 

S:1il a. m. - Junior 
Depts. 

I0:4S a. m - Nursery, 
and Primary Depts. 



10:45 a. m. 

and Intermediate 

Kindergarten 



essun 



Characters : 

Si-t* rs — 

Littda .lean Parsons 
Janet Keppler 
Beverly Bailey 
Judith Donman 
Other Characters: 
Andy Sjoholm 
Parker Gray 
Mary J Lambiase 
(iloria Kotundi 
.lanet Cussen 
Bonnie Low 
Guild Nichols 
Robert Hanley 
Illustrations for this 

drawn by some of the 

pupils. 

Act II 

Characters 

Rones 

Skin 

Fingernails 
Hu;r 
Teeth 
Eves 
Lungs 
Throat 
Stomach 
Head 

Arms and Legs 
Ears 
Bran 

Closing poem — 



Announcements 

S hject for the morning - "On Iteing 
Vble To Take It" 

At the Methialist Youth Fellowship. 
Shirley Kinney will have charge of devo- 
tions and Richard Hussey will lead the dis- 



This Week: 

Tuesday 

6:38 P M 
Party. Commit! 
Ralph Pingree 
Hsr, ,ld Rerquis' 
MacKen?.ie. and 
mann. Dr and M 
Mr. and M'- Lat 
rieti Couples are ci 
Ftir information 



of the 
>l with 
gay, as 

successful, dancing party 
hool on Saturday evenirm-, 
27th. 

■piece orchestra, directed 
Jim (haffe. was pro- 
perfect for every type of 
both old ami new with a 
Peel thrown in for uood 
Naturally, by catering to 
wide variety of tastes in 
dancing, every one was kept happy, 
Mrs. Frank Carver, chairman of 
the Ways and Means Committee, 
and her assistants presided over a 
popular 'cake-bav' at the rear of 
the hall. 



MARRIAGE INTENTIONS 



well as 
at the s i 
January 
A six 
by Mr. 
nouneed 
dancing 
Virginia 
measure 
such a 



is the colonial type home of Loring I P'ete 
P. Gleason and now across town in 
the opposite direction at the corner 
of Fenwick road and Grove street is 
the Georgian Colonial mansion of 
(i. Russell Mann, a former presi- 
dent of the Winchester Art As- 
sociation and a well known artist. 
Both of these exquisite homes were 
designed by Jerome Bailey Foster. 

Depressions are not pleasant 
things to think about hut the de- 
pression of 1932 placed Mr. Foster 
in his right niche. After graduating 
from Worcester Academy he took 
a post graduate course at Winches- 
ter High School. He was preparing 
to hecome a chemical engineer but 
during a summer vacation he 
worked in an achitect's office and 
then decided to enter the architec- 
tural course of the Boston Archi- 
tects' Club where he studied nights 
for six years some of which time he 
spent in the offices of the C. H. 
Tenny Company of Boston. In 1932 
Mr. Foster came to Winchester to 
open his practice as an architect. 

His work is not confined to 
homes. Along Memorial Drive as 
we drive into Boston are three big 
buildings, the General Electric, Du- 
Pont's and the Parke Davis Com- 
pany structures on. which Mr. Fos- 
ter is the consulting architect. 

Recently Jerome Bailey Foster 
submitted to the townspeople a 
very interesting: and workable plan 
for the Junior and Senior High 
Schools and a partial solution of 
the traffic problem in the center of 
the town. 

Blanche F. Mann and Marion 
Ladd are to he the hostesses at Le- 
Petit Gourmet as announced by 
Mrs. Vivien Frazier, chairman of 
the Hospitality Committee. This 
will furnish an opportunity for the 
members of the Art Association to 
view the pictures and drawinirs of 
houses as well as many plans that 
Jerome Bailey Foster will have 
covering the walls of the art pal- 
lory. Incidently Mr. Foster as a 
young man in this town was an ex- 
cellent tennis player and not lonir 
since was enticed to sit behind the 
drums at a meeting of some of his 



Plans are now well under way for 
the Roy Scouts to take over' the 
administration of the Town of Win- 
chester on Thursday, the 8th of 
February, the -list Anniversary of 
the founding o f the Boy Scout 
Movement in America, the de- 
serving Scouts have been chosen 
for the many and varied jobs, in- 
teresting programs have been laid 
out for them by the various depart- 
ments of the Tow n, and an instruc- 
tive and timely program has been 
developed for a Town Meeting. 

The various posts in the Town 
Government, over a hundred of 
them, were assigned by lot to the 
various Troops in town, with pre- 
cautions taken to assure that any 
one troop would not get a dispro- 
portionate share of the 'gravy' posi- 
tions. Some of the positions to be 
filled include the Board of Select- 
men, School Committee. Library 
i Staff and Trustees. Board of As- 
sessors, Fire and Police Depart- 
ments, Superintendent of Schools, 
i Welfare Hoard. Tax Collector, 
Town Treasurer, Town Clerk, Park 
Commissioner, Superintendent of 
Streets, and many others. The 
Scouts will not be mere observers; 
they will actually take over the 
duties of the offices they occupy 
(under proper supervision and 
guidance of course. Thus, the School 
Committee will interview prospec- 
tive teachers, the Hoard of As- 
sessors will assess, the Tax Collec- 
tor will collect taxes, the Library- 
Staff will take over complete 
operation of the Town Library, etc. 
The single exception is that the 
Superintendent of Schools will not 
declare a month vacation. 

This program for Roy Scout Day- 
has been well planned and the 
town officers and employees have 
pitched in with hearty and corn- 
cooperation;. The event 
] should not only prove to be ex- 
tremely interesting to the boys, but 
I should give them a keen insight in- 
to the affairs and management of 
I the Town. 

The afternoon program will he 
followed and complemented by a 
mock Town Meeting in the even- 
ing. This will take place at the 
Lincoln School and will be run ex- 
actly like 'regular' Town Meetings, 
except of course that the decisions 
will not be binding. An agenda has 
been chosen to be of interest both 
to the Scouts and to the town as a 
whole. The four items to be de- 
bated are: 

1. Alternation and expansion of 
the present Junior High School in- 
to a Senior High; 

2. Alternation o f the present 
Senior Hiph School into a Junior 
High; 

M. Construction of a Fire Sta- 
tion on the West Side; and 

■J. Steps to improve the condi- 
tions at Winter Pond. 

A warrant for this 'special' Town 
Meeting has been printed and will 
lie distributed. The Roy Scouts will 
serve as Town Meeting Members, 
and all town residents, both young 
and old. are invited to attend. 



I 



TROOP 1 CH \TTER 

The Girl Scouts of Troop I are 
a busy lot this w inter. 
For Service: 
They have addressee 
lopes for the March of 
On Monday evening, 
they responded to the 
of "pass the boxes for 
of Dimes" at our local 

To earn their 
Trips they have 

baby sitting and home helping, 
serviced very successfully two 
birthday parties: — 

On January 20. Roberta Coon 



Moo enve- 
Dimes. 
January 21 
urgent call 
the March 
theater, 
do-re-mi for Ski 
besides the usual 



LeYat 
■brate 



if 10T, 

eighth 



friends in an orchestra 
days. So we have under 
tor's hat the meeting 
music and architecture. 



>f earlier 
Mr. Fos- 
again of 



their 



TWO CONTRACTS I NIiKRW 
FOR VI KWIFF BROOK 
IMPROVEMENTS 



VV 



This past woe';, the contracting 
firm of T. R. Rawson, Incorporated 
>f Woburn, started construction on 
\hv second section of the riprapping 
of the Alewife Brook between Arl- 
ington and Cambridge. This will 
present work to 
lvenue. 

isetts District Com- 
to the Rerke- 
contract for 



continue tic 
Massachusett 
The Massac 
mission also awai ded 
Moore Company the 



i'i 



uples' Club Valentine 
• includes Mr. and Mrs 
.'hairmeni, Mr. and Mrs 
Mr and Mrs William 
Mr and Mrs Hen Herr- 
i's. Charles Mingins and 
rence Kinney. All mar- 
rdially invited to attend 
WI K.Js.",^. The 



lie 



Han 



P Folger of 



act were 
second grade 



Richard Keene 
Faith Peaslee 
John Crmson 
John Carpenter 
Richard deRevere 
William Washburn 
Joyce Gilbert! 
L'ddie McElhinney 
John Swift 
Joyce Hanson 
David Lunden 
Sammy Wilder 
Fnc Wittet 
Paul Mullov 



William Russell Peters, Boston 
road. Andover, and Patricia Jean 
Martin, 9 Manchester road. 

John Joseph Cumminirs Jr., 98 
Nelson street. Providence, R. I., 
and Alice Francis Nash. 50 Nelson 
street. 

Louis John DeNapoli. Sum- 
mer street. Arlington, and Joanne 
Theresa Luongo, 23 Irving street. 

Charles J o s e p h Lentine, J.'i 
Fowl,, street, Woburn, and Edith 
Marie Capone. 51 Spruce street. 

Charles Franklin Doe. 50 Follen 
street, Cambridge, and Shirlev 
Holbrook Bonnell, 10 Fells road. 



the building ot a new pumping sta- 
tion in the rcai "f the present 
pumping station at the junction of 
Alewife Brook Parkway and Myst ic 
Valley Parkway. This pumping 
station is necessary to put into 
operation the l»0 inch pipe for the 
removal of sewerage and pollution 
from the Alewife Brook and the 
Mystic River. This will also re- 
move much of the pollution from 
lower Mystic Lake, which is now- 
polluted b y the sewerage over- 
flowing from Alewife Brook. 

This work is being done as the 
result of legislation requested by 
Representative Henry E. Keenan of 
Arlington. Riprapping will lie con- 
tinued to the Mystic River. This 
will help to clear up and beautify 
the Alewife Brook and the Mystic 
River and improve the appearance 
of the two parkways, 



s|Haker M'tl 
Everett 

Wednes, lay, February 7 
T:4."> P. M. - Ash Wednesday Service at 
the Church of the Epiphany Rev. John 
Snook. Jr.. will bring the message. 
Thursday 

Women's Society of Christian Service 
program Luncheon a' 1 P M. by the Main 
Street group The meeting will follow the 
luncheon with Mrs Mildred Dodge in charge 
of devotion* Ptcti res of the Cirl Scout trip 
to F.ngland will he shown. All members and 
friends of the ch reh are invited to attend. 

r riday 

2 P M - World Day of Prayer at the 
1st Congregational Church 

Next Sunday. February 11 

There will be a reception of members. I; 
also marks the beginning of the 4th year 
of the present pastor and family in Win- 
chester. The subject for the morning. 
Value of Friends " 

Note - The pastor wishes to express hi. 

sincere thanks for the response of close to tor, laymen and the church. 

0 • men who are om-e again aiding in the A reception of new members will 

Personal \ .si-atmn program on the part of f „> _i ' o I r , , , 

•• laymen h was a real inspiration and taK , e P lace Sunday February 11th 
many thanks are m order. and later on in the season. 



AT WINTKR C ARMV VI. 



PASTORS' ASSOCIATES MET 

Close to 25 men of the Crawford 
Memorial Mtehodist Church met at 
the parsonage last Sunday evening 
to arrange a program of Laymen 
\ isitation. 

This is a part of Methodism na- 
tionwide Personal Visitation 
"The Evangelism and has proven a great 
strength and inspiration to the pas- 



Miss Nancy Doten of 25 Oxford 
street was the euest of Charles 
Hart, Jr., of •'? Felsdale Close, at 
Vermont Academy's Winter Carni- 
val, which was held over the last 
weekend. Vermont Academy's an- 
nual Winter Carnival, first held in 
1909, is the oldest event of its kind 
in the country. 

In a meet between Vermont 
Academy, Deerfield Academy, and 
Kimball Union Academy, which ex- 
cited the crowd, Vermont Acad- 
demy's team took top honors. A 
hockey game, basketball game, the 
Carnival Ball, ice skating, and an 
out-door picnic provided an excit- 
ing time for the students and their 



helped Richard 
Church street tf 

birthday, 

O n January 27, Nancy Morse and 
Beth Hewins, equipped with good 

games ami movies helped Ronnie 
MacLellan of 7 Parker road enter- 
tain 21 guests in honor of her ninth 

birthday. 

And last but not least 
Ski Trips: — 

The Waterville. X. IL, trip is 
now but a happy memory. 'Mid- 
years over, a gay crowd gathered 
at the Herseys at 8:00 o'clock on 
the morning of Friday, January 10. 
other young people on their "way 
to school gazed with envy at the 
1* pairs of skis and poles, 1* pairs 
■ if skates, sleeping bags, duffle, 
• ■outs, lunch boxes and happy faces 
that finally found places to rest in 
the three cars waiting to take them 
on their first hig ski week-end. It 
was a beautiful day to be driving 
up into the mountains, more like 
spring than winter and alter a 
hilarious session of games, son«'s 
and just plain chattel', noon time 
found them practically monopoliz- 
ing a diner in Plymouth. \. H. 
Shortly, thereafter, then- ir,. a i 
stored in their bunk rooms, they 
were out on the open slopes skiing 
until dark. In spite of the mild- 
ness of the weather with its sticky 
snow for the rest of the week-end, 
the trirls were active every minute 
of the time with a cross country 
ski jaunt Saturday morning anil 
plenty of skatintr. Friday niuht 
there were inspirational ski mo- 
vies and Saturday nijrht dancinc, 
square dancing and sintrini; with a 
group of forty young people from 
Gloucester. You just couldn't help 
Sinclair and daneintr when hand- 
some young Father Donnelly sat at 
the piano. It is a rare gift to be 
able to make a piano talk like that. 
Sunday mornintr a drenchinir down- 
pour put an end to skiing and skat- 
inu but did not dampen the spirits. 
After the cars were loaded for the 
return trip home, all those young 
in spirit sat in a larce circle on the 
floor and played games till lunch 
was called. 

"A Girl Scout is a Friend to All". 
The horizons for this group are al- 
ready widening. 

Don't forget our Mother's Ser- 
vice! Call Alison Hersev, Win- 
chester 6-0093 or Nancy Morse. 
Winchester r,-l558-.I for one of our 
lists of names. 



Two of the town's fire fighters, 
Firemen Walter Skerry and John 
Pearson, underwent major opera- 
tions Wednesdav morning at the 
Winchester Hospital. 




A Shock Absorber 
For Your Budget 



Financial requirements rarely run on an even 
line. From time to time there are sure to he extra 
needs which cannot be foreseen but which should be 
anticipated. 

A cash reserve is a cushion that will absorb 
the shock of financial emergencies. Re prepared 
with a growing Savings Account at the Winchester 
Trust Company. Plan your budget to include sys- 
tematic saving for future needs. 



Winchester Trust Company 

35 CHI RCH STREET • 16 MT. VERNON ST. 

WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

MEMBER FEDERAL OEPOSIT iN»u»»NCE CORPORATION 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 

BANKING HOURS: 8 A. M. to 2 P. M. 
Except Wednesday and Saturday 8 A. M. to 12 Noon 



LINCOLN SCHOOL NOTES 

"Spanish Explorers," an original 
three-act play by fifth graders of 
the Lincoln school was presented 
last week. 

Illustrating their social studies 
classwork, pupils of Miss Irene K. 
Mitchell depicted Cortex's conquest 
of Mexico, Coronado's exploration 
of the Southwest, and De Soto's 
discovery of the Mississippi. 

The cast, Act I: 
Introduction - James Falzano 
Cortez - David Gavostes 
Friend - Gordon Lavelle 
Soldiers - Philip Pollard, Timothy 

Amundsen 
Montezuma - Charles O'Connor 
Indians - Doris Mele, Henry Han- 
son, James Lindsev 

Act II 
Coronado - Gregg Wood 
Explorers - Martha Fish, Edward 

Carter, Kathryn Eden, Roberta 

Rich, Carol Monson 

Act III 
De Soto - Janis Bushong 
King - Peter Gowing 
Spaniards - Mary Becker, Martha 

Schiekmann, Carolyn Hutching, 

Peter Painey, Cosino Paonessa 
Indians - Phyllis Russo, C 1 a r a 

Hevvis. 



MOFFETT 

TAXI SERVICE 

Winchester 61 730 

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GALUFFO S TAXI 

Weddings and Long Trips 
Special Rates 

TEL. WI 6-0602 

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ALLEN'S TAXI 

PROMPT DEPENDABLE 
SERVICE 

Call Winchester 6-0792 

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HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA 
AT ARLINGTON 

The Winchester High School Or- 
chestra and the Arlington High 
School Orchestra played a concert 
on Friday morning, January 2*>, for 
the faculty and students of Arling- 
ton High School. An outstanding 
number of the concert was a violin 
solo played by Annette Rarbaro, a 
member of the Junior Class at 
WHS. Annette played the Second 
Movement of the VVienawski Violin 
Concerto in D Minor. She was ac- 
companied by Janet Macaulay. 

Winchester High Students as 
well as a group of parents who 
transported the orchestra to Arl- 
ington were very proud to have 
WHS represented in such a credit- 
able manner by Annette and 
Janet. Mr. Morrell, principal of 
Arlington High School, was en- 
thusiastic about the concert and ex- 
pressed the hope that it will bo- 
co'tie an annual event. 

NEWELL ELECTED DIRECTOR 

Mr. Roger D. Newell was re- 
cently elected a director df the 
Cyril Johnson Woolen Company, 
Stafford Springs, Conn. Mr. Newell 
is president of the Newell Textile 
Sales Company. New Vork, X. V.. 
sole selling agents for the Cyril 
Johnson firm, 

Born in Winchester, Mr. Newel! 
is the son of Mis. Alice A. Newel! 
of Lewis road, and the late Charles 
F. Newell. He graduated from 
Winchester High School, and is co- 
holder of the school's IOC) yard dash 
record, During World War II he 
saw service in the Marine Corps. 



LANE TAXI 
SERVICE 

Local and distance trips 

Call Winchester 6-2560 




WINCHESTER CAB 

Local and Long Distance 

Earl C. Jordan 

Phones 
Days - 9 a. m. to 6 p. in. 
Winchester 6-1931 

Nights - Sundays - Holidays 
Winchester 6-3583 




rCOUGHLIN JUNK CO. 
K»m, P«p»r. MexatiitM 



j Tel. W 



Metal 

Winchester 6-2040 

m»«-tf 



Dr. Ruth A. Boule 

Chiropodist — Podiatrist 

50 VINE ST. WINCHESTER 
uippoeite Wincheeter Theatr*) 
Hnuri by Appointment Onlr 

Tel. Winchester 6-1989 




FOR ALL 

Autnmohile repaire on all rnakee 
nf ram. rail 

C hristian W. Eriksen 

20 firm* Place. Winrhenter 
WI 

Sperializinsr on Bulfke an-l 
tf,-nf*ral Mntnr i-ar- 

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FIREPLACE WOOD 

LOAM — MANURE 
Asphalt Driveways 
Chimney Repairing and 
Masonwork 

J. A, COSTANZA 

MElrose 1-7*12 nov! 7-tf 



FLOORS 



NEW FLOORS LAID 
OLD ONES RESURFACED 

MEREN0A FLOOR CO. 

Tel. W inchester H-1T7I or 
Wlnrhe-ter 6-3123 



WILLI A M BLANCHARD 

CO., INC. 
Awnings Tenta 
Venetians Blinds Shades 
Tel. CRystal 9-0379 
456 Main St., Wakefield 

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CARPENTER 



i 



Specializing in small home 
| repairs 

ROY W. WILSON 
! 5 Cliff St. WI 6-04S0-W 

) «-pt29-tf 



Thomas Quigley, Jr. 

CONTRACTORS 
CEMENT AND STONE MASON 
MOTOR TRANSPORTATION 
Power Shovel Air CompreaMr 

Ko*d Roller Drilling 

Concrete Miter Blaeting 
Tractor Rock Eiraeatinc 



EMBASSY HAND 
LAUNDRY 

Complete Laundry and 
Dry Cleaning Service 

595 Main Street 

Same Building as First Nat'l. 
Store Super Market 

For delivery call WI 6-2220 
»«pt&.tf 



WINCHESTER'S 

JUNK DEALER 

HIGHEST PRICES PAID 

Call Ed. Murphy 

TEL WI 6-1346-M 



MACEFIELD 

hand wrought 
jewelry and silver 
10 Winchester place 
wi 6-2989 



Jr7-* 



THE WINCHESTER MASS., STAR, FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 2, 1951 



ALTERNATE PLAN FOR 
SCHOOLS VOTED AGAIN 

f Continued from P'aee It 

Mr. Bartlett, speaking for the 
School Committee, told of the need 



ror two 



idints 



pace, .-.tutintc 
that the inadequacy of the present 
buildings is making it difficult to 
carry oat a rounded educational 
program, especially for those nol 
(roing to college. 

Concerning school enrollment, he 
-aid that totals of pupils now in the 
secondary school-, do not tell the 
true story, It is not with the 
present enrollment that the com- 
mittee is concerned, hut with the 
future enrollment. There are now 
in round figures l;500 pupils in the 
elementary schools a.-> opposed to 
J ,300 in 1 and -pace in secon- 
dary buildings must be provided 
for' this increase, if the two shift 
day is not to be necessary. 

Mrs. Kimball of the School Build- 
ing Committee introduced Mr. 
Greeley of the architectural firm of 
Kilham, Hop!. ins, Greeley and 
Brodie, retained by the committee, 
to prepare the plan- under discus- 
sion. 

Mr. Greeley went over the floor 
plans of both the high school and 
junior high school buildings, ex- 
plaining the proposed changes and 
allocation of space with the assis- 
tance of lantei n slides. 

He was followed by Captain 
Rush, who tired the opening gun 
for the Referendum Committee, 
opponents of the •'Alternate Plan". 

Prefacing his remarks with the 
statement that minorities in the 
electorate must he respected, he re- 
iterated the Referendum Commit- 
tee's position that its members 

ant schools as ardently as any- 
one, hut want something a lot bet- 
ter than the Building Committee's 
■Alternate Plan". 

He felt that the townspeople 
I ave been engaged in considering 
so many plan- for secondary 
schools for so long that they aie 
now willing to vote for anything, 
tating as a case in point the state- 
ment made by a school proponent 
that the proposed plan for enlarge- 
ment of the junior high school was 
an "architectural monstrosity". 

The author of that statement 
voted for and worked for the school 
plan during the referendum cam 
naign, as did many more, Captain 
Rush believed, because they have 
come to accept the fact that new 
secondary schools are urgently 
needed at once. 

This urgency as of the present 
Captaltl Rush disputed, stating 
that the schools have been serving 
in the past more than the maximum 
claimed for their capacity by the 
School Committee, and that accord- 
ing to graphs appearing in the 
prospectus of the School Build- 
ing Committee, it will not be ab- 
solutely necessary to have more 
space before 105d, with construc- 
tion starting in 1954. 

Continuing, Captain Rush stated 
that though the Wadleigh School 
Building may not be ideal, we have 
been usinir it and can continue to 
do so for another two years, until 
a better solution for our school 
problems can be worked out. 

He further felt this is no time 
to build anything costing a million 
and three-quarters dollars, ear- 
marking materials which may be 
needed for national defense, espe- 
cially when what we are getting 
may not be the best school we can 
get. Prices and wages may he 
frozen but taxes will skyrocket, 
he said. 

Captain Rush felt the Building 
Committee lost the confidence of 
many when it delayed announcing 
its plans until the best political 
time for securing its favorite Pal- 
mer street plan. It has further 
lost confidence in the way it has 
received criticism. 

Continuing, he stated that only 
a single member of the Building 
Committee has had architectural or 
((instruction experience, and said 
that the Referendum Committee 
believes there should be a new com- 
mittee, drawn from the many per- 
sons in town intimately acquainted 
with both fields. Taking all the 
plans now available, such a com- 
mittee, he believed, could evolve a 



suitable solution to our school 
problem. 

At the conclusion of his address 
Captain Rush asked permission to 
have Mi. (Justin give a detailed re- 
port of the Referendum Commit- 
tee s- objections to the "Alternate 
Plan" of th • Budding Committee, 
us'.iu' thy .-.I lie slides pre ously 
Cu e ey. 
and then 



lid. 
as 



i • i nns.- ion 
.1 was di. - 

had been 
soon as the 



•e had finished 



usi i by Mi. 
was accorded 
covered -hat the a 
tak, n from the hail 
Building Cointr 
with them. 

A recess was taken until the 
slides could be returned, after 
which Mr. Gustin at some length 
went over the various floor plans 
of the enlarged Junior High School, 
pointing out things which the Ref- 
erendum Committee do not believe 
aie trood planning. 

Mr. Gustin stated that he per- 
sonally does not believe that tin- 
plans are basically sound and con- 
sequently differences of opinion 
between the Building Committee 
and the Referendum* Committee do 

not seem susceptible of being re- 
solved. The concept of new addi- 
tions to an old building seemed not 
desirable, he said, as he pointed out 
structural defects, bad orientation, 
excessive underground treatment 
of rooms, with resulting odor, in- 
accessibility of delivery entrance 
for fuel, unfortunate location of 
place I'm gaibage disposal, lack of 
teachers' room quarters, exces- 
sive corridors, lack of consistency 
in dressing booths and gang show- 
ers, the height of the building) its 
proximity to the Unitarian Church, 
and many more alleged defects. 

Telling the meeting that the pro- 
posed school will play a prominent 
part in the future life of Winches- 
ter children, he asked if the pro- 
posed plan is the best that can be 
had for a million and a half dollars, 
adding the opinion that when firm 
bids are asked for the proposed job, 
they will be rejected because the 
work can not be done for the figure 
named. 

Mis. Kimball regretted that the 
Building Committee could not have 
had some of the criticism of the 
pl»n before, and told the meeting 
the Committee is considering hav- 
ing an advisory committee of three 
persons experienced in the con- 
struction field to work with the 
Building Committee in the event 
the plans are accepted. Called 
upon by Mrs. Kimball, Mr. Greeley 
refused to amplify his former re- 
marks, stating that all criticism 
will be considered and that he felt 
the town meeting was not the place 
to discuss his own professional 
ability or the competence of his 
lii ni. 

Mr-. McDonald reported that 
precinct 6 does not want to build 
anything now, adding that people 
in the working class, where taxes 
really hint, are troing to think a 
long time before spending any 
money on the "Alternate Plan". 
Deploring the neglect of the high 
school, she felt with times as they 
aie, and peoples' pocketbooks af- 
fected as they will be, we had bet- 
ter not do anything now, adding 
that in the event the "Alternate 
Plan" were adopted, there would 
be a referendum, with her money 
going on the school opponents, des- 
pite Mr. Schneider's prophecy of 
success. 

Mr. Harold Farnsworth remind- 
ed the Referendum Group that a 
special town meeting costs $50 and 
a referendum, $1,000, adding that 
the Referendum ( ommittee has 
sat by and done nothing construc- 
tive. He reminded the meeting of 
the Parkhurst School difficulty, and 
blamed the present inadequacy of 
space there upon a previous meet- 
ing's taking the advice of Captain 
Rush, 

Mr. Hevis stated that the Ref- 
erendum Committee is registered 
with the Town Clerk and is not a 
"so called" or "alleged" group. He 
said that they had met often, had 
gone over the plans carefully and 

i were airing their objections in 
what the members conceive to be 
the proper place, on the floor of 
town meeting, an opinion which had 
been previously voiced by Mis. 
McDonald, who felt that objectors 

1 to the school plans got scant con- 
sideration at the hearings held. 



Mr. Speers attempted to clarify 
the issue, stating that the "Alter- 
nate Plan" wa"s not hastily con- 
ceived, nor a last minute make- 
shift, but that he as a school com- 
ntitu-e member had knowledge of 
it ab nit a year ago. Ii seemed a 
good common ground on which 
many plans could meet und wot.'! 
solve the pressing need for mei 
- pace in the secondary schools ade- 
quately, without committing the 
town to keen on using th so parti- 
culai buildings and facilities lOi 
all time. 

In reply to a direct question by 
Mis. McDonald, Mr. Clarke of the 
Finance Committee stated that the 
acceptance of t h e "Alternate 
Plan" will add $2.50 per thousand 
dollars to this year's tax rate, with 
another $2.50 increase likely if 
proposed pay raises for town em- 
ployee., are accepted in their 
present form. 

Mr. Barnard asked how compe- 
tent the critics of the School plans 
are themselves and felt nothing is 

more important to the town than 
the best possible education for its 
children. Mr. Saraco explained his 
position as a member of the Refer- 
rendum Committee, and chided 
both the Hoard of Selectmen and 
Finance Committee for showing 
their displeasure openly at 
ers not in accordance with then- 
views on town affairs. 

Captain Rush touched otT the 
final skyrocket of the evening 
when he ventured the opinion that 
no proof of the urgency for build- 
ing had been shown, his remarks 
bringing Mrs. Woodward of the 
School Committee bouncing from 
her seat to the "Mike". 

Because the Committee has got- 
ten along with inadequate condi- 
tions in the secondary schools does 
not mean, she said, that conditions 
are good, or even passable. Get- 
ting experts on a Building Com- 
mittee hadn't proved much in the 
past, since the last Junior High 
Building Committee, on which were 
several experienced in the engin- 
eering field, was not able to sell 
its plans to the town. 

Closing, she ventured the opinion 
that nothing is going to appeal to 
people who do not want to spend 
money, or do anything for the 
schools. 

The loudest applause of the 
evening greeted her remarks, but 
Mrs. Woodside took no part in the 
ovation, taking strong exception to 
the inference that those who do not 
want to spend money, or who won- 
der whether they can spend money, 
are opposed to schools. 

She stated that it is high time 
something is done for the hig-h 
school, the physical condition of 
which is "unpardonable", and 
promised that an article would be 
in the warrant for the March meet- 
ing to do something for this build- 
ing, which for years has been 
given a "lick and a promise". 

Cries of "Question! Question!" 
were being heard after each speak- 
er at this point and Mr. Wadsworth 
called for rising votes, which re- 
sulted in the acceptance of the 
"Alternate Plan" as stated above. 
Mr. Rowe dissolved the meeting as 
usual. 



NEW HOPE FOR HEARTS 



"New H. pe for Hearts" is the 
keynote of the 1951 Heart Fund 
campaign that opens tomorrow to 

raise $350,000 in Massachusetts, it 
wti s announced today by State 
< hairman Kdgar A. Perry. 

Mr. Perry stressed the new spirit 
( hope for the nine million people- 
in the United States who suffei 
from heart disease and the belief 
that heart scientists are on the 
verge of new discoveries that will 
cut the national toll of 000.000 lives 
that are taken annually by our 
country's leading killer. 

The Massachusetts campaign is 
part of the nationwide drive of the 
American Heart Association to 
raise eight million dollars to fi- 
nance a three point program of re- 
search, education, and community 
service. 

Throughout February, Mr. Perry 
and Congressman John P. Kennedy, 
Boston chairman, will head a state 
wide organization of volunteer 
workers who will ask the residents 
of Massachusetts to give to fight 
heart disease. 

The volunteer workers will 
solicit both by mail and door-to- 
door in an effort to give everyone 
an opportunity to do his part in con- 
'lu :. trolling the disease which causes 
one out of every two deaths after 
the age of 45. 

Plastic hearts will again this 
year help human hearts. Over 20,- 
000 of tin- red heart-shaped, plastic 
coin collectors will be placed on re- 
tail counters and other public loca- 



INSTALLATION OF 
ORDER OF RAINBOW 



The installation of officers of the 
the Order of Rainbow for Girls, 

Winchester Assembly, No. 50 was 
held on Friday evening, January 
20, 1051. 

A delicious ham supper was serv- 
ed by the Mothers' Ciub preceding 
the installation. Favors made by 
Susan Graham, ingoing Worthy 
Advisor, wen- enjoyed by all. 

Uev. Howard Louis of Trinity 
Episcopal Church, Woburn, Mass., 
who was the guest speaker for the 
evening and the installing officer, 
I'riscilla Sm